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Islamic Education in the United States and the Evolution of Muslim Nonprofit Institutions

Sabith Khan, Assistant Professor, California Lutheran University and Shariq Siddiqui, Executive Director, Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action and Visiting Assistant Professor and Director, Muslim Philanthropy Initiative, Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, Indiana University–Purdue University, Indianapolis, US
This book is a novel and ambitious attempt to map the Muslim American nonprofit sector: its origins, growth and impact on American society. Using theories from the fields of philanthropy, public administration and data gathered from surveys and interviews, the authors make a compelling case for the Muslim American nonprofit sector’s key role in America. They argue that in a time when Islamic schools are grossly misunderstood, there is a need to examine them closely, for the landscape of these schools is far more complex than meets the eye.
Extent: 168 pp
Hardback Price: $99.95 Web: $89.95
Publication Date: 2017
ISBN: 978 1 78643 479 1
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This book is a novel and ambitious attempt to map the Muslim American nonprofit sector: its origins, growth and impact on American society. Using theories from the fields of philanthropy, public administration and data gathered from surveys and interviews, the authors make a compelling case for the Muslim American nonprofit sector’s key role in America. They argue that in a time when Islamic schools are grossly misunderstood, there is a need to examine them closely, for the landscape of these schools is far more complex than meets the eye.

The authors, who are both scholars of philanthropy, examine how identity impacts philanthropy and also the various forces that have shaped the landscape of Muslim American giving in the US. Using a comparative method of analysis, they showcase how this sector has contributed not only to individual communities but also to the country as a whole. National surveys and historical analysis offer data that is rich in insights and offers a compelling narrative of the sector as a whole through its focus on Islamic schools. The authors also critically examine how nonprofit leaders in the community legitimize their own roles and that of their organizations, and offer a compelling and insightful examination of how Muslim American leaders perceive their own role in institution building.

This is a must read for anyone seeking to understand this important and growing sector of American society, including nonprofit leaders in the Muslim community, leaders of Islamic schools, nonprofit leaders with interest in private schools, activists, and scholars who study philanthropy and Islamic education.
‘This book by Khan and Siddiqui offers an incredibly insightful look into the formation and workings of Islamic schools in the US as nonprofit organizations. As scholars, they offer both a historical and contemporary analysis of these institutions, with a focus on their transformation and quest for legitimacy, as American religious and educational nonprofits. While there are studies that look at the evolution of religious institutions or educational institutions, this is the first book of its kind that brings both these facets together and offers us a compelling nonprofit narrative, based on empirical research, drawn from a nationally representative sample. A much needed contribution to the literature, this book will be useful not only to scholars studying nonprofit organizations, philanthropy, and education; but also those who are seeking to better understand the evolving roles and changing landscape of Muslim American institutions.’
– Chao Guo, University of Pennsylvania, US

‘Khan and Siddiqui offer an invaluable resource for anyone interested in the intersections of religion, philanthropy, and the nonprofit sector in America. With a depth of analysis focused on the network of Islamic schools in the US, their work also provides a welcome addition to a developing scholarship on Muslim-American philanthropy. Khan and Siddiqui demonstrate they are two of the leading experts in this burgeoning conversation.’
– David P. King, Indiana University–Purdue University, Indianapolis, US

‘Islamic philanthropy and Islamic schools are both grossly misunderstood in the American context. This new book by Sabith Khan and Shariq Siddiqui offers a fresh perspective of Islamic institutions, based on an extensive survey data and indepth interviews. It seeks to dispel many of the myths surrounding Islamic education and uses an institutional analysis framework to understand how Muslim communities have worked to build institutions that have supported their culture and values.’
– Reza Aslan, author of god: The Human Quest to Make Sense of the Divine
Contents: 1. Introduction 2. Islamic Philanthropy as a discursive tradition 3. Muslim Philanthropy and Nonprofit Institutions in America 4. Identification and American Muslim philanthropy 5. Philanthropy, Institution Building and Legitimacy in Islamic Schools in America 6. Interlocutors of tradition or signposts of the future of Islam in America? : Islamic Schools in the US 7. Conclusion: prospects for future growth and development Index