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Comparative Science and Technology Policy

Edited by Sheila Jasanoff, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, US
Science and technology policy is widely recognized as a critically important sphere of state activity. This book presents an authoritative overview of comparative research on science and technology policy in order to illuminate the choices that confront decision makers in this field.
Extent: 680 pp
Hardback Price: $330.00 Web: $297.00
Publication Date: 1997
ISBN: 978 1 85898 424 7
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  • Politics and Public Policy
  • Public Policy
Science and technology policy is widely recognized as a critically important sphere of state activity. This book presents an authoritative overview of comparative research on science and technology policy in order to illuminate the choices that confront decision makers in this field. With contributions from various disciplines including economics, political science, law and science and technology studies, the selection of articles reflects both traditional perspectives and those which challenge conventional assumptions. The book covers such topics as the relationship between science and the state, and comparisons of how different governments seek to support and regulate scientific research, technology, industrial innovation and global competitiveness. Finally it looks at how international influences can affect national policies.
27 articles, dating from 1975 to 1995
Contributors include: R. Nelson, H. Nowotny, K. Pavitt, J. Ruggie, D. Vogel
PART I: Science, Technology, and the State

1. Y. Ezrahi (1984), ‘Science and Utopia in Late 20th Century Pluralist Democracy: With a Special Reference to the U.S.A’
2. J.G. Ruggie (1975), ‘International Responses to Technology: Concepts and Trends’
3. E. Solingen (1993), ‘Between Markets and the State: Scientists in Comparative Perspective’
4. A. Jamison (1987), ‘National Styles of Science and Technology: A Comparative Model’

PART II: Governmental Support for Science
5. H. Nowotny (1990), ‘Knowledge for Certainty: Poverty, Welfare Institutions and the Institutionalization of Social Science’
6. A. Rip (1994), ‘The Republic of Science in the 1990’s’
7. A. Elzinga and I. Bohlin (1989), ‘The Politics of Science in Polar Regions’
8. Y. Gingras and M. Trépanier (1993), ‘Constructing a Tokamak: Political, Economic, and Technical Factors as Constraints and Resources’

PART III: Cross-National Perspectives on Technology Policy
9. Henry Ergas (1987), ‘Does Technology Policy Matter?’
10. R.R. Nelson (1990), ‘U.S. Technological Leadership: Where Did It Come From, and Where Did It Go?’
11. M. Evangelista (1989), ‘Issue-Area and Foreign Policy Revisited’
12. H. Willke (1995), ‘The Proactive State: The Role of National Enabling Policies in Global Socio-Economic Transformations’

PART IV: Cultures of Innovation
13. P. Patel and K. Pavitt (1994), ‘National Innovation Systems: Why They Are Important, and How They Might Be Measured and Compared’
14. H. Kitschelt (1991), ‘Industrial Governance Structures, Innovation Strategies and the Case of Japan: Sectoral or Cross-National Comparative Analysis?’
15. J. Nicholas Ziegler (1995), ‘Institutions, Elites, and Technological Change in France and Germany’

PART V: Regulatory Politics and Policy
16. Sheila Jasanoff (1990), ‘American Exceptionalism and the Political Acknowledgement of Risk’
17. J. Abraham and E. Millstone (1989), ‘Food Additive Controls: Some International Comparisons’
18. D. Vogel (1992), ‘Consumer Protection and Protectionism in Japan’
19. K. Harrison and G. Hoberg (1991), ‘Setting the Environmental Agenda in Canada and the United States: The Cases of Dioxin and Radon‘
20. M.R. Reich (1995), ‘The Politics of Agenda Setting in International Health: Child Health versus Adult Health in Developing Countries’
21. A.L. Bonnicksen (1994), ‘National and International Approaches to Human Germ-Line Gene Therapy’
22. M.E. Porter and Claas van der Linde (1995), ‘Toward a New Conception of the Environment-Competitiveness Relationship’(22)

PART VI: International Influences and National Policy
23. P.M. Haas (1989), ‘Do Regimes Matter? Epistemic Communities and Mediterranean Pollution Control’
24. M.A. Hajer (1995), ‘Politics on the Move: The Democratic Control of the Design of Sustainable Technologies’
25. D. Laurence and B. Wynne (1989), ‘Transporting Waste in the European Community: A Free Market? ’
26. A. Mol and J. Law (1994), ‘Regions, Networks and Fluids: Anaemia and Social Topology’
27. J.N. Rosenau (1992), ‘The Relocation of Authority in a Shrinking World’