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Public Private Partnership for WTO Dispute Settlement

Enabling Developing Countries Amrita Bahri, Assistant Professor of Law, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM), Mexico
Public Private Partnership for WTO Dispute Settlement is an interdisciplinary work examining the growing interaction between business entities and public officials. Crucially, it identifies how this relationship can enable developing countries to effectively utilize the provisions of the World Trade Organization Dispute Settlement Understanding (WTO DSU).
Extent: c 288 pp
Hardback Price: $135.00 Web: $121.50
Publication Date: February 2018
ISBN: 978 1 78643 748 8
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  • eISBN: 978 1 78643 749 5

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  • Development Studies
  • Development Studies
  • Law and Development
  • Law - Academic
  • Arbitration and Dispute Resolution
  • Law and Development
  • International Economic Law, Trade Law
  • Law - Professional
  • Arbitration, Litigation, Dispute Resolution
  • International Economic Law, Trade Law
Public Private Partnership for WTO Dispute Settlement is an interdisciplinary work examining the growing interaction between business entities and public officials. Crucially, it identifies how this relationship can enable developing countries to effectively utilize the provisions of the World Trade Organization Dispute Settlement Understanding (WTO DSU).

Building on more than five years of empirical investigation, Amrita Bahri reflects on the dispute settlement partnership experiences of the top DSU users from the developed and developing world. This enables her to evaluate a diverse range of dispute settlement partnership strategies, which have allowed the governments involved to harness resources and expertise from the private sector.

With practical suggestions on dispute settlement capacity building, this book provides a roadmap to policymakers, industry representatives and legal professionals on how to effectively engage with business entities for the resolution of international trade conflicts. It also provides a template for teaching and research activities to scholars focusing on international trade law, development studies and international dispute settlement.
‘This book is a tremendous and timely contribution to the existing scholarship on law and development. Based on the full internalization of the literature, on painstaking empirical analysis and on an enriching comparative analysis, it explores the obstacles developing countries face in participating in legal institutions and suggests the strategies and synergies they can deploy to overcome them. The ultimate value of this strong project, not to be underscored in these critical times, is that legal institutions matter and can represent an important factor in shaping development.’
– Luca Rubini, Birmingham Law School, UK

‘This is a stimulating comparison of how governments in developed countries (the United States and the EU) and in key developing countries (Brazil, China and India) have been handling their industries’ complaints about foreign trade barriers. The lessons drawn in this study, on how such cooperation could be formalized and possibly improved from a developing country perspective, are worthwhile. Deserves a wide readership.’
– Marco Bronckers, Leiden University, the Netherlands

‘Extremely insightful and groundbreaking book based on comprehensive and rigorous research. Its admirable treatment of public private partnership in WTO disputes would attract policymakers, industry, legal professionals and the academic community. Incisive recommendations made by the author provide an effective template for countries to engage purposefully for resolving trade friction.’
– Abhijit Das, Indian Institute of Foreign Trade, India
Contents: Introduction 1. Developing Countries at WTO Dispute Settlement Understanding: Strengthening Participation 2. WTO Dispute Settlement Partnerships: A Conceptual Framework 3. Handling of WTO Disputes: The United States and the European Union 4. Handling of WTO Disputes: China’s Experience 5. Handling of WTO Disputes: Brazil’s Experience 6. Handling of WTO Disputes: India’s Experience 7. Devising Dispute Settlement Partnerships: “Lessons Learnt” Conclusion Bibliography Index