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Collaboration in Public Service Delivery

Promise and Pitfalls Edited by Anka Kekez, Postdoctoral Researcher and Lecturer, Faculty of Political Science, University of Zagreb, Croatia, Michael Howlett, Burnaby Mountain Professor and Canada Research Chair (Tier 1), Department of Political Science, Simon Fraser University, Canada and M Ramesh, Professor and UNESCO Chair of Social Policy Design in Asia, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore
The growing intensity and complexity of public service has spurred policy reform efforts across the globe, many featuring attempts to promote more collaborative government. Collaboration in Public Service Delivery sheds light on these efforts, analysing and reconceptualising the major types of collaboration in public service delivery through a governance lens.
Extent: c 360 pp
Hardback Price: $160.00 Web: $144.00
Publication Date: September 2019
ISBN: 978 1 78897 857 6
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  • Politics and Public Policy
  • Public Administration and Management
  • Public Policy
The growing intensity and complexity of public service has spurred policy reform efforts across the globe, many featuring attempts to promote more collaborative government. Collaboration in Public Service Delivery sheds light on these efforts, analysing and reconceptualising the major types of collaboration in public service delivery through a governance lens.

Featuring careful analysis with a global scope, this book unpacks the concept of collaborative service delivery and its practice, drawing from the fields of public policy, public administration, and management. Chapters by leading authors in these areas address service delivery arrangements including co-production, co-management, consultations, contracting-out, commissioning and certification. With a keen focus on conditions that are critical for the success of such collaborative arrangements, as well as their different pathways and pitfalls, the authors suggest ways to improve the analytical, managerial and political capacities needed for successful collaboration in public service delivery.

This timely and comprehensive book is useful for students at all levels interested in public policy, governance, administration and management, as well as researchers investigating the governance of collaborative service delivery. Policymakers and practitioners working to re-evaluate and improve public service provision, especially, will also benefit from its insightful discussions of the conditions and mechanisms under which collaborative arrangements operate and fail or succeed.
‘This stimulating collection makes a timely effort to unite different approaches to collaborative public service delivery. It will be of interest to anyone looking for an up-to-date overview of the latest development in this area of research.’
– Taco Brandsen, Radboud University, the Netherlands

‘Collaboration between government and non-government organisations to deliver services and implement policies has burgeoned recently, in both print and practice. This book not only provides a timely stock-take of the diverse forms and potential of collaboration, but also offers keen insights into its challenges and their implications for public management.’
– John Alford, University of Melbourne, Australia
Contributors include: C. Ansell, T. Bovaird, B. Cashore, Y.J. Chen, N. Chindarkar, I. Dayal, M. Dayashankar, A. Henjak, M. Howlett, R. Howsam, G.F. Johnson, A. Kekez, L. Lahat, E. Loeffler, A. Migone, M. Mintrom, M. Ramesh, N. Sher-Hadar, M. Thomas, I. Van Meerkerk, J. Vince, W. Voorberg, D. Wichelns
Contents:

Part I Introduction: The Promise of Collaborative Public Service Delivery
1. Collaboration in Public Service Delivery: What, When and How 
Anka Kekez, Michael Howlett and M Ramesh

2. Collaboration: Key Concepts
Chris Ansell

Part II Types of Collaboration for Public Service Delivery: Critical Capacities and Implementation Challenges
3. Consultation as Collaboration?
Genevieve Fuji Johnson and Robert Howsam

4. Contracting Out as a Governance Mechanism: The Case of National Health Insurance in India
Maurya Dayashankar and M Ramesh

5. From Procurement to the Commissioning of Public Services
Andrea Migone

6. Impact of State—Civil Society Co-management Contracts on Water Supply in Rural India: Evidence from a Natural Experiment
Namrata Chindarkar, Yvonne Jie Chen and Dennis Wichelns

7. Co-production with Citizens: Demarcating the Mode of Collaboration by Looking ‘from outside in’
William Voorberg and Ingmar Van Meerkerk

8. Certification: Implementation Challenges in Private-social Partnerships
Joanna Vince

Part III Governance of Collaboration: Pathways and Potential Pitfalls
9. Top-down versus Bottom-up Pathways to Collaboration Between Governments and Citizens: Reflecting on Different Participation Traps
Ingmar van Meerkerk

10. Problems of Bottom-up Collaboration: Evolutionary Pathways and Capacity Challenges of NSMD Governance Institutions
Benjamin Cashore

11. Outcome-based Commissioning: Four Pathways to Achieving Public Value
Tony Bovaird and Elke Loeffler

12. Problems of Captured Collaboration: From Political to Politicized Metagovernance
Anka Kekez and Andrija Henjak

Part IV Conclusion: Bolstering the Governance Capacities for Collaborative Public Service Delivery
13. The Need to Design Collaboration: Improving the Effectiveness of Commissioning with Design Thinking
Michael Mintrom and Madeline Thomas

14. General Theory for Managing Contracts in Public Service Delivery: Towards Collaborative Contractual Frameworks
Isha Dayal

15. Coping with the Implementation Challenge: Decision-making Strategies and their Implications for Collaborative Governance
Lihi Lahat and Neta Sher-Hadar

Index