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Research Handbook on Corporate Social Responsibility in Context

Edited by Anders Örtenblad, Professor of Organization and Leadership, Faculty of Social Sciences, Nord University, Norway
Is corporate social responsibility (CSR) a universal idea? Is the same exact definition of CSR relevant for any organization, regardless of context? Or would such a definition need to be adapted to fit different types of organizations, in different cultures, industries and sectors? This book discusses how CSR preferably should be practiced in various generalized contexts. Experts share their knowledge on whether a broad definition of CSR can be practiced as is or if it first has to undergo changes, in as various generalized contexts as Buddhist and Islamic organizations, developing countries, the food processing industry, the shipping industry, and the pharmaceutical industry.
Extent: 432 pp
Hardback Price: $225.00 Web: $202.50
Publication Date: 2016
ISBN: 978 1 78347 479 0
Availability: In Stock
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  • Business and Management
  • Corporate Social Responsibility
  • Critical Management Studies
  • Marketing
  • Organisation Studies
Is corporate social responsibility (CSR) a universal idea? Is the same exact definition of CSR relevant for any organization, regardless of context? Or would such a definition need to be adapted to fit different types of organizations, in different cultures, industries and sectors? This book discusses how CSR should preferably be practiced. The expert authors share their knowledge on whether a broad definition of CSR can be practiced as is or if it first has to undergo changes to suit the context.

The leading group of contributors argues that anyone wishing to adopt the CSR idea in their organization needs to take the context into account and, thus, find a version of CSR that fits the specific industry, sector, national culture, religion and so on, in which the organization exists. The book discusses the universality of CSR and includes a comparison of the relevance of a broad, general definition of CSR for organizations in contexts such as Buddhism and Islam, developing countries and the food processing, shipping and pharmaceutical industries. Guidelines for conducting studies on the examination of the relevance of CSR for organizations in any particular generalized context are also provided.

Academics, students and practitioners involved in the fresh field of CSR will find this an essential resource.
‘It is inspiring to see an innovative volume that focuses on the concept and variety of corporate social responsibility (CSR) frameworks, as conceptualized and manifested in a range of contexts – religious affiliation, level of economic development, continent, industry, and mixtures of these variables. The Handbook concludes with a thought-provoking proposal for CSR as a contingent universalist idea. This book should be essential reading by novice and mature scholars as well as inquisitive practitioners striving to ascertain how CSR is relevant and applicable to their own environments.’
– Archie B. Carroll, University of Georgia, US

‘This book demonstrates, once and for all, that there is no one-size-fits-all approach to corporate social responsibility, and that it can only be understood and implemented in context. Drawing from a wide range of scholars across different countries and specialisms, it provides some unique perspectives that take the literature in new and interesting directions’
– Andrew Crane, York University, Canada
Contributors: A. Ahmad, T. Aroni, A. Athanasopoulou, F. Azmat, W.L. Chan, J.E.-T. Cheah, D.K. Davidson, I. Fafaliou, S. Görpe, P. Gottschalk, G.M. Hall, J.M. Hansen, M. Z. Haque, S.-w. Hsu, D. Jamali, C. Karam, M. Lekakou, L. Montanheiro, B. Öksüz, A. Örtenblad, P. Perry, P. Reinmoeller, J.W. Selsky, E. Stefanidaki, I. Theotokas, W. Visser, J. Weikert
Contents:

Preface

PART I. BACKGROUND AND INTRODUCTION
1. Introduction: Establishing the Art of Contextualizing CSR as a Research Area
Anders Örtenblad

2. Corporate Social Responsibility as Concept and Activity: An Overview
Serra Görpe and Burcu Öksüz

3. The Importance of Context in Understanding CSR
D. Kirk Davidson

4. The Social Context in CSR Research: A Contextualist Approach with Critical Applications
Andromachi Athanasopoulou and John W. Selsky

PART II. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN CONTEXT
Section A Religion/Level of Economic Development/Continent

5. Islamic and Buddhist Perspectives of Corporate Social Responsibility
Patsy Perry and Aini Ahmad

6. CSR in Developed versus Developing Countries: A Comparative Glimpse
Dima Jamali and Charlotte Karam

7. Does Diffusion Cover Differentiation? Looking into Corporate Social Responsibility in Asia
Patrick Reinmoeller

Section B Industry
8. Corporate Social Responsibility in Food Processing Industry
George Michael Hall

9. Corporate Social Responsibility in Shipping Industry
Maria Lekakou, Ioannis Theotokas and Evangelia Stefanidaki

10. Corporate Social Responsibility in the Pharmaceutical Industry
Wen Li Chan, Jeremy Eng Tuck Cheah and Luiz Montanheiro

Section C Mixed Contexts
11. Corporate Social Responsibility in the Ready Made Garments Industry in Bangladesh
Fara Azmat and Mohammed Ziaul Haque

12. Corporate Social Responsibility in the Greek Shipping Business
Irene Fafaliou and Tina Aroni

13. Corporate Social Responsibility in the Turkish Pharmaceutical Industry
Serra Görpe and Burcu Öksüz

Section D Specific Situation
14. The Relevance of CSR in the Case of Insurance Firm and Motorcycle Gang in Norway
Petter Gottschalk

15. Fraud Examiners in White-collar Crime Investigations
Petter Gottschalk

PART III. COMMENTS AND REFLECTIONS
16. Reflections on the Universality and Philosophical Foundations of the ‘Corporate Social Responsibility’ Definition
Jared M. Hansen

17. A Comment on the Use of the Seven Aspects of CSR
Jochen Weikert

18. Stages of Corporate Social Responsibility
Petter Gottschalk

19. The Future of CSR: Towards Transformative CSR, or CSR 2.0
Wayne Visser

20. Against CSR: The Meaning and Meaninglessness of CSR in China
Shih-wei Hsu

21. Conclusions, A Contingency Model of CSR and Recommendations for Further Research
Anders Örtenblad

Index