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Economic Development And Political Reform

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Economic Development And Political Reform

The Impact of External Capital on the Middle East

Bradley L. Glasser

Bradley Louis Glasser, teaches Middle Eastern Studies, Brooklyn College, City University of New York, US

2001 160 pp Hardback 978 1 85898 927 3
ebook isbn 978 1 78100 818 8

Hardback £74.00 on-line price £66.60

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Description
‘For those readers who have pondered the question of why, despite external economic aid and revenues from hydrocarbons, many Middle Eastern countries have seen little progress in either economic liberalization or democratization since the 1980s, this book offers an insightful thesis. A number of recent international events, most notably the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States and the resulting war on terrorism, make a number of Bradley Louis Glasser’s arguments worth reviewing. Glasser wrote this book prior to these events; however, the author gives the audience an important lesson in understanding what happens in countries where entrenched poor public policies result in failed political, economic, and social reforms. . . This is a solid and thought-provoking volume for those in the field of emerging markets and Middle Eastern studies, along with policymakers.’
– Helen El Mallakh, The Journal of Energy and Development

‘Bradley Glasser makes a very important contribution to the literature on Middle Eastern political economy by recasting the core concepts of the rentier state literature. This literature suggests that access to exogenous rents can militate against political liberalization and democratization. Glasser suggests that this is both mistaken and simplistic, as regimes such as those in Egypt or Kuwait in the 1980s used exogenous rents to create political openings that favour populist coalitions and non-class actors. In contrast states that lack exogenous rents such as Turkey and Morocco relied on centre right alliances comprising bourgeois groups which support the neo-liberalization promoted by the World Bank and International Monetary Fund. Glasser produces convincing evidence for his hypotheses in this book, which deserves to be widely read by political economists and other social scientists, especially those specializing in Middle Eastern studies.’
– Rodney Wilson, University of Durham, UK

The people of the Middle East face puzzling political realities as they enter the new millennium. Robust Western-style democracies have not yet emerged in the Middle East, yet at the same time, many Middle Eastern countries have experienced an important increase in political liberties in the last two decades.

Economic Development and Political Reform addresses critical trends in the Middle Eastern political economy in the 1980s and 1990s and builds upon the cross-regional political science literature concerning political and economic reforms in the developing world. The book argues that external capital has had a decisive impact on economic and political development in the region.

Contents
Contents: 1. Understanding the Impact of Exogenous Revenues on Political and Economic Reforms 2. The Quest for Economic Heterodoxy in the Middle East 3. The Relationship between Economic and Political Development in the Middle East: A Narrative Political Economy 4. Electoral Controls and Alliances: The Position of the Business Elite and the Center-right in the Parliament 5. Foreign Aid and Reform: The Diverging Paths of Egypt and Jordan in the 1990s 6. Distinctive Development Trajectories in the Middle East Bibliography Index

Further information

‘For those readers who have pondered the question of why, despite external economic aid and revenues from hydrocarbons, many Middle Eastern countries have seen little progress in either economic liberalization or democratization since the 1980s, this book offers an insightful thesis. A number of recent international events, most notably the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States and the resulting war on terrorism, make a number of Bradley Louis Glasser’s arguments worth reviewing. Glasser wrote this book prior to these events; however, the author gives the audience an important lesson in understanding what happens in countries where entrenched poor public policies result in failed political, economic, and social reforms. . . This is a solid and thought-provoking volume for those in the field of emerging markets and Middle Eastern studies, along with policymakers.’
– Helen El Mallakh, The Journal of Energy and Development

‘Bradley Glasser makes a very important contribution to the literature on Middle Eastern political economy by recasting the core concepts of the rentier state literature. This literature suggests that access to exogenous rents can militate against political liberalization and democratization. Glasser suggests that this is both mistaken and simplistic, as regimes such as those in Egypt or Kuwait in the 1980s used exogenous rents to create political openings that favour populist coalitions and non-class actors. In contrast states that lack exogenous rents such as Turkey and Morocco relied on centre right alliances comprising bourgeois groups which support the neo-liberalization promoted by the World Bank and International Monetary Fund. Glasser produces convincing evidence for his hypotheses in this book, which deserves to be widely read by political economists and other social scientists, especially those specializing in Middle Eastern studies.’
– Rodney Wilson, University of Durham, UK

The people of the Middle East face puzzling political realities as they enter the new millennium. Robust Western-style democracies have not yet emerged in the Middle East, yet at the same time, many Middle Eastern countries have experienced an important increase in political liberties in the last two decades.

Economic Development and Political Reform addresses critical trends in the Middle Eastern political economy in the 1980s and 1990s and builds upon the cross-regional political science literature concerning political and economic reforms in the developing world. The book argues that external capital has had a decisive impact on economic and political development in the region.  

The author focuses mainly on Turkey, Morocco, Egypt and Kuwait and also considers important developments in other Middle Eastern countries. He demonstrates that Middle Eastern states lacking substantial exogenous revenues – including oil and foreign aid – have experienced severe fiscal crises and have been forced to pursue neo-liberal economic strategies. By contrast, those states with greater exogenous resources have undergone milder economic crises and developed more populist economic models.

Providing new theoretical perspectives on Third World political and economic reform, this innovative volume will be of particular interest to political economists, international governmental and developmental organizations, international financial institutions and non-governmental organizations in this region.



 
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