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Teaching Pluralism in Economics

Edited by John Groenewegen, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
This volume is concerned with the different schools within the discipline of economics (theoretical pluralism) and the relationship of economics to other disciplines, such as sociology, political science and philosophy (interdisciplinarity). It addresses the important implications of pluralism and interdisciplinarity for teaching economics at both undergraduate and graduate level and argues that the economics curriculum should pay equal attention to these new perspectives rather than concentrate on the traditional neoclassical mainstream.
In Association with the Belgian-Dutch Association for Institutional and Political Economy
Extent: 256 pp
Hardback Price: £80.00 Web: £72.00
Publication Date: 2007
ISBN: 978 1 84542 305 6
Availability: In Stock
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  • Economics and Finance
  • Evolutionary Economics
  • Teaching Economics
  • Education
  • Teaching and Learning
This volume is concerned with the different schools within the discipline of economics (theoretical pluralism) and the relationship of economics to other disciplines, such as sociology, political science and philosophy (interdisciplinarity). It addresses the important implications of pluralism and interdisciplinarity for teaching economics at both undergraduate and graduate level and argues that the economics curriculum should pay equal attention to these new perspectives rather than concentrate on the traditional neoclassical mainstream.

The distinguished contributors highlight the inherent challenges of presenting a combination of mainstream economics with more heterodox approaches in such a way that the student is not confused, but better understands the possibilities and limitations of different schools in economics. They go on to demonstrate how to apply these different approaches and show how a more inter-disciplinary approach can be followed once the boundaries of the economics discipline have been reached. The volume attempts to offer insights into the content of such a revised curriculum and the process of how to achieve this.

This book will be required reading for every serious teacher and student of economics. It will also be invaluable to anyone who questions the validity of current economic orthodoxy.
‘At once visionary and pragmatic, its 11 essays address how and why economic education ought to be pluralistic, and the pedagogical and institutional challenges of making it pluralistic. . . this collection lays valuable groundwork for conversation among economic educators, orthodox and heterodox, about the ends and means of graduate and undergraduate education.’
– Robert Garnett, Eastern Economic Journal

‘This book succeeds in its goal: teaching pluralism in economics. Read it as a call for multiple approaches and perspectives in economics. Its contributions are not only refreshing but also critical and insightful. If anyone wonders what pluralism in economics is all about, this is the book to reach for.’
– Arjo Klamer, Erasmus University, The Netherlands

‘A number of rival schools of thought exist in economics today. Even mainstream economics has fragmented into different approaches. Multiple connections exist between economics and other disciplines. Not only is this story complicated, but also it has major implications for any well-rounded education in economics. This book faces up to these problems squarely, combining insights on the current fragmentation of economics with useful discussions of the implications for the economics curriculum in universities. Only the blinkered and the narrow-minded will fail to see the enormous value of this discussion.’
– Geoffrey M. Hodgson, University of Hertfordshire, UK
Contributors: S.C. Dow, W. Elsner, J. Groenewegen, H. Jager, A. Jolink, R. Knaack, W. Lemstra, R. Simonetti, D. Underwood, H.P. van Dalen, J. Vromen, R. Weehuizen
Contents:

1. On Pluralism and Interdisciplinarity in Economics
John Groenewegen

2. Pluralism in Economics
Sheila C. Dow

3. Pluralism in Economics: A Public Good or a Public Bad?
Hendrik P. van Dalen

4. In Praise of Moderate Plurality
Jack Vromen

5. Preaching to the Econ-verted: Why History also Matters
Albert Jolink

6. The Impact of the Economics Benchmarking Statement on Pluralism
in Economics Teaching in the UK
Roberto Simonetti

7. The Principles of Economics: An American’s Experience
Daniel Underwood

8. A Practitioner’s Perspective on Interdisciplinarity in Education: The
MBT Case
Wolter Lemstra

9. Interdisciplinarity and Problem-based Learning in Economics
Education: The Case of Infonomics
Rifka Weehuizen

10. Heterodox Economics and its Integration in Pluralist Teaching: A
German Case
Wolfram Elsner

11. On the Relevancy of Institutional Economics for International
Economics
Ruud Knaack and Henk Jager

Index