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Families and Family Policies

Edited by Chiara Saraceno, Honorary Fellow, Collegio Carlo Alberto, Turin, Italy, Jane Lewis, Professor of Social Policy, London School of Economics, UK and Arnlaug Leira, Professor of Sociology, University of Oslo, Norway
Governments have had a longstanding interest in family forms and the behaviour of family members, although their goals and instruments have differed over time and across countries. This timely collection, along with an original introduction by the editors, brings together seminal contributions focusing on a number of important topics relating to this field. Volume I focuses on the origins and social foundations of family policies, their main actors and drivers; together with consideration of crucial concepts and themes, including gender, intergenerational obligations and care. Volume II deals with the various areas and goals addressed by family policies and their diversity across countries: the politics of reproduction; support for children, policies to reconcile paid work and family obligations; parenthood policies; patterns of care policies and domestic violence. This important set will be of immense value to those working in the field of families and family policies and will be an excellent source of reference to both students and academics.
Two volume set
Extent: 1,284 pp
Hardback Price: £433.00 Web: £389.70
Publication Date: 2012
ISBN: 978 1 84844 782 0
Availability: In Stock
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  • Development Studies
  • Development Studies
  • Family and Gender Policy
  • Social Policy and Sociology
  • Comparative Social Policy
  • Family and Gender Policy
Governments have had a longstanding interest in family forms and the behaviour of family members, although their goals and instruments have differed over time and across countries. This timely collection, along with an original introduction by the editors, brings together seminal contributions focusing on a number of important topics relating to this field. Volume I focuses on the origins and social foundations of family policies, their main actors and drivers; together with consideration of crucial concepts and themes, including gender, intergenerational obligations and care. Volume II deals with the various areas and goals addressed by family policies and their diversity across countries: the politics of reproduction; support for children, policies to reconcile paid work and family obligations; parenthood policies; patterns of care policies and domestic violence. This important set will be of immense value to those working in the field of families and family policies and will be an excellent source of reference to both students and academics.
‘A genuinely international and hugely valuable collection of papers on one of the most important strands in modern social policy scholarship. It also has a powerful editorial introduction that is likely to become a standard reference point.’
– Howard Glennester, London School of Economics, UK
51 articles, dating from 1941 to 2010
Contributors include: F. Castles, M. Daly, N. Folbre, A. Gauthier, A. Kahn, S. Kamerman, F. Kaufmann, T. Knijn, S. McLanahan, A. Orloff, G. Therborn, J. Waldfogel
Contents:

Volume I: Definitions. Historical Origins, Actors and Drivers, Concepts and Debates

Acknowledgements

Introduction: Families and States - Chiara Saraceno, Arnlaug Leira and Jane Lewis

PART I WHAT IS FAMILY POLICY? CONCEPTS, INDICATORS, DIMENSIONS FOR THE ANALYSIS OF FAMILY POLICIES
1. Sheila B. Kamerman and Alfred J. Kahn (1978), ‘Families and the Idea of Family Policy’
2. Wilfried Dumon and Joan Aldous (1979), ‘European and United States Political Contexts for Family Policy Research
3. Anne Hélène Gauthier (1996), ‘Conclusion’
4. Franz-Xaver Kaufmann (2002), ‘Politics and Policies towards the Family in Europe: A Framework and an Inquiry into their Differences and Convergences’

PART II THE SOCIAL FOUNDATIONS OF FAMILY POLICIES
5. Alva Myrdal (1941), ‘In Cash or in Kind’
6. Seth Koven and Sonya Michel (1990), ‘Womanly Duties: Maternalist Politics and the Origins of Welfare States in France, Germany, Great Britain, and the United States, 1880–1920’
7. Kimberly J. Morgan (2009), ‘The Religious Foundations of Work-Family Policies in Western Europe’

PART III ACTORS AND DRIVERS
8. Sara McLanahan (1985), ‘Family Structure and the Reproduction of Poverty’
9. Arnlaug Leira (1992), ‘Models of Motherhood’
10. Göran Therborn (1996), ‘Child Politics: Dimensions and Perspectives’
11. Chiara Saraceno (1997), ‘Family Change, Family Policies and the Restructuring of Welfare’
12. Francis G. Castles (2003), ‘The World Turned Upside Down: Below Replacement Fertility, Changing Preferences and Family-Friendly Public Policy in 21 OECD Countries’
13. Susan Greenhalgh (2003), ‘Planned Births, Unplanned Persons: “Population” in the Making of Chinese Modernity’
14. Jane Lewis, Mary Campbell and Carmen Huerta (2008), ‘Patterns of Paid and Unpaid Work in Western Europe: Gender, Commodification, Preferences and the Implications for Policy’

PART IV CONCEPTS AND THEMES
A Gender
15. Jane Lewis (1992), ‘Gender and the Development of Welfare Regimes’
16. Ann Shola Orloff (1993), ‘Gender and the Social Rights of Citizenship: The Comparative Analysis of Gender Relations and Welfare States’
17. Gillian Pascall and Nick Manning (2000), ‘Gender and Social Policy: Comparing Welfare States in Central and Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union’

B Intergenerational Obligations
18. Jane Millar and Andrea Warman (1996), ‘Balancing Obligations’
19. Nancy Folbre (2001), ‘Children as Pets’
20. Manuela Naldini (2003), ‘A Model for Analysing Social Policy in Mediterranean Countries’
21. Chiara Saraceno and Wolfgang Keck (2010), ‘Can We Identify Intergenerational Policy Regimes in Europe?’

C Care
22. Jens Alber (1995), ‘A Framework for the Comparative Study of Social Services’
23. Anneli Anttonen and Jorma Sipilä (1996), ‘European Social Care Services: Is It Possible to Identify Models?’
24. Trudie Knijn and Monique Kremer (1997), ‘Gender and the Caring Dimension of Welfare States: Toward Inclusive Citizenship’
25. Sigrid Leitner (2003), ‘Varieties of Familialism: The Caring Function of the Family in Comparative Perspective’


Volume II: Dimensions of Family Policy

Acknowledgements

Introduction: Families and States Chiara Saraceno, Jane Lewis and Arnlaug Leira

PART I THE POLITICS OF REPRODUCTION
1. Jane Jenson (1986), ‘Gender and Reproduction: Or, Babies and the State’
2. Sten Johansson and Ola Nygren (1991), ‘The Missing Girls of China: A New Demographic Account’
3. Sheila Shaver (1993/4), ‘Body Rights, Social Rights and the Liberal Welfare State’

PART II SUPPORTING CHILDREN
4. Ben White (1999), ‘Defining the Intolerable: Child Work, Global Standards and Cultural Relativism’
5. Gøsta Esping-Andersen (2002), ‘A Child-centered Social Investment Strategy’
6. Jane Waldfogel (2002), ‘Child Care, Women’s Employment and Child Outcomes’
7. Pavla Miller (2005), ‘Useful and Priceless Children in Contemporary Welfare States’
8. Jonathan Bradshaw (2006), ‘Child Benefit Packages in 15 Countries in 2004’
9. Maxine Molyneux (2006), ‘Mothers at the Service of the New Poverty Agenda: Progresa / Oportunidades, Mexico’s Conditional Transfer Programme’
10. Brenda G. McGowan (2010), ‘An Historical Perspective on Child Welfare’

PART III POLICIES TO RECONCILE PAID WORK AND FAMILY OBLIGATIONS
11. Irene Dingeldey (2001), ‘European Tax Systems and their Impact on Family Employment Patterns’
12. Janet C. Gornick and Alexandra Heron (2006), ‘The Regulation of Working Time as Work-Family Reconciliation Policy: Comparing Europe, Japan, and the United States’
13. Rianne Mahon (2006), ‘The OECD and the Work/Family Reconciliation Agenda: Competing Frames’
14. Anne Revillard (2006), ‘Work/Family Policy in France: From State Familialism to State Feminism?’
15. Thomas Bahle (2008), ‘Family Policy Patterns in the Enlarged EU’

PART IV PARENTHOOD POLICIES
16. Barbara Hobson (1994), ‘Solo Mothers, Social Policy Regimes and the Logic of Gender’
17. Trudie Knijn, Claude Martin and Jane Millar (2007), ‘Activation as a Common Framework for Social Policies towards Lone Parents’
18. Arnlaug Leira (2008), ‘Childcare in Scandinavia: Parental Responsibility and Social Right’
19. Margaret O’Brien (2009), ‘Fathers, Parental Leave Policies, and Infant Quality of Life: International Perspectives and Policy Impact’

PART V PATTERNS OF CARE POLICIES
20. Mary Daly (2002), ‘Care as a Good for Social Policy’
21. Clare Ungerson (2004), ‘Whose Empowerment and Independence? A Cross-national Perspective on “Cash for Care” Schemes’
22. Birgit Pfau-Effinger (2005), ‘Welfare State Policies and the Development of Care Arrangements’
23. Francesca Bettio, Annamaria Simonazzi and Paola Villa (2006), ‘Change in Care Regimes and Female Migration: The “Care Drain” in the Mediterranean’
24. Dawn Lyon and Miriam Glucksmann (2008), ‘Comparative Configurations of Care Work across Europe’
25. Fiona Williams and Anna Gavanas (2008), ‘The Intersection of Childcare Regimes and Migration Regimes: A Three-Country Study’

PART VI DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
26. Darren Hawkins and Melissa Humes (2002), ‘Human Rights and Domestic Violence’