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Community Co-Production

Social Enterprise in Remote and Rural Communities Edited by Jane Farmer, Director, Swinburne Social Innovation Institute, Swinburne University, Australia, Carol Hill, Senior Lecturer, University of Glasgow and Sarah-Anne Muñoz, University of the Highlands and Islands, UK
This book addresses a clutch of contemporary societal challenges including: aging demography and the consequent need for extended care in communities; public service provision in an era of retrenching welfare and global financial crises; service provision to rural communities that are increasingly ‘hollowed out’ through lack of working age people; and, how best to engender the development of community social enterprise organizations capable of providing high quality, accessible services. It is packed with information and evidence garnered from research into the environment for developing community social enterprise and co-producing services; how communities react to being asked to co-produce; what to expect in terms of the social enterprises they can produce; and, how to make them happen.
Extent: 224 pp
Hardback Price: $120.00 Web: $108.00
Publication Date: 2012
ISBN: 978 1 84980 840 8
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  • Business and Management
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Development Studies
  • Development Economics
  • Development Studies
  • Social Entrepreneurship
  • Economics and Finance
  • Development Economics
  • Social Policy and Sociology
  • Comparative Social Policy
  • Social Policy in Emerging Countries
  • Urban and Regional Studies
  • Regional Studies
  • Urban Studies
Governments around the globe are promoting co-production and community social enterprise as policy strategies to address the need for local, 21st century service provision – but can small communities engage spontaneously in social enterprise and what is the true potential for citizens to produce services?

This book addresses a clutch of contemporary societal challenges including: aging demography and the consequent need for extended care in communities; public service provision in an era of retrenching welfare and global financial crises; service provision to rural communities that are increasingly ‘hollowed out’ through lack of working age people; and, how best to engender the development of community social enterprise organizations capable of providing high quality, accessible services. It is packed with information and evidence garnered from research into the environment for developing community social enterprise and co-producing services; how communities react to being asked to co-produce; what to expect in terms of the social enterprises they can produce; and, how to make them happen.

This book is an antidote to the rhetoric of optimistic governments that pronounce co-production as a panacea to the challenges of providing local services and by drawing on the evidence from a ‘real-life’ international study will make policymakers more savvy about their aspirations for co-production, give service professionals practical strategies for working with communities, fill a gap in the academic evidence about community, as opposed to individual, social enterprise and reassure community members that they can deliver services through community social enterprise if the right partnerships and strategies are in place. Community CoProduction will appeal to students and scholars over a broad range of disciplines including development, entrepreneurship, public and social policy, economics and regional studies.
Contributors: S. Bradley, J. Farmer, C. Hill, S.-A. Muñoz, K. Radford, S. Shortall, S. Skerratt, A. Steinerowski, K. Stephen, S. Whitelaw
Contents:

Foreword

Introduction
Jane Farmer, Carol Hill and Sarah-Anne Muñoz

1. The Signs All Point to Community Social Enterprise – Don’t They?
Carol Hill

2. Developing Rural Social Enterprise: The Relevance of Context
Sarah Skerratt

3. Socially Entrepreneurial Skills and Capabilities in a Rural Community Context
Sarah-Anne Muñoz and Artur Steinerowski

4. Organisational Processes and the Policy–Practice Gap
Jane Farmer and Kate Stephen

5. Socially Enterprising Communities: Their Dynamics and Readiness for Service Innovation
Katy Radford and Sally Shortall

6. Sustaining Social Organisations in Rural Areas
Sandy Whitelaw

7. Measuring the Value of Social Organisations as Rural Service Providers
Jane Farmer and Sara Bradley

Conclusion
Carol Hill, Jane Farmer and Sarah-Anne Muñoz

Index