Print page

Business History

Edited by Walter A. Friedman, Director, Business History Initiative and Lecturer of Business Administration, Harvard Business School and Geoffrey Jones, Isidor Straus Professor of Business History, Harvard Business School, US
This important book assembles formative articles that demonstrate how business history emerged as a discipline from the interwar years until the present day. The essays, drawn from authors in the United States, Europe, Asia and Latin America, document the remarkable intellectual achievements of the field, as well as exploring the challenges it faced securing a wider impact on other disciplines. The editors provide a wide-ranging and original introduction. The book will appeal to both social scientists and historians interested to learn how the field of business history was shaped.
Extent: 712 pp
Hardback Price: $387.00 Web: $348.30
Publication Date: 2014
ISBN: 978 1 78195 526 0
Availability: In Stock
$0.00

Buy the E-Book @ paperback price

Join our mailing list

  • Business and Management
  • Strategic Management
  • Economics and Finance
  • Economic History
This important book assembles formative articles that demonstrate how business history emerged as a discipline from the interwar years until the present day. The essays, drawn from authors in the United States, Europe, Asia and Latin America, document the remarkable intellectual achievements of the field, as well as exploring the challenges it faced securing a wider impact on other disciplines. The editors provide a wide-ranging and original introduction. The book will appeal to both social scientists and historians interested to learn how the field of business history was shaped.
‘As the strategy discipline increasingly recognizes the importance of organizational history for strategy – in the form of routines, culture or lock-in – this is a very timely volume. It will remind strategy researchers too of the depth and breadth of business historical writing, going far beyond the usual suspects.’
– Richard Whittington, University of Oxford, UK

‘In the twenty-first century business history has emerged as an important and influential discipline. This insightful book explores the evolution of the discipline, and its relationship to business and management studies, economics, and mainstream history. Edited by two leading authorities, it is an indispensable reference work for all scholars interested in the history of business and the development of modern capitalism.’
– Mark Casson, University of Reading, UK
42 articles, dating from 1934 to 2011
Contributors include: A.D. Chandler, A.H. Cole, D.C. Coleman, P. Fridenson, L. Galambos, N. Lamoreaux, H.M. Larson, K. Lipartito, T.K. McCraw, M. Wilkins
Contents:

Acknowledgements

Introduction Walter A. Friedman and Geoffrey Jones

PART I CREATING A DISCIPLINE
1. N.S.B. Gras (1934), ‘Business History’
2. Henrietta M. Larson (1947), ‘Business History: Retrospect and Prospect’
3. Fritz Redlich (1952), ‘The Role of Theory in the Study of Business History’
4. Alexander Gerschenkron (1953), ‘Social Attitudes, Entrepreneurship, and Economic Development’
5. James H. Soltow (1955), ‘The Business Use of Business History’
6. Herman E. Krooss (1958), ‘Economic History and the New Business History’
7. Arthur M. Johnson (1962), ‘Where Does Business History Go From Here?’
8. Fritz Redlich (1962), ‘Approaches to Business History’
9. Arthur H. Cole (1962), ‘What Is Business History?’
10. Peter L. Payne (1962), ‘The Uses of Business History: A Contribution to the Discussion’

PART II DEBATE AND ALTERNATIVES
11. Alfred D. Chandler, Jr. (1978), ‘Presidential Address, 1978: Business History – A Personal Experience’
12. Alfred Chandler (1976), ‘Institutional Integration: An Approach to Comparative Studies of the History of Large-Scale Business Enterprise’
13. Louis Galambos (1966), ‘Business History and the Theory of the Growth of the Firm’
14. Thomas Cochran (1977), ‘The Sloan Report: American Culture and Business Management’
15. Harold C. Livesay (1989), ‘Entrepreneurial Dominance in Businesses Large and Small, Past and Present’
16. Ralph W. Hidy (1970), ‘Business History: Present Status and Future Needs’
17. Robert D. Cuff (2002), ‘Notes for a Panel on Entrepreneurship in Business History’
18. Donald Coleman (1987), ‘The Uses and Abuses of Business History’
19. Takeshi Yuzawa (2009), ‘Recent Trends of Business History in Japan’
20. María Inés Barbero (2008), ‘Business History in Latin America: A Historiographical Perspective’
21. Mira Wilkins (1988), ‘Presidential Address: Business History as a Discipline’

PART III BUSINESS HISTORY AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES
22. T.A.B. Corley (1993), ‘Firms and Markets: Towards a Theory of Business History’
23. William N. Parker (1993), ‘A “New” Business History? A Commentary on the 1993 Nobel Prize in Economics’
24. Louis Galambos (1994), ‘U.S. Business History and Recent Developments in Historical social Science in the United States’
25. Terry Gourvish (1994), ‘The Empirical Emphasis in Business History: Out of Chaos?’
26. Geoffrey Jones (1994), ‘Business History: Theory and Concepts’
27. JoAnne Yates (1997), ‘Using Giddens’ Structuration Theory to Inform Business History’
28. Naomi R. Lamoreaux (2001), ‘Reframing the Past: Thoughts about Business Leadership and Decision Making under Uncertainty’
29. Richard N. Langlois (2004), ‘Chandler in a Larger Frame: Markets, Transaction Costs, and Organizational Form in History’
30. Thomas K. McCraw (2006), ‘Schumpeter’s Business Cycles as Business History’
31. Neil Fligstein (2008), ‘Chandler and the Sociology of Organizations’
32. Walter A. Friedman and Geoffrey Jones (2011), ‘Business History: Time for Debate’

PART IV BROADENING THE FIELD: BUSINESS HISTORY AS HISTORY
33. Louis Galambos (1992), ‘Presidential Address: What Makes Us Think We Can Put Business Back Into American History?’
34. David B. Sicilia (1995), ‘Cochran’s Legacy: A Cultural Path Not Taken’
35. Kenneth Lipartitio (1995), ‘Culture and the Practice of Business History’
36. Philip Scranton and Roger Horowitz (1997), ‘“The Future of Business History”: An Introduction’
37. Angel Kwolek-Folland (1994), ‘The African American Financial Industries: Issues of Class, Race and Gender in the early 20th Century’
38. Robert E. Weems, Jr. (1997), ‘Out of the Shadows: Business Enterprise and African American Historiography’
39. Kathy Peiss (1998), ‘“Vital Industry” and Women’s Ventures: Conceptualizing Gender in Twentieth Century Business History’
40. Louis Galambos (2003), ‘Identity and the Boundaries of Business History: An Essay on Consensus and Creativity’
41. Patrick Fridenson (2004), ‘Business Failure and the Agenda of Business History’
42. Pamela Walker Laird (2008), ‘Looking Toward the Future: Expanding Connections for Business Historians’