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Combating Urban Inequalities

Challenges for Managing Cities in the Developing World Edmundo Werna, Urban Development Specialist, Headquarters of the United Nations Volunteers Programme
This book analyses the relationship between urban management and the unequal pattern of provision of urban services in developing countries. It starts from the premise that socio-economic inequalities constitute a significant development problem. The book shows how the existence of inequalities may in distinct ways enhance the inadequate living conditions of the poor – either in psychological and/or material terms.
Extent: 160 pp
Hardback Price: $127.00 Web: $114.30
Publication Date: 2001
ISBN: 978 1 84064 347 3
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  • Development Studies
  • Development Economics
  • Development Studies
  • Economics and Finance
  • Development Economics
  • Geography
  • Cities and Urban Geography
  • Politics and Public Policy
  • Public Policy
  • Urban and Regional Studies
  • Cities
This book analyses the relationship between urban management and the unequal pattern of provision of urban services in developing countries. It starts from the premise that socio-economic inequalities constitute a significant development problem. The book shows how the existence of inequalities may in distinct ways enhance the inadequate living conditions of the poor – either in psychological and/or material terms.

Inequalities in developing countries are more intense in urban areas, and the supply of urban services plays a fundamental role in this context. Edmundo Werna analyses this issue with particular attention to the increasing diversity of supply due to economic liberalization. The analysis reveals the existence of varied types of interaction between the government and suppliers of urban services, with significant implications for addressing inequalities. The book argues that local authorities play a crucial role in managing such diversity, and need considerably more support than the present status-quo allows.

Using evidence from three cities (Nairobi, Chittagong and São Paulo) Combating Urban Inequalities will be of interest to scholars within development, urban, public administration, public health and government studies. The book will also appeal to practitioners and policymakers, as it contains policy analysis and recommendations.
‘. . . this book will provide readers with a useful conceptual framework and an interesting set of case studies that help understand the shifts in governance that can so crucially affect the lives of many urban citizens in the developing world.’
– Julio D. Dávila, Third World Planning Review

‘The book provides a useful review of the evolving ideas of urban management from the 1960s (modernisation and “Fordism”) to the 1990s (process and institution-building).’
– Nick Devas, Urban Studies
Contents: Preface 1. Introduction 2. Urban Management and the Pluralistic Supply of Services 3. Intra-Urban Differentials and the Urban Management Nexus 4. Nairobi 5. Chittagong 6. São Paulo 7. Conclusion References Index