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The Economics of Open Access

On the Future of Academic Publishing Thomas Eger, Professor Emeritus of Law and Economics, University of Hamburg and Marc Scheufen, Senior Research Fellow, Law Faculty, Ruhr University of Bochum, Germany
Addressing the recent debate on how the future of academic publishing might look in a purely digital environment, this book analyzes the experiences of researchers with, as well as attitudes towards, “Open Access” (OA) publishing. Drawing on a unique, in-depth survey with more than 10,000 respondents from 25 countries, Thomas Eger and Marc Scheufen discuss their findings in the light of recent policy attempts which have been trying to foster OA, revealing considerable shortcomings and lack of knowledge on fundamental features of the academic publishing market.
Extent: c 176 pp
Hardback Price: $105.00 Web: $94.50
Publication Date: June 2018
ISBN: 978 1 78536 575 1
Availability: Not yet published
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  • eISBN: 978 1 78536 576 8

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  • Economics and Finance
  • Law and Economics
  • Law - Academic
  • Information and Media Law
  • Law and Economics
The increasing shift towards digital publishing has provoked much debate concerning the issues surrounding ‘Open Access’ (OA), including its economic implications. This timely book considers how the future of academic publishing might look in a purely digital environment and utilises unique empirical data in order to analyze the experiences of researchers with, as well as attitudes towards, OA publishing.

Presenting findings from a novel, in-depth survey with more than 10,000 respondents from 25 countries, this book shows that the research culture of scientific research differs considerably between disciplines and countries. These differences significantly determine the role of both ‘gold’ and ‘green’ forms of OA and foster both opportunity and risk. Discussing their findings in the light of recent policy attempts to foster OA, Thomas Eger and Marc Scheufen reveal considerable shortcomings and lack of knowledge on fundamental features of the academic publishing market and conclude by highlighting a policy agenda for its future development.

Well-timed and far-reaching, this book will be of particular interest to students and scholars interested in the economic analysis of copyright law. Academic librarians and research sponsors will also benefit from the insights offered.
Contents: 1. Introduction 2. The Academic Publishing Market 3. An International Survey Analysis 4. Policy Implications and the Way Forward 5. Summary and Outlook 6. Appendices 7. References Index