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Reimagining Home in the 21st Century

Edited by Justine Lloyd and Ellie Vasta, Department of Sociology, Macquarie University, Australia
Providing ways of reimagining home, this book demonstrates that thinking differently about home advances our understanding of processes of belonging. Authors in this collection explore home in relation to the figure of the stranger and public space, as well as with a focus on practices of dwelling and materialities. Through these frameworks, the collection as whole suggests that our home does not ‘belong’ to us, rather we ‘belong’ to home.
Extent: 264 pp
Hardback Price: $135.00 Web: $121.50
Publication Date: 2017
ISBN: 978 1 78643 292 6
Availability: In Stock
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  • Geography
  • Human Geography
  • Social and Cultural Geography
  • Social Policy and Sociology
  • Family and Gender Policy
  • Migration
  • Sociology and Sociological Theory
Asking us to think differently about the home, this book challenges the notion of a closed-off and self-sufficient place and reimagines home to be where we find our connections to others and the world. By exploring home in relation to the figure of the stranger and public space, as well as with a focus on practices of dwelling and materialities, the authors demonstrate that thinking differently about home advances our understanding of belonging as a social process in which we are all implicated.

Interrelated chapters challenge traditional, convenient and stereotypical notions of ‘home’. Specifically, the book provides a state-of-the-art cross-disciplinary conceptual framework; contributes to national and international discussions on the changing economic and social meanings of home; and provides analysis of areas and locations that are rarely thought of as involved in ‘home-making’, e.g. man caves; mobile homes; the home in public; senses of home; the migrant citizen/stranger.

This book is an essential resource for those involved in housing policy, issues around migration policies and to researchers working in other arenas such as cultural heritage. It is of particular interest to academics of sociology, anthropology and cultural studies, and those whose research investigates questions of domestic space and the politics of home.
‘This book is unsettling, in the most enjoyable way. “Home” has long been a scholarly obsession, but where others try to pin down its “meaning”, this collection revels in its multiplicity. By viewing home-making as practiced and mobile, these essays emphasise the ‘interactional achievement’ of people, spaces and things. It examines its scale – from man-caves to nations – its spatiality – on public transport as much as in residences – and its temporality – as constant re-creation. This approach flags the contradictory and ambivalent nature of home-making as individual and collective projects of identity. In a world marked by a “crisis of home”, this collection examines the relation between agency and power as we struggle for coherence and continuity.’
– Greg Noble, University of Western Sydney, Australia

‘From “man caves” to commuter cars, “smart houses” to convivial kitchens, Reimagining Home in the 21st Century provides a rich and engaging window into the diverse lifeworlds that characterise the 21st Century.’
– Katherine Brickell, Royal Holloway, University of London, UK

‘Reimagining Home in the 21st Century is a timely book that addresses key themes of 21st century life; about where we belong, how we shape our present, imagine our future and are shaped by the mobility and migrations of those both close to us and more culturally distant. An invaluable contribution that sheds light on both the way we live now and the concepts we use to make sense of our time.’
– Michael Keith, University of Oxford, UK

‘Justine Lloyd and Ellie Vasta have done a fantastic job as editors in bringing together a group of critically minded scholars to write chapters on the meanings, practices and representations of home during a period of rapid social change. I have no doubt that Reimagining Home in the 21st Century will make an important contribution to academic scholarship by showcasing the considerable insights that can be achieved by interdisciplinary forms of inquiry.’
– Keith Jacobs, University of Tasmania, Australia
Contributors: A. Ålund, J. Browitt, A. Deslandes, N. Ebert, M. Giuffre, O. Hamilton, E. Honeywill, J. Humphry, L. Kings, J. Lloyd, Y. Musharbash, S. Redshaw, C.-U. Schierup, A. Stebbing, S. Supski, I. Vanni Accarigi, E. Vasta






Contents:

1. Introduction: Reimagining Home in the 21st Century
Justine Lloyd and Ellie Vasta

PART I Home-making and belonging: The Figure of the Stranger
2. Reflections on home and identity in late-modernity
Norbert Ebert

3. The migrant ‘stranger’ at home: ‘Australian’ shared Values and the National Imaginary
Ellie Vasta

PART II Home-making and belonging: Practices of dwelling
4. The transnational matrifocal home among Cape Verdean migrant women: The case of Santo Antão Island
Martina Giuffrè

5. Country’, ‘community’ and ‘growth town’: three spatio-temporal snapshots of Warlpiri experiences of home
Yasmine Musharbash

6. Mobile my spaces: home in commuter cars, working vehicles and contrasting dwelling for backpackers in campervans and homeless car sleepers
Sarah Redshaw

7. Without house or home? Understanding homelessness as dwelling
Adam Stebbing

PART III Conditions of homeliness/unhomeliness: Publicness
8. At home in public: The work of mobility and anti-racist mobile witnessing practices
Justine Lloyd

9. Home-making: youth and urban unrest in multiethnic Sweden
Aleksandra Ålund, Carl-Ulrik Schierup and Lisa Kings

10. The coming home of postindustrial society
Evelyn Honeywill

11. Staying in place: meanings, practices and the regulation of publicness in Sydney’s Martin Place
Ann Deslandes and Justine Humphry

PART IV Conditions and practices of homeliness/unhomeliness: Materialities
12. Senses of home
Olivia Hamilton

13. Transcultural objects, transcultural homes
Ilaria Vanni Accarigi

14. The garage as vernacular museum: reading contemporary masculinity through ‘man caves’
Jeff Browitt

15. Kitchen as home: Shifting meanings
Sian Supski

Index