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Regulatory Autonomy and International Trade in Services

The EU Under GATS and RTAs Bregt Natens, Associate, Sidley Austin LLP, Brussels
This book considers how the interplay between multilateral and preferential liberalisation of trade in services increasingly raises concerns, both from the perspective of the beneficiaries of such liberalisation (whose rights are uncertain) and that of regulators (whose regulatory autonomy is constrained). The author shows how these concerns lead to vast underutilisation of, and strong prejudices against, the benefits of services liberalisation. The book meticulously analyses and compares the EU's obligations under the GATS and the services chapters of several RTAs to finally assess the merits of the raised concerns.
Extent: 352 pp
Hardback Price: $145.00 Web: $130.50
Publication Date: 2016
ISBN: 978 1 78536 430 3
Availability: In Stock
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  • Law - Academic
  • European Law
  • Regulation and Governance
  • International Economic Law, Trade Law
Despite its growing significance, the legal scrutiny of RTAs remains an underdeveloped academic field. This book considers how the interplay between multilateral and preferential liberalisation of trade in services increasingly raises concerns, both from the perspective of the beneficiaries of such liberalisation and that of regulators.

With the application of a thorough article-by-article analysis, the author shows how these concerns lead to vast underutilisation of, and often prejudice against, the benefits of services liberalisation. The book meticulously analyses and compares the EU’s obligations under the GATS and the services chapters of several RTAs to finally assess the merits of the various concerns.

This book will be an invaluable resource for students and scholars of law and related subjects. It will also be of interest to government officials looking for a detailed analysis of the topic, and practitioners looking for a framework for analysing RTA provisions.
‘Trade integration in today’s world is largely a question of addressing divergent regulations, and services liberalization is at the apex of the discussion. For various reasons this issue is easier to address in clubs. The WTO is getting to grips with this emerging reality, and this book is a very timely contribution to what promises to be the motto in trade circles in the years to come.’
– Petros C. Mavroidis, Columbia University, Law School, US
Contents: Introduction 1. Interpretation of GATS and the Selected EU RTAs 2. Structure of GATS and the Selected EU RTAs 3. The Scope of GATS and the Selected EU RTAs 4. Non-discrimination 5. Market Access 6. Domestic Regulation 7. Transparency 8. Exceptions Concluding Remarks Index