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New Developments In Environmental Sociology

New Developments In Environmental Sociology

Michael R. Redclift , Graham Woodgate

Edited by Michael R. Redclift, Emeritus Professor of International Environmental Policy, King’s College, University of London, UK and Graham Woodgate, Senior Lecturer in Environmental Sociology, Institute for the Study of the Americas, School of Advanced Study, University of London, UK

2005 672 pp Hardback 978 1 84376 115 0

Hardback £191.00 on-line price £171.90

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Series: Elgar Mini Series






Description
‘This is an invaluable collection: a sharply-focused archive of contemporary thinking on society and nature.’
– William M. Adams, Downing College, Cambridge University, UK

This important volume presents a selection of influential articles written by leading scholars whose research is seminal in the development of environmental sociology. The contributors take the discussions of the environmental social sciences into new domains, for example genetics and ‘de-materialisation’, as well as suggesting new conceptual approaches to familiar problems, such as those of globalisation, scientific uncertainty and environmental citizenship.

This outstanding collection, which is a fully up to date companion to the title The Sociology of the Environment, published in 1995, represents a landmark in a field of academic research that is increasingly important for wider policy questions. The volume will be useful to all those interested in environmental issues.

Contents
30 articles, dating from 1996 to 2003 Contributors include: J. Barnett, A. Blowers, M. Cohen, D. Demeritt, P. Dickens, A. Escobar, A. Mol, J. Murphy, S. Yearley

Further information

‘This is an invaluable collection: a sharply-focused archive of contemporary thinking on society and nature.’
– William M. Adams, Downing College, Cambridge University, UK

This important volume presents a selection of influential articles written by leading scholars whose research is seminal in the development of environmental sociology. The contributors take the discussions of the environmental social sciences into new domains, for example genetics and ‘de-materialisation’, as well as suggesting new conceptual approaches to familiar problems, such as those of globalisation, scientific uncertainty and environmental citizenship.

This outstanding collection, which is a fully up to date companion to the title The Sociology of the Environment, published in 1995, represents a landmark in a field of academic research that is increasingly important for wider policy questions. The volume will be useful to all those interested in environmental issues.

Full table of contents

Contents
Acknowledgements
Introduction Graham Woodgate and Michael R. Redclift
PART I SOCIAL THEORY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
1. Riley E. Dunlap and William R. Catton, Jr. (2002), ‘Which Function(s) of the Environment Do We Study? A Comparison of Environmental and Natural Resource Sociology’
2. Frederick H. Buttel (2000), ‘Classical Theory and Contemporary Environmental Sociology: Some Reflections on the Antecedents and Prospects for Reflexive Modernization Theories in the Study of Environment and Society’
3. Allan Schnaiberg, David N. Pellow and Adam Weinberg (2002), ‘The Treadmill of Production and the Environmental State’
4. John Bellamy Foster (1999), ‘Marx’s Theory of Metabolic Rift: Classical Foundations for Environmental Sociology’
5. Peter Dickens (2001), ‘Linking the Social and Natural Sciences: Is Capital Modifying Human Biology in Its Own Image?’
6. Marina Fischer-Kowalski and Helga Weisz (1999), ‘Society as Hybrid Between Material and Symbolic Realms: Toward a Theoretical Framework of Society-Nature Interaction’
7. Arturo Escobar (1996), ‘Constructing Nature: Elements for a Poststructural Political Ecology’
8. Éric Darier (1999), ‘Foucault and the Environment: An Introduction’
9. Alan Irwin (2001), ‘Society, Nature, Knowledge: Co-constructing the Social and the Natural’
PART II ECOLOGICAL MODERNISATION
10. Joseph Murphy (2000), ‘Ecological Modernisation’
11. Joseph Huber (2000), ‘Towards Industrial Ecology: Sustainable Development as a Concept of Ecological Modernization’
12. Andrew Blowers (1997), ‘Environmental Policy: Ecological Modernisation or the Risk Society?’
13. Arthur P.J. Mol (2000), ‘The Environmental Movement in an Era of Ecological Modernisation’
PART III SOCIETY, NATURE AND KNOWLEDGE, AND THE FORMULATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF PUBLIC POLICY
14. Noel Castree and Bruce Braun (1998), ‘The Construction of Nature and the Nature of Construction: Analytical and Political Tools for Building Survivable Futures’
15. David Demeritt (1998), ‘Science, Social Constructivism and Nature’
16. Sheila Jasanoff and Brian Wynne (1998), ‘Science and Decisionmaking’
17. Joseph Murphy and Maurie J. Cohen (2001), ‘Consumption, Environment and Public Policy’
PART IV GLOBALISATION, THE STATE AND ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNANCE
18. Wolfgang Sachs (1999), ‘Globalization and Sustainability’
19. Steven Yearley (1996), ‘Rethinking the Global’
20. David John Frank, Ann Hironaka and Evan Schofer (2000), ‘The Nation-State and the Natural Environment Over the Twentieth Century’
21. Frederick H. Buttel (2000), ‘World Society, the Nation-State, and Environmental Protection: Comment on Frank, Hironaka, and Schofer’
22. David John Frank, Ann Hironaka and Evan Schofer (2000), ‘Environmentalism as a Global Institution: Reply to Buttel’
23. Jon Barnett (2001), ‘Environmental Security for People’
24. Michael Redclift (2001), ‘Environmental Security and the Recombinant Human: Sustainability in the Twenty-first Century’
25. John S. Dryzek (1997), ‘Leave it to the People: Democratic Pragmatism’
26. Bianca Ambrose-Oji, Tim Allmark, Peter Buckley, Bindi Clements and Graham Woodgate (2002), ‘The Environmental State and the Forest: Of Lookouts, Lumberjacks, Leopards, and Losers’
PART V AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND SUSTAINABLE RURAL DEVELOPMENT
27. Margaret FitzSimmons and David Goodman (1998), ‘Incorporating Nature: Environmental Narratives and the Reproduction of Food’
28. Sarah Whatmore and Lorraine Thorne (1997), ‘Nourishing Networks: Alternative Geographies of Food’
29. Graham Woodgate, Bianca Ambrose-Oji, Ramón Fernandez Durán, Gloria Guzmán and Eduardo Sevilla Guzmán (1999), ‘Alternative Food and Agriculture Networks: An Agroecological Perspective on Responses to Economic Globalisation and the “New” Agrarian Question’
30. Terry Marsden (2003), ‘Conclusions: Rural Development as “Real” Ecological Modernisation?’
Name Index



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