TOTAL: 123
  1. Richard Cantillon (1680–1734) and Jacques Turgot (1727–1781)

    Richard Cantillon (1680–1734) and Jacques Turgot (1727–1781)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    Richard Cantillon was an Irish refugee who fled to France after the defeat of James II. As a business associate of John Law he sold stock on a rising market and made a fortune from the Mississippi Bubble. His one great book ‘Essay on the Nature of Commerce in General’ circulated widely among French and English economic writers and was widely quoted and even plagiarised by amongst others Hume, Turgot, Mirabeau, Stewart and Adam Smith. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 228.00   Web: $ 205.20
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  2. David Ricardo (1772–1823)

    David Ricardo (1772–1823)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    Ricardo’s intellectual appeal, both amongst his contemporaries and more recently, rested on his remarkable gift for heroic abstractions: he seized hold of a wide range of significant problems with a simple analytical model and yielded, after a few elementary manipulations, dramatic conclusions of a distinctly practical nature. In short, precisely the art Keynes was to use so successfully. Although his reputation ebbed towards the end of the nineteenth century, he was still being acclaimed by economists as diverse as Marx and Marshall. Ironically, since Sraffa’s work revived Ricardo’s reputation, this most bourgeois of economists has been brought back into contemporary debate by economists seeking Marx’s intellectual mentors. This selection of recent articles reflects the renewal of interest in Ricardo’s work. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 197.00   Web: $ 177.30
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  3. Aristotle (384–322 BC)

    Aristotle (384–322 BC)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    Aristotle has rightly been called a ‘universal genius’. Whilst his work in economics was not fundamental, it has nevertheless attracted an enormous literature. This is particularly true of some passages in his ‘Politics’ on the ‘Natural’ and ‘Unnatural’ modes of acquiring wealth and some pages in his ‘Nicomachean Ethics’ on the question of justice in exchange. Aristotle’s views on the practice of usury and the doctrine of ‘just price’ have been heatedly debated from the Middle Ages to the present day. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 207.00   Web: $ 186.30
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  4. Pre-Classical Economists Volume II:

    Pre-Classical Economists Volume II:

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    Pierre le Pesant Boisguilbert was considered by Marx as one of the founders of classical political economy. His writings contain a large number of concepts and ideas that reappear in the writings of Quesnay, Cantillon and Adam Smith. George Berkeley – a major figure in the history of philosophical idealism – was the author of ‘The Querist’, a treatise on the nature of Irish under-development and cures for Irish poverty. Baron de Montesquieu – one of the great 18th century polymaths – is author of the masterpiece ‘The Spirit of the Laws’ (1748) which, while ostensibly a treatise on law, is actually a study of political organization, types of government, national character and the determining ethos of different societies. It enjoyed enormous success in the 18th century and was almost certainly read and studied by Adam Smith. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 176.00   Web: $ 158.40
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  5. Adam Smith (1723–1790)

    Adam Smith (1723–1790)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    Until comparatively recently, Adam Smith was known mainly as the author of a single book, The Wealth of Nations. Modern scholarship and the greater availability of his other work has thrown new light on Adam Smith suggesting that he was no mere economist but a system builder on a grand scale and, furthermore, a thinker thoroughly steeped in eighteenth century traditions. The breadth and complexity of Smith’s thought is reflected in this present volume which surveys the contemporary debate, involving both economists and the wider scholarly community, through some 40 of the outstanding articles published over the last eight years. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 344.00   Web: $ 309.60
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  6. Thomas Robert Malthus (1766–1834)  and John Stuart Mill (1806–1873)

    Thomas Robert Malthus (1766–1834) and John Stuart Mill (1806–1873)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    Thomas Robert Malthus and John Stuart Mill dominated the study of the social sciences in the Nineteenth Century. It was Malthus, not Ricardo or Marx, who was the most famous social scientist of the nineteenth century. This fame rested upon his pamphlet, An Essay on the Principle of Population, whose harsh conclusion caused much contemporary concern. However, the essays published in this volume emphasise the theological, moral and historical orientation of his thought and the more positive attitude towards the masses found within his later writings. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 245.00   Web: $ 220.50
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  7. Thomas Tooke (1774–1858), Mountifort Longfield (1802–1884) and Richard Jones  (1790–1855)

    Thomas Tooke (1774–1858), Mountifort Longfield (1802–1884) and Richard Jones (1790–1855)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    Thomas Tooke was the founder of the contra-quantity theory of money – the view that monetary policy is powerless to influence prices because the supply of money depends on the flow of money expenditure and hence is the result and not the cause of price change. Yet his prominence within economic circles was also derived from his work as a lobbyist for free trade and the principal spokesman of the banking school, arguing against statutory control of the currency. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 237.00   Web: $ 213.30
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  8. James Wilson (1805–1860), Issac Butt (1813–1879), T.E. Cliffe Leslie (1827–1882)

    James Wilson (1805–1860), Issac Butt (1813–1879), T.E. Cliffe Leslie (1827–1882)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    James Wilson was one of the first financial journalists in Britain who made a genuine contribution to economic doctrine by his staunch defence of free trade and the principles of the banking school. Above all, he was the founder of ‘The Economist’, a magazine specifically designed for businessmen. Issac Butt is best known as an early advocate of Irish Home Rule but, as Whatley Professor of Political Economy at Trinity College, Dublin, he was successful in creating something akin to an indigenous Irish brand of Classical Economics. T.E. Cliffe Leslie, Professor at Queen’s College, Belfast, is notable for his rejection of the abstract-deductive methods of the English Classical Economists in favour of an institutional and historical approach. With Bagehot, Ingram and Toynbee, he was part of what amounted to an English historical school. In particular, Leslie’s writings on the land question have been taken seriously by, amongst others, Marshall and Keynes. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 237.00   Web: $ 213.30
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  9. Jean-Baptiste Say (1767–1832)

    Jean-Baptiste Say (1767–1832)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 160.00   Web: $ 144.00
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  10. Pre-Classical Economists Volume I: Charles Davenant (1656–1714) and William Petty (1623–1687)

    Pre-Classical Economists Volume I: Charles Davenant (1656–1714) and William Petty (1623–1687)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    Charles Davenant was one of the leading economic pamphleteers of the 1690s. He frequently developed general principles, some of which sound almost like the early writings of Adam Smith. He was, however, a Mercantilist in the sense that he underlined the advantages of a favourable balance of trade as a source of political power, favoured population growth and decried luxury spending. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 197.00   Web: $ 177.30
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  11. David Hume (1711–1776) and James Steuart (1712–1780)

    David Hume (1711–1776) and James Steuart (1712–1780)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    David Hume is best known for his work on political philosophy. However, he wrote a series of essays on money, population and international trade which must rank among the major economic writings of the 18th century. Certainly they influenced Adam Smith and have a sparkling quality that still makes them worth reading today. His statement of the so-called ‘specie-flow mechanism’ constituted his answer to the mercantilist concern with the maintenance of a chronic surplus in the balance of payments. He also put forward what is now known as the ‘theory of creeping inflation’ and advocated the notion that political freedom flows from economic freedom. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 228.00   Web: $ 205.20
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  12. Henry Thornton (1760–1815), Jeremy Bentham (1748–1832),  James Lauderdale (1759–1839) and Simonde de Sismondi (1773–1842)

    Henry Thornton (1760–1815), Jeremy Bentham (1748–1832), James Lauderdale (1759–1839) and Simonde de Sismondi (1773–1842)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    Henry Thornton’s Inquiry into the Nature and Effects of the Paper Credit of Great Britain (1802) is the repository of much of what is the best and most clear in modern monetary theory. However, it is only in recent years, largely through the efforts of Jacob Viner and Friedrich Hayek, that Thornton's work has been restored to its rightful place within monetary theory. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 228.00   Web: $ 205.20
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  13. Ramsay McCulloch (1789–1864), Nassau Senior (1790–1864) and Robert Torrens (1780–1864)

    Ramsay McCulloch (1789–1864), Nassau Senior (1790–1864) and Robert Torrens (1780–1864)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    Between the death of Ricardo in 1823 and the publication of J.S. Mill’s Principles of Political Economy (1848) there flourished a generation of minor but occasionally highly original English economists. Chief amongst these were Ramsay McCulloch, Nassau Senior and Robert Torrens. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 207.00   Web: $ 186.30
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  14. George Scrope (1797–1876), Thomas Attwood (1783–1856), Edwin Chadwick (1800–1890) and John Cairnes (1823–1875)

    George Scrope (1797–1876), Thomas Attwood (1783–1856), Edwin Chadwick (1800–1890) and John Cairnes (1823–1875)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    George Scrope was a prolific anti-Ricardian Tory economist, Member of Parliament and Fellow of the Royal Society. However, this was a highly eccentric toryism. Scrope opposed the Malthusian theory of population, favoured free trade and agitated for parliamentary reform. Thomas Attwood was the leading monetary crank of his day and was ridiculed for promoting the ideas of a paper standard currency. Although he presented the mammoth Chartist petition to parliament in 1839, even the Chartists would not contemplate his radical and futuristic monetary innovations. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 207.00   Web: $ 186.30
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  15. MAJOR INFLATIONS IN HISTORY

    MAJOR INFLATIONS IN HISTORY

    Edited by Forrest H. Capie
    This title is concerned with periods of very rapid inflation in the period before 1950 and shifts the emphasis from hyperinflation as commonly defined to a wider range of experience. It examines the source and origins of these inflationary episodes, how they started and what measures were used to bring them to an end. The experience of the last twenty years, when the entire world has been on fiat money and inflation has burgeoned, sometimes in excess of 100 per cent per annum, has led economists to reflect on historical examples of this phenomena. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 360.00   Web: $ 324.00
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  16. The Later Mercantilists: Josiah Child (1603–1699) and John Locke (1632–1704)

    The Later Mercantilists: Josiah Child (1603–1699) and John Locke (1632–1704)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    This volume presents critical writings on the work of the later mercantilists. Sir Josiah Child was elected a governor of the East India Company in 1681. His reputation as an economist rests on his book ‘A New Discourse of Trade’ published in 1693. His work stimulated a wide range of discussion of such topics as interest rates, population, wage policy, poor relief and colonization. Despite many liberal elements in his thinking, he was a typical Mercantilist in his preference for administrative solutions to economic problems. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 266.00   Web: $ 239.40
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  17. Francois Quesnay (1694–1774)

    Francois Quesnay (1694–1774)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    Francois Quesnay is best known for the Tableau Economique, the proposition that only agriculture generates a positive 'net product' and that industry is ‘sterile’. He recommended a ‘single tax’ on ground rent and invented the slogan ‘laissez faire, laissez passe’. He was the first to found a school of economists called the ‘physiocrats’ which enjoyed an immense vogue in France for about a decade in the 1750s. The practical programme of the physiocrats was to eliminate the vestiges of medieval tolls and restrictions in the countryside, to rationalize the fiscal system, to amalgamate small-holdings into large-scale agricultural estates, to free the corn trade from all mercantilist restrictions – in short to emulate England. Placed in its historical context these were eminently reasonable views but the attempt to provide these reforms with a watertight theoretical argument produced some forced reasoning and slightly absurd conclusions. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 392.00   Web: $ 352.80
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  18. William Whewell (1794–1866), Dionysius Lardner (1793–1859) and Charles Babbage (1792–1871)

    William Whewell (1794–1866), Dionysius Lardner (1793–1859) and Charles Babbage (1792–1871)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    The importance of Whewell, Lardner and Babbage to the history of economic thought is as dependent upon the retrospective reading of their work as it is upon their contemporary significance. However, their individual reactions to the industrial and technological revolutions of the early nineteenth century are also of particular interest to us. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 207.00   Web: $ 186.30
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  19. James Mill (1773–1836), John Rae (1796–1872), Edward West (1782–1828),Thomas Joplin (1790–1847)

    James Mill (1773–1836), John Rae (1796–1872), Edward West (1782–1828),Thomas Joplin (1790–1847)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    Mill, Rae, West and Joplin were, until recently, relegated to the footnotes of the history of economic thought. In particular, Rae’s New Principles on the Subject of Political Economy was not reprinted until the 1960s and John Mill has been remembered more for his eldest son than for himself. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 245.00   Web: $ 220.50
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  20. Karl Marx (1818–1883)

    Karl Marx (1818–1883)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    Whether or not we reject the Marxist schema there is little doubt that Marx was a great economist. The three volumes of Capital, contain some pieces of remarkable economic analysis from which modern economists can still learn. However difficult he is to read, there are moments when, like Ricardo and Walras, he can revel in the abstract power of economic reasoning. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 258.00   Web: $ 232.20
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