Print page

Comparative Labour Law

Edited by Anne Trebilcock, University of Göttingen (Institut für Arbeitsrecht), Germany and former Legal Adviser of the International Labour Organization
This comprehensive collection offers an array of distinguished papers from within the sphere of comparative labour law, covering the subject’s most compelling and thought-provoking questions. Topics include the uses and limits of comparative labour law, the enforcement of labour rights and the methods of comparative labour law. Prefaced with an original introduction by the editor, this collection promises to be a useful research tool for scholars and practitioners, as well as a fascinating read for those interested in the field.
Extent: 904 pp
Hardback Price: $450.00 Web: $405.00
Publication Date: 2018
ISBN: 978 1 78811 457 8
Availability: In Stock
$0.00

Buy the E-Book @ paperback price

Join our mailing list

  • Law - Academic
  • Comparative Law
  • Labour, Employment Law
This comprehensive collection offers an array of distinguished papers from within the sphere of comparative labour law, covering the subject’s most compelling and thought-provoking questions. Topics include the uses and limits of comparative labour law, the enforcement of labour rights and the methods of comparative labour law. Prefaced with an original introduction by the editor, this collection promises to be a useful research tool for scholars and practitioners, as well as a fascinating read for those interested in the field.
‘An Herculean effort that teases out all the major threads in modern comparative labor law scholarship and weaves them into a comprehensive and comprehensible whole.’
– Matthew Finkin, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, US
32 articles, dating from 1999 to 2017
Contributors include: H. Arthurs, A. Blackett, A. Bronstein, X. Beaudonnet, M. Cornish, G. Davidov, S. Deakin, M.W. Finkin, B. Hepple, A.C. Neal, L. Rodgers
Contents:

Introduction Anne Trebilcock

PART I THE USES AND LIMITS OF COMPARATIVE LABOUR LAW
A. Reflections on the Comparative Exercise
1. Alan C. Neal (2015), ‘Endangered Species or Renaissance Child?’, European Labour Law Journal, 6 (2), June, 152–74

2. Katherine V.W. Stone (2007), ‘A New Labor Law for a New World of Work: The Case for a Comparative-Transnational Approach’, Comparative Labor Law and Policy Journal, 28 (3), 565–81

3. Reinhold Fahlbeck (2003), ‘Comparative Labor Law – Quo Vadis?’, Comparative Labor Law and Policy Journal, 25 (1), 7–19

4. Harry W. Arthurs (2007), ‘Compared to What? The UCLA Comparative Labor Law Project and the Future of Comparative Labor Law’, Comparative Labor Law and Policy Journal, 28 (3), 591–612

B. Transposition and Transplants
5. Julia López (2007), ‘Beyond the National Case: The Role of Transnational Labour Law in Shaping Domestic Regulation’, Comparative Labor Law and Policy Journal, 28 (3), 547–63

6. Xavier Beaudonnet (2006), ’How Domestic Jurisdictions use Universal Sources of International Law’, Labour Education, 2-3 (143-44), 9–19

7. Bob Hepple (1999), ‘Can Collective Labour Law Transplants Work? The South African Example’, 20 (1), Industrial Law Journal [South Africa], January, 1–12

8. Christopher Whelan (1982), ‘On Uses and Misuses of Comparative Labour Law: A Case Study’, The Modern Law Review, 45 (3), May, 285–300

PART II METHODS OF COMPARATIVE LABOUR LAW
9. David E. Pozen (2006), ‘The Regulation of Labour and the Relevance of Legal Origin’, Comparative Labor Law and Policy Journal, 28 (1), 43–55

10. Simon Deakin, Priya Lele and Mathias Siems (2007), ‘The Evolution of Labour Law: Calibrating and Comparing Regulatory Regimes’, International Labour Review, 146 (3–4), September, 133–62

11. Alain Supiot (1999), ‘The Transformation of Work and the Future of Labour Law in Europe: A Multidisciplinary Perspective’, International Labour Review, 138 (1), March, 31–46

12. Philippe Auvergnon (2015), ‘Regionalisation of Labour Law in Africa: The OHADA Project’, E-Journal of International and Comparative Labour Studies, 4 (2), May-June, 1–29

13. Dagmar Schiek (2017), ‘Comparing Labour Laws in the EU Internal Market: A Social Actors Perspective’, International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations, 33 (1), February, 171–94

14. Silvia Spattini (2012), ’Agency Work: A Comparative Analysis’, E-Journal of International and Comparative Labour Studies, 1 (3–4), December, 169–210

PART III AXES OF COMPARISON: TERRITORIES AND TOPICS
A. Selected Territories
15. Sean Cooney, Petra Mahy, Richard Mitchell and Peter Gahan (2014), ‘The Evolution of Labor Law in Three Asian Nations: An Introductory Comparative Study’, Comparative Labor Law and Policy Journal, 36 (1), 23–68

16. Colin Fenwick and Evance Kalula (2005), ‘Law and Labour Market Regulation in East Asia and Southern Africa: Comparative Perspectives’, International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations, 21 (2), 193–226

17. Judy Fudge (2015), ‘Constitutionalizing Labour Rights in Canada and Europe: Freedom of Association, Collective Bargaining, and Strikes’, Current Legal Problems, 68 (1), January, 267–305

18. Arturo Bronstein (2010), ‘Labour Law in Latin America: Some Recent (and not so recent) Trends’, International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations, 26 (1), 17–41

19. Annamaria Donini, Michele Forlivesi, Anna Rota and Patrizia Tullini (2017),’ Towards Collective Protections for Crowdworkers: Italy, Spain and France in the EU Context’, Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, 23 (2), May, 207–23

B. Selected Topics of Comparison
20. Marie-Laure Morin (2005), ‘Labour Law and New Forms of Corporate Organization’, International Labour Review, 144 (1), September, 5–30

21. Lisa Rodgers (2012), ‘Vulnerable Workers, Precarious Work and Justifications for Labour Law: A Comparative Study’, E–Journal of International and Comparative Labour Studies, 1 (3–4), November, 87–113

22. Shae McCrystal (2014), ‘Collective Bargaining Beyond the Boundaries of Employment: A Comparative Analysis’, Melbourne University Law Review, 37 (3), 662–98

23. Mary Cornish (2007), ‘Closing the Global Gender Pay Gap: Securing Justice for Women’s Work’, Comparative Labor Law and Policy Journal, 28 (2), 219–49

24. Elaine Dewhurst (2013), ’Models of Protection of the Right of Irregular Immigrants to Back Pay: The Impact of the Interconnection Between Immigration Law and Labour Law’, Comparative Labor Law and Policy Journal, 35 (2), 217–46

25. Julie C. Suk (2011), ‘Preventive Health at Work: A Comparative Approach’, American Journal of Comparative Law, 59 (4), October, 1089–134

26. Guy Davidov and Edo Eshet (2015), ‘Intermediate Approaches to Unfair Dismissal Protection’, Industrial Law Journal, 44 (2), May, 167–93

27. Matthew W. Finkin (2008), ’Privatization of Wrongful Dismissal Protection in Comparative Perspective’, Industrial Law Journal, 37 (2), June, 149–68

PART IV SEEKING ENFORCEMENT OF RIGHTS AT WORK
28. Wenjia Zhuang and Kinglun Ngok (2014), ’Labour Inspection in Contemporary China: Like the Anglo-Saxon Model, but Different’, International Labour Review, 153 (4), December, 561–85

29. Fernando Teixeira da Silva (2010), ’The Brazilian and Italian Labour Courts: Comparative Notes’, International Review of Social History, 55 (3), 381–412

30. Lara Blecher (2017), ’Codes of Conduct: The Trojan Horse of International Human Rights Law?’, Comparative Labor Law and Policy Journal, 38 (3), 437–76

31. Adelle Blackett (2015), ‘Social Regionalism in Better Work Haiti’, International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations, 31 (2), 163–85

32. Lance A. Compa and Jeffrey S. Vogt (2001),’Labor Rights in the Generalized System of Preferences: A 20-Year Review’, Comparative Labor Law and Policy Journal, 22 (2/3), 199–238

Index