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The Growth of Cities

Edited by Zoltán J. Ács, Professor, London School of Economics and Political Science and University Professor, School of Policy, Government and International Affairs, George Mason University, US
To understand why some regions grow and others stagnate, we need to understand the interactions between economic growth, economic geography and the economics of innovation. Each of these individual approaches has strengths and weaknesses, but when integrated it is possible, as evidenced by this volume, to develop an appropriate model of technology-led regional economic development.
Extent: 672 pp
Hardback Price: £197.00 Web: £177.30
Publication Date: 2006
ISBN: 978 1 84376 640 7
Availability: In Stock
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  • Economics and Finance
  • Economics of Innovation
  • Regional Economics
  • Environment
  • Geography
  • Cities and Urban Geography
  • Economic Geography
  • Innovation and Technology
  • Economics of Innovation
  • Urban and Regional Studies
  • Cities
  • Regional Economics
To understand why some regions grow and others stagnate, we need to understand the interactions between economic growth, economic geography and the economics of innovation. Each of these individual approaches has strengths and weaknesses, but when integrated it is possible, as evidenced by this volume, to develop an appropriate model of technology-led regional economic development.

This authoritative collection presents a selection of key previously published articles which investigate these three perspectives. The volume explores the importance of human capital, entrepreneurship, clusters, and competition and public policy to the growth of cities.

The editor has written a new introduction which highlights the contribution of each article, and calls for a closer collaboration between economics and regional science in order to develop a new approach to the study of the growth of cities.
‘Contemporary cities are of at least two kinds: those that are vibrant and growing and those that are lagging. While this is nothing new the reasons are, at least in part, different than in past generations. This book is a collection of "modern classics" about the forces of growth in the late 20th and early 21st century in general and more specifically in agglomerated concentrations including cities. Human capital, agglomeration, knowledge spread or spillovers, industrial clusters, concentration of creative people, and global competition driven by a huge expansion of low cost labor and explosive innovation all play a role. The book provides most of the best material that has been published on these topics and their role in city growth and decline. It is a collection all students of the city and growth should have in their personal library.’
– Roger Stough, George Mason University, US
27 articles, dating from 1962 to 2004
Contributors include: K. Arrow, D. Audretsch, W.J. Baumol, E.L. Glaeser, A.B. Jaffe, P. Krugman, P. Nijkamp, P.M. Romer, J.A. Scheinkman, A. Shleifer
Contents:
Acknowledgements
Introduction Zoltan J. Acs
PART I ANALYTICAL OVERVIEW
1. Edward L. Glaeser (2000), ‘The New Economics of Urban and Regional Growth’
2. Peter Nijkamp and Jacques Poot (1998), ‘Spatial Perspectives on New Theories of Economic Growth’
PART II NEW ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY
3. Paul Krugman (1991), ‘Increasing Returns and Economic Geography’
4. Paul Krugman (1993), ‘First Nature, Second Nature, and Metropolitan Location’
5. Paul Krugman (1996), ‘Urban Concentration: The Role of Increasing Returns and Transport Costs’
PART III NEW GROWTH THEORY
6. Paul M. Romer (1986), ‘Increasing Returns and Long-Run Growth’
7. Paul M. Romer (1990), ‘Endogenous Technological Change’
8. Robert E. Lucas, Jr. (1988), ‘On the Mechanics of Economic Development’
PART IV KNOWLEDGE SPILLOVER IN CITIES
9. Adam B. Jaffe, Manuel Trajtenberg and Rebecca Henderson (1993), ‘Geographic Localization of Knowledge Spillovers as Evidenced by Patent Citations’
10. David B. Audretsch and Maryann P. Feldman (1996), ‘R&D Spillovers and the Geography of Innovation and Production’
11. Luc Anselin, Attila Varga and Zoltan Acs (1997), ‘Local Geographic Spillovers between University Research and High Technology Innovations’
PART V HUMAN CAPITAL AND THE GROWTH OF CITIES
12. Curtis J. Simon and Clark Nardinelli (1996), ‘The Talk of the Town: Human Capital, Information, and the Growth of English Cities, 1861 to 1961’
13. Edward L. Glaeser, José A. Scheinkman and Andrei Shleifer (1995), ‘Economic Growth in a Cross-Section of Cities’
14. James E. Rauch (1993), ‘Productivity Gains from Geographic Concentration of Human Capital: Evidence from the Cities’
15. Antonio Ciccone and Robert E. Hall (1996), ‘Productivity and the Density of Economic Activity’
PART VI DIVERSITY VS SPECIALIZATION IN CITIES
16. Edward L. Glaeser, Hedi D. Kallal, José A. Scheinkman and Andrei Shleifer (1992), ‘Growth in Cities’
17. Vernon Henderson, Ari Kuncoro and Matt Turner (1995), ‘Industrial Development in Cities’
18. Maryann P. Feldman and David B. Audretsch (1999), ‘Innovation in Cities: Science-Based Diversity, Specialization and Localized Competition’
PART VII ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND THE GROWTH OF CITIES
19. Claudio Michelacci (2003), ‘Low Returns in R&D due to the Lack of Entrepreneurial Skills’
20. Zoltan J. Acs and Catherine Armington (2004), ‘The Impact of Geographic Differences in Human Capital on Service Firm Formation Rates’
21. Sam Youl Lee, Richard Florida and Zoltan J. Acs (2004), ‘Creativity and Entrepreneurship: A Regional Analysis of New Firm Formation’
PART VIII CLUSTERS AND THE GROWTH OF CITIES
22. Timothy Bresnahan, Alfonso Gambardella and AnnaLee Saxenian (2001), ‘“Old Economy” Inputs for “New Economy” Outcomes: Cluster Formation in the New Silicon Valleys’
23. Philip Cooke (2002), ‘Biotechnology Clusters as Regional, Sectoral Innovation Systems’
24. Claus Steinle and Holger Schiele (2002), ‘When do Industries Cluster? A Proposal on How to Assess an Industry’s Propensity to Concentrate at a Single Region or Nation’
PART IX COMPETITION AND PUBLIC POLICY
25. Kenneth J. Arrow (1962), ‘Economic Welfare and the Allocation of Resources For Invention’
26. Michael E. Porter (1998), ‘Clusters and the New Economics of Competition’
27. William J. Baumol (2004), ‘Entrepreneurial Enterprises, Large Established Firms and Other Components of the Free-Market Growth Machine’
Name Index