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Political Governance in China

Edited by Tony Saich, Daewoo Professor of International Affairs and Director, Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard University, US
Including key research articles from specialists in the field, this volume provides an introduction and critical insights into the most important debates surrounding the governance of contemporary China. The material will enable readers to understand how China is ruled, how participation and protest are regulated by the authorities, and the relationship between the Central state and its local agencies. Spanning the most important areas of the subject, the chosen articles explore the study of Chinese politics, the nature of the Chinese political system, the policy-making process, the nature of the local state, participation and protest, and authoritarian resilience or democratization.

Professor Saich’s collection brings together essential reading for students of China, those who are interested in comparative politics and the general reader who wants a coherent introduction about how China is ruled.
Extent: 768 pp
Hardback Price: $399.95 Web: $359.95
Publication Date: 2015
ISBN: 978 1 78195 383 9
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  • Asian Studies
  • Asian Politics and Policy
  • Politics and Public Policy
  • Regulation and Governance
Including key research articles from specialists in the field, this volume provides an introduction and critical insights into the most important debates surrounding the governance of contemporary China. The material will enable readers to understand how China is ruled, how participation and protest are regulated by the authorities, and the relationship between the Central state and its local agencies. Spanning the most important areas of the subject, the chosen articles explore the study of Chinese politics, the nature of the Chinese political system, the policy-making process, the nature of the local state, participation and protest, and authoritarian resilience or democratization.

Professor Saich’s collection brings together essential reading for students of China, those who are interested in comparative politics and the general reader who wants a coherent introduction about how China is ruled.
33 articles, dating from 1992 to 2013
Contributors include: D.S.G. Goodman, M. Manion, A.C. Mertha, A.J. Nathan, B. Naughton, K.J. O’Brien, J. C. Oi, E.J. Perry, V. Shih, L.L. Tsai

Contents:

Acknowledgements

Introduction Tony Saich

PART I THE STUDY OF CHINESE POLITICS
1. Elizabeth J. Perry (2007) ‘Studying Chinese Politics: Farewell to Revolution?’, China Journal, 57, January, 1–22

2. Kevin J. O’Brien (2011), ‘Studying Chinese Politics in an Age of Specialization’, Journal of Contemporary China, 20 (71), September, 535–41

3. Gunter Schubert (2008), ‘One-Party Rule and the Question of Legitimacy in Contemporary China: Preliminary Thoughts on Setting Up a New Research Agenda’, Journal of Contemporary China, 17 (54), February, 191–204

PART II THE NATURE OF THE CHINESE POLITICAL SYSTEM
4. Minglu Chen and David S.G. Goodman (2012), ‘The China Model: One Country, Six Authors’, Journal of Contemporary China, 21 (73), January, 169–85

5. Jude Howell (2006), ‘Reflections on the Chinese State’, Development and Change, 37 (2), March, 273–97

6. Steve Tsang (2009), ‘Consultative Leninism: China’s New Political Framework’, Journal of Contemporary China, 18 (62), November, 865–80

7. Kellee S. Tsai (2006), ‘Adaptive Informal Institutions and Endogenous Institutional Change in China’, World Politics, 59 (1), October, 116–41

8. Barry Naughton (2010), ‘China’s Distinctive System: Can It Be a Model for Others?’, Journal of Contemporary China, 19 (65), June, 437–60

PART III THE POLICY-MAKING PROCESS
9. Sebastian Heilmann (2008), ‘Policy Experimentation in China’s Economic Rise’, Studies in Comparative International Development, 43, March, 1–26

10. Gabriella Montinola, Yingyi Qian, and Barry R. Weingast (1995), ‘Federalism, Chinese Style: The Political Basis for Economic Success in China’, World Politics, 48 (1), October, 50–81

11. Hongbin Cai and Daniel Treisman (2006), ‘Did Government Decentralization Cause China’s Economic Miracle?’, World Politics, 58 (4), July, 505–35

12. Andrew C. Mertha (2005), ‘China’s “Soft” Centralization: Shifting Tiao/Kuai Authority Relations’, China Quarterly, 184, December, 791–810

13. Andrew Mertha (2009), ‘“Fragmented Authoritarianism 2.0”: Political Pluralization in the Chinese Policy Process’, China Quarterly, 200, December, 995–1012

PART IV THE NATURE OF THE LOCAL STATE
14. Jean C. Oi (1992), ‘Fiscal Reform and the Economic Foundations of Local State Corporatism in China’, World Politics, 45 (1), October, 99–126

15. Tony Saich (2002), ‘The Blind Man and the Elephant: Analysing the Local State in China’, in Luigi Tomba (ed.), East Asian Capitalism: Conflicts, Growth and Crisis, Milan, Italy: Fondazione Giangiacomo Feltrinelli, 75–99

16. Lily L. Tsai (2007), ‘Solidary Groups, Informal Accountability, and Local Public Goods Provision in Rural China’, American Political
Science Review, 101 (2), May, 355–72

17. Graeme Smith (2010), ‘The Hollow State: Rural Governance in China’, China Quarterly, 203, September, 601–18

18. Victor Shih, Christopher Adolph and Mingxing Liu (2012), ‘Getting Ahead in the Communist Party: Explaining the Advancement of Central Committee Members in China’, American Political Science Review, 106 (1), February, 166–87

19. Tony Saich (2012), ‘The Quality of Governance in China: The Citizens’ View’, Harvard Kennedy School, Faculty Research Working Paper Series, RWP12-051, i, 1–41

PART V PARTICIPATION AND PROTEST
20. Tony Saich (2006), ‘Negotiating the State: The Development of Social Organizations in China’, in Lowell Dittmer and Guoli Liu (eds), China’s Deep Reform: Domestic Politics in Transition, Chapter 10, Lanham, MD, USA: Rowman and Littlefield, 285–301

21. Jessica C. Teets (2013), ‘Let Many Civil Societies Bloom: The Rise of Consultative Authoritarianism in China’, China Quarterly, 213, March, 19–38

22. Patricia M. Thornton (2013), ‘The Advance of the Party: Transformation or Takeover of Urban Grassroots Society?’, China Quarterly, 213, March, 1–18

23. Melanie Manion (2006), ‘Democracy, Community, Trust: The Impact of Elections in Rural China’, Comparative Political Studies, 39 (3), April, 301–23

24. Pierre F. Landry, Deborah Davis and Shiru Wang (2010), ‘Elections in Rural China: Competition Without Parties’, Comparative Political Studies, 43 (6), June, 763–90

25. Kevin J. O’Brien and Rongbin Han (2009), ‘Path to Democracy? Assessing Village Elections in China’, Journal of Contemporary China, 18 (60), June, 359–78

26. Tony Saich and Xuedong Yang (2003), ‘Innovation in China’s Local Governance: “Open Recommendation and Selection”’, Pacific Affairs, 76 (2), Summer, 185–208

27. Yongshun Cai (2008), ‘Power Structure and Regime Resilience: Contentious Politics in China’, British Journal of Political Science, 38 (3), July, 411–32

28. Lianjiang Li (2010), ‘Rights Consciousness and Rules Consciousness in Contemporary China’, China Journal, 64, July, 47–68

29. Elizabeth J. Perry (2008), ‘Chinese Conceptions of “Rights”: From Mencius to Mao—and Now’, Perspectives on Politics, 6 (1), March,
37–50

PART VI AUTHORITARIAN RESILIENCE OR DEMOCRATIZATION
30. Andrew J. Nathan (2003), ‘Authoritarian Resilience’, Journal of Democracy, 14 (1), January, 6–17

31. Bruce J. Dickson (2006), ‘Cooptation and Corporatism in China: The Logic of Party Adaptation’, in Lowell Dittmer and Guoli Liu (eds), China’s Deep Reform: Domestic Politics in Transition, Chapter 4, Lanham, MD, USA: Rowman and Littlefield, 119–43

32. Henry S. Rowen (2007), ‘When Will the Chinese People Be Free?’, Journal of Democracy, 18 (3), July, 38–52

33. Cheng Li (2012), ‘The End of the CCP’s Resilient Authoritarianism? A Tripartite Assessment of Shifting Power in China’, China Quarterly, September, 595–623

Index