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Critical Perspectives on Globalization

Edited by Marina Della Giusta, Lecturer, Uma S. Kambhampati, Senior Lecturer, University of Reading Business School, UK and Robert Hunter Wade, Professor of Political Economy, London School of Economics and Political Science, UK
This authoritative edited volume offers, for the first time, a selection of critical perspectives on globalization. These critiques incorporate work from radical and feminist scholars opposing the new liberal ideology underlying globalization. It also sheds new light on the different types of costs and risks of globalization in terms of environment, health hazards, international terrorism and cultural homogenization.

The book is intended for a wide audience and will be of interest to students and researchers in economics, politics, international relations, geography and development studies, as well as policy makers and activists in governmental and non-governmental organizations.
Extent: 688 pp
Hardback Price: $335.00 Web: $301.50
Publication Date: 2006
ISBN: 978 1 84542 176 2
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  • Business and Management
  • Critical Management Studies
  • Economics and Finance
  • International Economics
This authoritative edited volume offers, for the first time, a selection of critical perspectives on globalization. These critiques incorporate work from radical and feminist scholars opposing the new liberal ideology underlying globalization. It also sheds new light on the different types of costs and risks of globalization in terms of environment, health hazards, international terrorism and cultural homogenization.

The book is intended for a wide audience and will be of interest to students and researchers in economics, politics, international relations, geography and development studies, as well as policy makers and activists in governmental and non-governmental organizations.
33 articles, dating from 1996 to 2005
Contributors include: S. Amin, V. Bennhold-Thomsen, N. Birdsall, S. George, N. Kabeer, J. Mander, D. Rodrik, V. Shiva, A. Wood
Contents:
Acknowledgements
Introduction Marina Della Giusta, Uma S. Kambhampati and Robert Hunter Wade
PART I SYSTEMIC CRITIQUES OF GLOBALIZATION
A Critiques of the Neo-Liberal Ideology Underlying Globalization
1. Samir Amin (1997), ‘The Future of Global Polarization’
2. Saskia Sassen (1996), ‘The State and the New Geography of Power’
3. Branko Milanovic (2003), ‘The Two Faces of Globalization: Against Globalization as We Know It’
4. Ha-Joon Chang and Ilene Grabel (2004), Introduction and Part I, Chapters 1-4, in Reclaiming Development: An Alternative Economic Policy Manual
5. Robert Hunter Wade (2004), ‘Is Globalization Reducing Poverty and Inequality?’
6. Robert Hunter Wade (2004), ‘On the Causes of Increasing World Poverty and Inequality, or Why the Matthew Effect Prevails’
7. Adrian Wood (1998), ‘Globalisation and the Rise in Labour Market Inequalities’
8. Dani Rodrik (2005), ‘Feasible Globalizations’
9. Dani Rodrik (2002), ‘Globalization for Whom? Time to Change the Rules – and Focus on Poor Workers’
10. Nancy Birdsall (2002), ‘Asymmetric Globalization: Global Markets Require Good Global Politics’
11. Jane D’Arista (2000), ‘Reforming International Financial Architecture’
B The Sustainability Critique
12. Susan George (2003), ‘Globalizing Rights?’
13. Vandana Shiva (2000), ‘War against Nature and the People of the South’
14. Simon Retallack (2001), ‘The Environmental Cost of Economic Globalization’
15. Jerry Mander (2001), ‘Technologies of Globalization’
16. Peter Newell (2002), ‘A World Environment Organisation: The Wrong Solution to the Wrong Problem’ 17. Nicholas G. Faraclas (2001), ‘Melanesia, the Banks, and the BINGOs: Real Alternatives are Everywhere (Except in the Consultants’ Briefcases)’
18. Veronika Bennholdt-Thomsen (2001), ‘What Really Keeps Our Cities Alive, Money or Subsistence?’
C Gender and Globalization
19. Christine M. Koggel (2003), ‘Globalization and Women’s Paid Work: Expanding Freedom?’
20. Richa Nagar, Victoria Lawson, Linda McDowell and Susan Hanson (2002), ‘Locating Globalization: Feminist (Re)readings of the Subjects and Spaces of Globalization’
21. Ruth Pearson (2000), ‘Moving the Goalposts: Gender and Globalisation in the Twenty-first Century’
22. Korkut Ertürk and William Darity, Jr. (2000), ‘Secular Changes in the Gender Composition of Employment and Growth Dynamics in the North and the South’
23. Dong-Sook S. Gills (2002), ‘Globalization of Production and Women in Asia’
24. Rhacel Salazar Parreñas (2001), ‘The International Division of Reproductive Labor’
25. Naila Kabeer (2004), ‘Globalization, Labor Standards, and Women’s Rights: Dilemmas of Collective (In)action in an Interdependent World’
PART II RISKS AND THREATS ASSOCIATED WITH GLOBALIZATION
26. Richard Barnet and John Cavanagh (2001), ‘Electronic Money and the Casino Economy’
27. David L. Heymann (2003), ‘The Evolving Infectious Disease Threat: Implications for National and Global Security’
28. Takis Fotopoulos (2002), ‘The Global “War” of the Transnational Elite’
29. Christopher W. Hughes (2002), ‘Reflections on Globalisation, Security and 9/11’
30. Lael Brainard (2002), ‘A Turning Point for Globalisation? The Implications for the Global Economy of America’s Campaign against Terrorism’
31. Arshin Adib-Moghaddam (2002), ‘Global Intifadah? September 11th and the Struggle within Islam’
32. John Tomlinson (1999), ‘Globalised Culture: The Triumph of the West?’
33. Desmond King and Amrita Narlikar (2003), ‘The New Risk Regulators? International Organisations and Globalisation’
Name Index