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Market Instruments and the Protection of Natural Resources

Edited by Natalie P. Stoianoff, Professor of Law and Director, Intellectual Property Program, University of Technology Sydney, Australia, Larry Kreiser, Professor Emeritus of Accounting, Cleveland State University, US, Bill Butcher, Director of Coursework Programs, Taxation and Business Law, University of New South Wales, Australia, Janet E. Milne, Professor of Law and Director of the Environmental Tax Policy Institute, Vermont Law School, US and Hope Ashiabor, Associate Professor of Law, Faculty of Business and Economics, Macquarie University, Australia
Only through a concerted global effort can we protect our natural resources, save our precious natural environment, and indeed our future. But pressures on natural resources come from many directions such as overuse, mismanagement and contamination. This much-needed book reviews and evaluates the use of market and fiscal instruments in protecting our natural resources, from rural to marine environments. Market instruments that are designed to protect the global atmosphere are evaluated, along with carbon instruments and environmental tax incentives. Meanwhile, consideration is given to shifting the tax burden to achieve environmentally responsible outcomes, balancing sustainable use and natural resource protection, and protecting water resources.
Extent: 264 pp
Hardback Price: $125.00 Web: $112.50
Publication Date: 2016
ISBN: 978 1 78643 120 2
Availability: In Stock
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  • Environment
  • Environmental Economics
  • Environmental Law
  • Environmental Politics and Policy
  • Law - Academic
  • Energy Law
  • Environmental Law
  • Tax Law and Fiscal Policy
  • Politics and Public Policy
  • Environmental Politics and Policy
Only through a concerted global effort can we protect our natural resources, save our precious natural environment, and indeed our future. Pressures on our natural environment come from many directions, including overuse, mismanagement and contamination, all of which must be addressed through a range of measures as part of an international response. This much-needed book reviews and evaluates the use of market and fiscal instruments in protecting our natural resources, from rural to marine environments.

The expert contributors emphasise the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to stem the tide of irreparable harm to our natural resources. Market instruments that are designed to protect the global atmosphere are evaluated, along with carbon instruments and environmental tax incentives. Meanwhile, consideration is given to shifting the tax burden to achieve environmentally responsible outcomes, balancing sustainable use and natural resource protection, and protecting water resources.

Offering a comprehensive appraisal of market instruments and policy solutions for natural resource protection, this book is ideal for both policy makers and students and academics of environmental law, economics and sustainability.
‘Market Instruments and the Protection of Natural Resources is an interesting contribution to the literature on the use of economic instruments to address climate change, water pollution and natural resource management. The book contains a lot of factual information and touches upon a number of issues that can stimulate further debates. Geographically the book includes many concrete examples from both the Northern and Southern hemispheres.’
– Nils Axel Braathen, OECD Environment Directorate, France

‘The good management of vital natural resources is a key challenge for the future of both our wellbeing and our economies. The editors of this state-of-the-art volume have skillfully mapped out many of the key issues, with a comprehensive breadth of insights from a diverse, experienced, international and well-qualified group of contributors. This book is essential reading for those seeking a multifaceted and global assessment of the role of market and fiscal instruments in protecting natural resources.’
– Michael D'Ascenzo, ATO, Australia
Contributors: K. Bubna-Litic, B. Butcher, M.M. Callison, M. Cao, A.C. Cerqueira Duque, J. Cottrell, E. de Lemos Pinto Aydos, M. Dobranschi, F. Fortier, W. Gumley, M.L. Hymel, V. Johnston, C. Kettner, L. Kreiser, P. Lee, A. Lerch, D. Nerudova, S. Palassis, S. Rudolph, K. Schlegelmilch, H. Sprohge, R. Tavallali











Contents:

Preface

Part I Balancing Sustainable Use and Natural Resource Protection
1. The Use of Market Based Instruments in Protecting South Australia’s Marine Protected Areas
Karen Bubna-Litic

2. A Bottom Up Approach to Developing REDD+ Programs in Brazilian States and California
Ana Carolina Cerqueira Duque

3. Sowing the Seed of Change: Why Australia’s Land Sector Needs a Carbon Price to Encourage Mitigation of GHG Emissions and Promote Sustainable Land Use
Vanessa Johnston

Part II Protecting Water Resources
4. Fighting for Water: The Role of Federal Market Instruments in Addressing Water Issues the United States
Mona L. Hymel

5. The Impact of Hydraulic Fracturing on Fresh Water Resources in the United States
Hans Sprohge, Bill Butcher and Mary Margaret Callison and Larry Kreiser

6. Policy Instruments to Support Water Conservation and Support the Ecosystem: A California Example
Rahmat Tavallali and Paul Lee

Part III Shifting the Tax Burden to Effect Environmentally Responsible Outcomes
7. From Fossil Fuels to Renewable Energy: Subsidy Reform and Energy Transitions in African and Indian Ocean Island States
Kai Schlegelmilch, Jacqueline Cottrell and Francois Fortier

8. Using Environmental Taxation to Improve Outcomes for e-waste in Australia
Wayne Gumley

9. The Ad Unit and Ad Valorem Tax Burden Shifting and Its Impact on Pigovian Taxation in the European Union Member States
Danuse Nerudova and Marian Dobranschi

Part IV Evaluating Instruments that Protect the Global Atmosphere
10. Carbon Trading or Carbon Tax: Which is the More Feasible Solution to Climate Change from the perspective of China?
Mingde Cao

11. Regulation of Ship-Sourced Carbon Dioxide Emissions: The Creation of Economic Instruments
Stathis Palassis

12. Sectoral Allocation Patterns in the EU Emission Trading Scheme: Empirical Evidence and Outlook
Claudia Kettner

13. Paris: The Dilemmas of International Climate Change Negotiations and the Role for Linked Emissions Trading Schemes in the Post 2020 Regime
Elena de Lemos Pinto Aydos

14. Just ETS? Social Justice and Recent Reforms in EU and US Carbon Markets
Achim Lerch and Sven Rudolph

Index