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China’s Creative Industries

Copyright, Social Network Markets and the Business of Culture in a Digital Age Lucy Montgomery, Research Fellow, Australian Research Council funded Center of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Australia
China’s Creative Industries explores the role of new technologies, globalization and higher levels of connectivity in redefining relationships between ‘producers’ and ‘consumers’ in 21st century China.
Extent: 168 pp
Hardback Price: £72.00 Web: £64.80
Publication Date: 2010
ISBN: 978 1 84844 864 3
Availability: In Stock
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China’s Creative Industries explores the role of new technologies, globalization and higher levels of connectivity in redefining relationships between ‘producers’ and ‘consumers’ in 21st century China.

The evolution of new business models, the impact of state regulation, the rise of entrepreneurial consumers and the role of intellectual property rights are traced through China’s film, music and fashion industries. The book argues that social network markets, consumer entrepreneurship and business model evolution are driving forces in the production and commercialization of cultural commodities. In doing so it raises important questions about copyright’s role in the business of culture, particularly in a digital age.

With a specially commissioned foreword by John Hartley, this insightful book will appeal to post-graduate students and academic researchers in China and Asian studies, intellectual property, cultural studies, film, music and fashion studies, cultural economics and innovation management. People working in the creative industries with an interest in devising strategies for expansion into the Chinese market, as well as people working in the creative industries outside China with an interest in developing successful digital strategies, will also find much to interest them in this book.
‘Other than the obvious disciplines of economics, politics, sociology, media and cultural studies, students and academics studying China and Asian studies, law, film, music and fashion studies, business and management will all find something of interest and use in this delightful book. Further, this book is highly recommended to anyone who wishes to begin to understand some of the most significant transformations in law, business, art and the digital world taking place all around us, via Montgomery’s scrutiny of three “creative industries” in China. She is truly an interdisciplinary scholar who is capable of putting together a complex jigsaw puzzle in a most imaginative and informative manner.’
– Herb Thompson, Journal of Contemporary Asia

‘China’s Creative Industries provides a coherent argument with real drive and purpose. It advances our theoretical and conceptual understanding of the creative industries, of intellectual property, and why these things need to be thought about differently. It shows why China is important to the overall situation and not just a regional application. I really like the build-up of concepts, from “entrepreneurial governmentality” and the ‘entrepreneurial consumer’ to a reworked notion of intellectual property that applies not only to China. Whether you’re interested in economic, cultural, technological, Chinese or copyright issues, I commend China’s Creative Industries to your attention. As Montgomery demonstrates, the problem of indeterminacy in how we understand the creative industries that I have tried to elaborate above – the question “Whose creative industries?” – does have one emergent but clear answer: China’s creative industries.’
– From the foreword by John Hartley, AM, Australian Research Council (ARC), Federation Fellow and Research Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

‘Digital economy policy for the creative industries is framed too commonly in terms of refining and strengthening intellectual property rights. As digitalization grows in scope and importance, Lucy Montgomery’s intriguing book shows how the limitations of this narrow approach have become all too apparent, as China’s creative industries are thriving in an ever increasing digital global society because (and not despite) of the fact that their businesses, innovations, skills and markets have grown up with weak copyright enforcement regimes.’
– Birgitte Andersen, Birkbeck College, University of London, UK

‘Lucy Montgomery brings together thought-provoking insights into China’s cultural and creative sectors, notably the shift from official culture to entrepreneurial consumers, the relative unimportance of copyright compared to Western economies, and the need for us to understand evolutionary economics. The result is a new model of China’s online networks as a public source of cultural products. Her book should be required reading everywhere that wants to understand what is happening in China.’
– John Howkins, City University, London, Howkins & Associates, Shanghai and author of Creative Ecologies
Contents: Foreword: Whose Creative Industries? by John Hartley 1. Introduction: From Governance to Entrepreneurial Consumers 2. Dynamics of Power: From State to Consumer 3. China’s Film Industry: Tension and Transformation 4. China’s Music Industry: Space to Grow 5. Fashion and Consumer Entrepreneurs 6. Does Weaker Copyright Mean Stronger Creative Industries 7. Conclusion: Transition Phase or a Sign of Things to Come? References Index