Print page

A Modern Reader in Institutional and Evolutionary Economics

Key Concepts Edited by Geoffrey M. Hodgson, Research Professor in Business Studies, University of Hertfordshire, UK
In the 1990s, institutional and evolutionary economics emerged as one of the most creative and successful approaches in the modern social sciences. This timely reader gathers together seminal contributions from leading international authors in the field of institutional and evolutionary economics including Eileen Appelbaum, Benjamin Coriat, Giovanni Dosi, Sheila C. Dow, Bengt-åke Lundvall, Uskali Mäki, Bart Nooteboom and Marc R. Tool. The emphasis is on key concepts such as learning, trust, power, pricing and markets, with some essays devoted to methodology and others to the comparison of different forms of capitalism. An extensive introduction places the contributions in the context of the historical and theoretical background of
In Association with the European Association for Evolutionary Political Economy (EAEPE)
Extent: 272 pp
Hardback Price: $136.00 Web: $122.40
Publication Date: 2002
ISBN: 978 1 84064 474 6
Availability: In Stock
Paperback Price: $38.00 Web: $30.40
Publication Date: 2002
ISBN: 978 1 84064 495 1
Availability: In Stock
$0.00

Buy the E-Book @ paperback price

Join our mailing list

  • Economics and Finance
  • Evolutionary Economics
  • Institutional Economics
In the 1990s, institutional and evolutionary economics emerged as one of the most creative and successful approaches in the modern social sciences. This timely reader gathers together seminal contributions from leading international authors in the field of institutional and evolutionary economics including Eileen Appelbaum, Benjamin Coriat, Giovanni Dosi, Sheila C. Dow, Bengt-Åke Lundvall, Uskali Mäki, Bart Nooteboom and Marc R. Tool. The emphasis is on key concepts such as learning, trust, power, pricing and markets, with some essays devoted to methodology and others to the comparison of different forms of capitalism. An extensive introduction places the contributions in the context of the historical and theoretical background of recent developments in economics and the social sciences.

Essential reading for lecturers, researchers, graduates and advanced undergraduates in economics, business studies and sociology, this diverse yet complementary collection of essays will also find a broad readership amongst those wanting to understand the manifest changes apparent within modern socio-economic systems.
Contributors: E. Appelbaum, H. Berger, B. Chavance, B. Coriat, G. Dosi, S.C. Dow, S. Gloria-Palermo, G.M. Hodgson, B.-Å. Lundvall, E. Magnin, U. Mäki, N.G. Noorderhaven, B. Nooteboom, R. Schettkat, M.R. Tool, D. Young
Contents:

Introduction by Geoffrey M. Hodgson

I LEARNING, TRUST, POWER AND MARKETS
1 Marc R. Tool, ‘Contributions to an institutionalist theory of price determination’, in Geoffrey M. Hodgson and Ernesto Screpanti (eds) (1991), Rethinking Economics: Markets, Technology and Economic Evolution, Aldershot: Edward Elgar, pp. 19–39

2 Bengt-Åke Lundvall, ‘The learning economy: challenges to economic theory and policy’, in Klaus Nielsen and Björn Johnson (eds) (1998), Institutions and Economic Change: New Perspectives on Markets, Firms and Technology, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, pp. 33–54

3 David Young, ‘The meaning and role of power in economic theories’, in John Groenewegen, Christos Pitelis and Sven-Erik Sjöstrand (eds) (1995), On Economic Institutions: Theory and Applications, Aldershot: Edward Elgar, pp. 85–100

4 Sandye Gloria-Palermo, ‘Discovery versus creation: implications of the Austrian view of the market process’, in John Groenewegen and Jack Vromen (eds) (1999), Institutions and the Evolution of Capitalism: Implications of Evolutionary Economics, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, pp. 78–91

5 Hans Berger, Niels G. Noorderhaven and Bart Nooteboom, ‘Determinants of supplier dependence: an empirical study’, in John Groenewegen, Christos Pitelis and Sven-Erik Sjöstrand (eds) (1995), On Economic Institutions: Theory and Applications, Aldershot: Edward Elgar, pp. 195–212

II PLURALISM AND COMPARATIVE PARADIGMS
6 Benjamin Coriat and Giovanni Dosi, ‘The institutional embeddedness of economic change: an appraisal of the “evolutionary” and “regulationist” research programmes’, in Klaus Nielsen and Björn Johnson (eds) (1998), Institutions and Economic Change: New Perspectives on Markets, Firms
and Technology, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, pp. 3–32

7 Uskali Mäki, ‘The one world and the many theories’, in Andrea Salanti and Ernesto Screpanti (eds) (1997), Pluralism in Economics: New Perspectives in History and Methodology, Aldershot: Edward Elgar, pp. 37–47

8 Sheila C. Dow (1997), ‘Methodological pluralism and pluralism of method’, in Andrea Salanti and Ernesto Screpanti (eds) (1997), Pluralism in Economics: New Perspectives in History and Methodology, Aldershot: Edward Elgar, pp. 89–99

III VARIETIES OF CAPITALISM
9 Eileen Appelbaum and Ronald Schettkat, ‘Institutions and employment performance in different growth regimes’, in Jonathan Michie and Angelo Reati (eds) (1998), Employment, Technology and Economic Needs: Theory, Evidence and Public Policy, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, pp. 91–114

10 Bernard Chavance and Eric Magnin, ‘Emergence of pathdependent mixed economies in Central Europe’, in Ash Amin and Jerzy Hausner (eds) (1997), Beyond Market and Hierarchy: Interactive Governance and Social Complexity, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, pp. 196–232

11 Geoffrey M. Hodgson, ‘Varieties of capitalism and varieties of economic theory’, in Klaus Nielsen and Björn Johnson (eds) (1998), Institutions and Economic Change: New Perspectives on Markets, Firms and Technology, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, pp. 215–42

Index