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Negotiating Climate Change

A Forensic Analysis Aynsley Kellow, Professor, School of Social Sciences, University of Tasmania, Australia
This book examines how an error in global meta-policy set climate change negotiations on an unproductive course. The decision to base negotiations on the Montreal Protocol and overlook the importance of interests, it argues, institutionalised an approach doomed to fail. By analysing interests, science and norms in the process, and the neglect of ‘interactive minilateralism’, learning was delayed until the more promising Paris Agreement was finally concluded, only to encounter a Trump Presidency, which (ironically) might offer further learning opportunities.
Extent: c 192 pp
Hardback Price: $110.00 Web: $99.00
Publication Date: March 2018
ISBN: 978 1 78643 820 1
Availability: Not yet published
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  • eISBN: 978 1 78643 821 8

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  • Environment
  • Climate Change
  • Environmental Governance and Regulation
  • Environmental Politics and Policy
  • Politics and Public Policy
  • Environmental Governance and Regulation
  • Environmental Politics and Policy
  • International Relations
The 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change marked a reset of global climate policy, but was jeopardised by the partisan nature of the debates. In this unique overview Aynsley Kellow suggests that global policy on climate change should have started with the Paris Agreement, and that almost a quarter of a century has been wasted following the wrong path for the development of global policy.

Looking critically at the interplay between interests, science, and global norms, Negotiating Climate Change shows how the initial selection of the wrong ‘metapolicy’ hindered the development of global climate policy. Examining key debates, and the problems which arose from them Kellow exposes the failings of the Kyoto Process and the subsequent problems which arose in the negotiations which culminated in the Paris Agreement.

Providing analysis of the failings of the past decades as well as looking towards the future of climate policy, this book will be invaluable for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students of global environmental politics, environmental governance and international relations, as well as for policy workers in agencies with involvement in climate policy.
Contents: Preface 1. Metapolicy and Global Climate Policy 2. Business Interests, Energy Competition, and Climate Change 3. Climate Science, Problem Definition and Agenda Setting 4. Norms in Climate Negotiations 5. Minilateralism and Forum Shopping: Negotiations and Multiple Arenas 6. Paris: The End – or a New Beginning? References Index