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Asian Security and the Rise of China

International Relations in an Age of Volatility David Martin Jones, Honorary Reader, School of Political Science and International Studies, University of Queensland, Australia and Visiting Professor, War Studies Department, King's College, London, UK, Nicholas Khoo, Senior Lecturer, Department of Politics, University of Otago, New Zealand and M.L.R. Smith, Professor of Strategic Theory, Department of War Studies, King’s College, London, UK
East Asia is without question a region of huge economic, political and security significance. Asian Security and the Rise of China offers a comprehensive overview and assessment of the international politics of the Asia-Pacific since the end of the Cold War, seeking to address the overarching question of how we can most convincingly explain the central dynamics of Asia’s international relations. Via a realist perspective on the dynamics and frictions associated with accommodating the rise of powerful states, this timely book addresses the core issue in contemporary Asian politics: the rise of China.
Extent: 304 pp
Hardback Price: £90.00 Web: £81.00
Publication Date: 2013
ISBN: 978 1 78100 461 6
Availability: In Stock
Paperback Price: £27.50 Web: £22.00
Publication Date: 2014
ISBN: 978 1 78254 488 3
Availability: In Stock
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East Asia is without question a region of huge economic, political and security significance. Asian Security and the Rise of China offers a comprehensive overview and assessment of the international politics of the Asia-Pacific since the end of the Cold War, seeking to address the overarching question of how we can most convincingly explain the central dynamics of Asia’s international relations. Via a realist perspective on the dynamics and frictions associated with accommodating the rise of powerful states, this timely book addresses the core issue in contemporary Asian politics: the rise of China.

The contributors expertly evaluate China’s rise and the impact it has had on the dynamics of regional relations in North East and South East Asia. They demonstrate that China’s economic development and its regional and international ambition increasingly conflict with the existing consensus-based regional arrangements such as the ASEAN Regional Forum and the East Asian Summit mechanism. As a consequence, smaller states in the region increasingly resort to hedging and balancing strategies in an attempt to mitigate Chinese hegemony. This leaves the region in the grip of a complex and potentially destabilizing security dilemma.

The book offers a compelling analysis of the problem that China presents for its region that will enlighten undergraduate students of regional political studies and international relations. Postgraduate and Masters students on courses addressing East and South East Asia will also find plenty of information in this invaluable book.
‘This thoroughly researched and clearly written book considers a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches to understanding the impact and implications of China's rise, with separate chapters considering the very different dynamics of Northeast Asia, Southeast Asia, and Australia. . . In all, they provide valuable information and ample food for thought for students and practitioners at all levels. Highly recommended.’
– M.F. Farrell, Choice

‘This book undertakes a sophisticated analysis of considerable nuance. The careful discussion, which makes use of multiple international relations theoretical positions, does not confuse but rather provides a thoughtful, well-balanced approach, missing in some of the more excitable “rising China” publications. . . the book offers many important insights for policymakers, academics and those deeply concerned with understanding the East Asian region.’
– Peter Layton, RUSI Journal

David Martin Jones, Nicholas Khoo and M. R. Smith have delivered a wonderfull neoclassical take on East Asian security and added energy to the debate surrounding China's rising influence in that region. Asian Security and the Rise of China will find an audience in universities as well as in the conference rooms where foreign and security policies are made in the Asia- Pacific.
– Dylan Kissane, CEU Political Science Journal

‘Khoo, Jones, and Smith have pulled off a remarkable balancing act, crafting a well-grounded and multifaceted survey of China’s rise in the context of Asian security. In a field which is often marked more by scholarly effervescence than substance, the authors provide a refreshingly detailed portrait of the last two decades, and fair-mindedly point out evidence which might support both extremes of the debates they challenge with their own “third way”.’
– Frank ‘Scott’ Douglas, US Naval War College, US

‘Congratulations to the authors for a clearly argued and comprehensive treatment of China’s post-Cold War rise and what it means for existing and future dynamics of the Asia-Pacific region. Effectively employing realist theory in a fair-minded treatment of regional developments, the volume shows how and why power realities are more important than non-material factors in determining the region’s trajectory and thereby demonstrates that China’s ascendance in Asia remains complicated and conflicted.’
– Robert Sutter, George Washington University, US

‘Jones, Khoo, and Smith have written a very good primer to the challenges the rise of China poses for the East Asian regional order and its various constituent parts. They manage to do so while also presenting a clear, well-considered argument on how the respective actors in this drama are likely to respond. That they intersperse their analysis with humorous asides and clever metaphors is not lost on the reader; preventing the book from becoming a dry overview of the alphabet soup of meetings, agreements, frameworks, and institutions that have defined international relations in East and Southeast Asia in the past 30 years or so.’
– East Asian Integration Review
Contents: Introduction 1. Rocky Rise: US–China Relations in the Post-Cold War Era 2. Fear Factor: Northeast Asian Responses to China’s Rise 3. ASEAN’s Elusive Search for a Role in East Asian International Relations 4. Norms are what Strong States Make of Them: ASEAN in an Age of Volatility 5. Producing Security: State Power, Democracy and Southeast Asian Regionalism 6. Between Two Worlds: Australian Foreign Policy, the Rise of China and Middle-Power Responses to New and Old Security Dilemmas 7. The New Twenty Years’ Crisis: East Asia and the Northern Financial Crisis Conclusion Bibliography Index