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Conventions and Structures in Economic Organization

Markets, Networks and Hierarchies Edited by Olivier Favereau, Professor of Economics, University of Paris, Nanterre, France and Emmanuel Lazega, Professor, Sciences Po, France
This book contributes to the current rapprochement between economics and sociology. It examines the fact that individuals use rules and interdependencies to forward their own interests, while living in social environments where everyone does the same. The authors argue that to construct durable organizations and viable markets, they need to be able to handle both. However, thus far, economists and sociologists have not been able to reconcile the relationship between these two types of constraints on economic activity.
Extent: 384 pp
Hardback Price: $175.00 Web: $157.50
Publication Date: 2003
ISBN: 978 1 84064 510 1
Availability: In Stock
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  • eISBN: 978 1 78195 286 3

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  • Economics and Finance
  • Economic History
  • History of Economic Thought
  • Institutional Economics
  • Methodology of Economics
For individual actors involved in economic activities (i.e. production, exchanges), conventions and structures represent two different types of opportunity or constraint. Conventions refer to values, rules and representations that influence economic behaviour. Structures refer to patterns of resource interdependencies existing among members of any social system.

This book contributes to the current rapprochement between economics and sociology. It examines the fact that individuals use rules and interdependencies to forward their own interests, while living in social environments where everyone does the same. The authors argue that to construct durable organizations and viable markets, they need to be able to handle both. However, thus far, economists and sociologists have not been able to reconcile the relationship between these two types of constraints on economic activity.

Conventions and Structures in Economic Organization seeks to bridge this gap and will appeal to students and scholars in both economics and sociology, offering them new ideas about how they can co-operate in unsuspected ways and combine their interdisciplinary efforts.
‘One of the most exciting developments in recent European economic thought is the emergence of the approach known as "the economics of convention". No better introduction to this school of thought, with its interesting mixture of economics and sociology, could be had than this anthology, which is edited by economist Olivier Favereau and sociologist Emmanuel Lazega.’
– Richard Swedberg, Stockholm University, Sweden
Contributors: D.N. Barron, C. Bessy, O. Biencourt, D. Chabaud, A. Degenne, F. Eymard-Duvernay, O. Favereau, H. Flap, E. Lazega, S. Lindenberg, L. Mounier, S. Saussier, D. Urrutiaguer, H.C. White
Contents:

Introduction
Emmanuel Lazega and Olivier Favereau

1. No Man is an Island: The Research Program of a Social Capital Theory
Henk Flap

2. Conventionalist Approaches to Enterprise
François Eymard-Duvernay

3. Institutional Embeddedness of Economic Exchange: Convergence Between New Institutional Economics and the Economics of Conventions
Christian Bessy

4. Transaction Cost Economics and Governance Structures: Applications, Developments and Perspectives
Didier Chabaud and Stéphane Saussier

5. Organizational Ecology
David N. Barron

6. Interdependent Entrepreneurs and the Social Discipline of their Cooperation: A Research Programme for Structural Economic Sociology in a Society of Organizations
Emmanuel Lazega and Lise Mounier

7. Employer/Employee Relationship Regulation and the Lessons of School/Work Transition in France
Alain Degenne

8. Where Do Markets Come From? From (Quality) Conventions!
Olivier Favereau, Olivier Biencourt and François Eymard-Duvernay

9. Market Profiles: A Tool Suited to Quality Orders? An Empirical Analysis of Road Haulage and the Theatre
Olivier Biencourt and Daniel Urrutiaguer

10. Solidarity, its Microfoundations and Macrodependence. A Framing Approach
Siegwart Lindenberg

Conclusion: Quality is a System Property. Downstream
Harrison C. White

Index