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Annals of Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy – 2014

Edited by Michael H. Morris, James W. Walter Eminent Scholar Chair, University of Florida, US
A sizable gap exists between the ample demands for (and growing supply of) entrepreneurship education and our understanding of how to best approach the teaching and learning of entrepreneurship. To help close this gap, the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (USASBE) has identified some of the most important and provocative work on entrepreneurship education over the years, and worked with the authors to produce updated perspectives. The intent is to capture the richest insights and best practices in teaching entrepreneurship, building entrepreneurship curricula, and developing educational programs.
In Association with the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship
Extent: 464 pp
Hardback Price: £100.00 Web: £90.00
Publication Date: 2014
ISBN: 978 1 78347 144 7
Availability: In Stock
Paperback Price: £40.00 Web: £32.00
Publication Date: 2015
ISBN: 978 1 78347 146 1
Availability: In Stock
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  • Business and Management
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Management Education
  • Education
  • Management Education
  • Teaching Methods in Business and Management
A sizable gap exists between the growing demand for entrepreneurship education and our understanding of how best to approach the teaching and learning of entrepreneurship. Based on papers, presentations and workshops that have appeared at the annual United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (USASBE) Conference over the past thirty years, this book offers cutting edge perspectives from expert educators and thought leaders on best practices in teaching entrepreneurship, building curricula and developing educational programs.

The book is organized into three sections. The first, a set of research papers exploring a range of important issues in entrepreneurship education, provides a comprehensive outline of the field. This is followed by an overview of award-winning model academic programs in entrepreneurship at five different universities and a collection of real-world examples of teaching innovations, unique approaches to experiential learning and high-impact community engagement initiatives.

This detailed and thorough synthesis of leading perspectives on entrepreneurship education will appeal to faculty and administrators in business schools, universities, technical schools and other institutions that include entrepreneurship courses in their curriculum.
‘This book should appeal to a wide range of interested parties, in the USA, the UK, Continental Europe, Australasia and elsewhere, including: researchers, educators, policy makers and the management team of universities and faculties who intend or currently offer entrepreneurship education. I also believe that undergraduate, postgraduate and doctoral students could also benefit considerably from both the conceptual and contextual aspects of this volume, in order to inform and/or enhance their own thinking, perspectives and experiences of entrepreneurship education.’
– Journal of Small Business & Enterprise Development
Contributors: S. Alpi, P. Bessler, A. Borgese, C.G. Brush, B. Burke, E. Cadotte, L. Canning, D.Y. Choi, R. D’Souza, A.F. DeNoble, W. Deutsch, N. Duval-Couetil, M.L. Fernau, M.G. Goldsby, P.G. Greene, E.Grossman, B. Hancock, K. Hmieleski, K. Joos, G. Kamau, J.B. Kaplan, J. Kraft, N. Krueger, D.F. Kuratko, M. Leaman, C. Matthews, D. McDonagh, T. Means, K. Mehta, J. Messing, R.K. Mitchell, N. Miyasaki, K.F. Molkentin, M.H. Morris, H.N. Neck, T. Nelson, J.A Robinson, M. Schindehutte, J.J. Schmidt, W. Schulze, R. Smilor, G. Solomon, J. Strimaitis, J. Thomas, C.-C. Tseng, I. Welpe, M. Wheadon, R.J. White

Contents:

Preface: Establishing Moorings and Foundations in Entrepreneurial Education
Michael H. Morris

PART I: LEADING EDGE RESEARCH PERSPECTIVES
1. Practice-Based Entrepreneurship Education Using Actionable Theory
Heidi M. Neck, Patricia G. Greene and Candida G. Brush

2. Links Between Learning Speed and Opportunity Recognition
Rebecca J. White and Rodney R. D’Souza

3. From Tablet and Stylus to Tablet and Stylus: An Almost 6,000 Year Revolution in Technology for Teaching and Learning
Elissa Grossman and Tawnya Means

4. Neuroentrepreneurship: What Can Entrepreneurship Learn from Neuroscience?
Norris Krueger and Isabell Welpe

5. The Curricular Confusion between Entrepreneurship Education and Small Business Management: A Qualitative Analysis
George Solomon and Charles Matthews

6. The Road to Excellence in International Entrepreneurship Education: Further Analysis of the Original 2005 Article
Ronald K. Mitchell

7. Entrepreneurial (versus Managerial) Competencies as Drivers of Entrepreneurship Education
Michael H. Morris and Jeffrey B. Kaplan

8. Teaching Social Entrepreneurship
Kristin Joos and Michele Leaman

9. Can Universities Really Help Students Start Ventures?
Nola Miyasaki

10. Design-Centered Entrepreneurship: A Process for Designing Opportunities
Michael G. Goldsby, Donald F. Kuratko and Thomas Nelson

11. The New Paradigm: Creatives and Arts Entrepreneurs
Joyce Thomas, Deana McDonagh and Lisa Canning

12. Teaching Entrepreneurship Students How to Design a Business Model
Michael H. Morris and Minet Schindehutte

13. Enhancing the Employability of Doctoral Students through Entrepreneurship Education
Nathalie Duval-Couetil and Mandy Wheadon

14. The Use of Simulations in Entrepreneurship Education: Opportunities, Challenges and Outcomes
Ernest Cadotte

PART II: MODEL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
15. Indiana University: Thought Leadership and Campus-wide Infusion of Entrepreneurship
Donald F. Kuratko

16. Entrepreneurship at Babson College: Curricular, Co-Curricular and Executive Education Programs
Candida G. Brush, Patricia G. Greene and Janet Strimaitis

17. Graduate Level Entrepreneurship at the University of Florida
Jamie Kraft and Chien-Chi Tseng

18. Honoring the Entrepreneurial Journey: A Strengths-Based Approach to the Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Program at TCU
Brad Hancock, Keith Hmieleski and Ray Smilor

19. Student-Centered Entrepreneurship at San Diego State University
Alex F. DeNoble and Gichuhi Kamau

PART III: INNOVATIONS IN THE CLASSROOM, EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING AND OUTREACH
20. Millikin Arts and Entrepreneurship Program: Creating the ‘Real World’ Right Now
Sharon Alpi

21. Teaching Entrepreneurial Execution with the YourCo Simulation
Waverly Deutsch

22. Penn State Humanitarian Engineering and Social Entrepreneurship Program
Khanjan Mehta

23. Rice Alliance for Technology and Entrepreneurship
Brad Burke and Mary Lynn Fernau

24. Developing Business Courses that Make an Impact: Rutgers Business School’s Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development
Jeffrey A. Robinson

25. Bringing Design Capability into Entrepreneurship: LMU and Otis
David Y. Choi

26. Virtual Enterprise
Anthony Borgese

27. The Foundry
William Schulze

28. Study Abroad: Entrepreneurship Empowerment in South Africa
Michael H.

29. Entrepreneurship Education Consortium: A Regional Approach
Jacqueline J. Schmidt, Kay F. Molkentin, Julie Messing and Phil Bessler

Index