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Conflict, Cooperation and Institutions in International Water Management

An Economic Analysis Ines Dombrowsky, Head, Department of Environmental Policy and Management of Natural Resources, Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE) / German Development Institute, Germany
This book asks under which conditions cooperation is in the interest of the riparian countries sharing international waters, and how institutions must be designed to realize potential gains of cooperation.
Extent: 392 pp
Hardback Price: $178.00 Web: $160.20
Publication Date: 2007
ISBN: 978 1 84720 341 0
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  • Business and Management
  • Management and Sustainability
  • Economics and Finance
  • Environmental Economics
  • Evolutionary Economics
  • Institutional Economics
  • Environment
  • Environmental Economics
  • Environmental Management
  • Management Natural Resources
  • Water
This book asks under which conditions cooperation is in the interest of the riparian countries sharing international waters, and how institutions must be designed to realize potential gains of cooperation.

The author, Ines Dombrowsky, develops a conceptual framework that draws upon different economic theories, including the theory of external effects, non-cooperative game theory and transaction costs economics. She distinguishes the different types of externality problems inherent in international water management and specifies the institutional prerequisites for cooperation. She argues that the respective problems differ with respect to the need to define property rights and to establish enforcement mechanisms. The book also explores the role of issue linkage and of international organizations to foster cooperation. The theoretic considerations are compared and contrasted with the findings of a global review of international water treaties and organizations.

By taking hydrological and legal aspects into account, this book provides an interdisciplinary contribution at the interface of hydrology, law and economics. As such, it is addressed to scholars, practitioners and policy-makers, including economists, political scientists, international lawyers, natural scientists, and water resource managers.
‘While I recommend this book as a whole, a couple of its chapters are especially fascinating. I found the review of international law to be comprehensive and well structured, and the chapter on the role of problem structure to be mind opening, especially for demonstration of strategic behavior in the field of international water. This book will benefit those interested in the conflict-cooperation discourse in the field of international water.’
– Ariel Dinar, Land Economics

‘. . . this book offers a good summary of the issues surrounding integrated water resource management as a tool for water resource management across national boundaries an some useful alternative views on the issues. It would provide a useful resource for scholars, practitioners and policy-makers including economists, political scientists, international lawyers, natural scientists, and water resource managers.’
– Adam Loch, Land Use Policy

‘This data collection offers a great opportunity for further research on international water management, and some suggestions in this respect are also made in the final chapter, where the main findings are summarized and policy implications and research opportunities are offered.’
– Marit Brochmann, Journal of Peace Research

Contents: Preface 1. Introduction Part I: Foundations for the Analysis of International Water Management Institutions 2. Economic Conceptualization of International Water Management Problems 3. Legal Perspectives on Institutional Design 4. Empirical Evidence of International Water Management Institutions Part II: Economic Analysis of the Cooperation Problem and Institutions 5. The Role of the Problem Structure for Institutional Design and Cooperation 6. The Role of Issue Linkage for the Resolution of Unidirectional Externality Problems 7. The Role of Organizations for Cooperation 8. Synthesis and Conclusions References Index