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Corruption, Natural Resources and Development

From Resource Curse to Political Ecology Edited by Aled Williams, U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre, Chr. Michelsen Institute (CMI), Bergen, Norway and Philippe Le Billon, Department of Geography and the Liu Institute for Global Issues, University of British Columbia, Canada
This book provides a fresh and extensive discussion of corruption issues in natural resources sectors. Reflecting on recent debates in corruption research and revisiting resource curse challenges in light of political ecology approaches, this volume provides a series of nuanced and policy-relevant case studies analyzing patterns of corruption around natural resources and options to reach anti-corruption goals. The potential for new variations of the resource curse in the forest and urban land sectors and the effectiveness of anti-corruption policies in resource sectors are considered in depth. Corruption in oil, gas, mining, fisheries, biofuel, wildlife, forestry and urban land are all covered, and potential solutions discussed.
Extent: 192 pp
Hardback Price: £75.00 Web: £67.50
Publication Date: 2017
ISBN: 978 1 78536 119 7
Availability: In Stock
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  • Development Studies
  • Development Studies
  • Economics and Finance
  • Development Economics
  • Geography
  • Environmental Geography
  • Development Geography
  • Political Geography and Geopolitics
  • Law - Academic
  • Corruption and Economic Crime
  • Politics and Public Policy
  • Environmental Politics and Policy
Corruption, Natural Resources and Development provides a fresh and extensive discussion of corruption issues in natural resources sectors. Reflecting on recent debates in corruption research and revisiting resource curse challenges in light of political ecology approaches, this volume provides a series of nuanced and policy-relevant case studies analysing patterns of corruption around natural resources and options to reach anti-corruption goals.

Using corruption case studies across a wide spectrum of natural resource sectors from around the world, the expert contributions explore political ecology as a means of analysing resource curse challenges. The potential for new variations of the resource curse in the forest and urban land sectors and the effectiveness of anti-corruption policies in resource sectors are considered in depth. Corruption in oil, gas, mining, fisheries, biofuel, wildlife, forestry and urban land are all covered, and potential solutions discussed.

This forward-thinking book is essential reading for students and academics in the fields of development studies, political ecology, corruption, development economics and international political economy. The evidence and policy solutions included will be of great appeal to policymakers and practitioners.
‘This is an excellent book which challenges us to rethink the relationship between natural resources and corruption. It offers a wide range of rich and detailed cases – when combined they powerfully demonstrate how a political ecology approach can help us move beyond approaches to corruption which define it simply as “deviance”. The result is a book which is of great value to academics and practitioners alike. If you want to understand how corruption shapes natural resources use and extraction, this is a must-read.’
– Rosaleen Duffy, The University of Sheffield, UK

‘This fascinating and wide-ranging collection shows how politics and power interact to limit the social benefits of natural resource endowments. Stressing the context-dependent nature of rent seeking and corruption, the authors move beyond the simplistic “resource curse” literature to highlight the key role of self-seeking local elites and of aid programs that fail to cope with local political realities.’
– Susan Rose-Ackerman, Yale University, US

‘Williams and Le Billon go from global cases to a unified vision, providing a rich and readable single volume cure for a long-standing intellectual disease. Moving beyond explanations that hold bad governance to be a “curse” of abundance, the thinkers and observers assembled here shed glaring light on widespread illicit cultures, politics, and streams of value that are all a part of natural resource management worldwide. To understand the political ecology of corruption, start here.’
– Paul Robbins, University of Wisconsin-Madison, US
Contributors: I. Amundsen, F. Boamah, C.J. Cavanagh, K.E. Dupuy, L. Epremian, B. Eriksen, O.-H. Fjeldstad, J. Jacquet, J. Johnsøn, P. Le Billon, P. Lujala, G. Mayo-Anda, J.P. Mrema, O. Remy, U.R. Sumaila, T. Søreide, A. Williams, A. Witter, T. Wyatt, D. Zinnbauer

Contents:

Introduction
Aled Williams and Philippe Le Billon

PART I EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRIES
1. Nigeria: Defying the Resource Curse
Inge Amundsen

2. Zero-Tolerance to Corruption? Norway’s Role in Petroleum-Related Corruption Internationally
Birthe Eriksen and Tina Søreide

3. Governance Challenges in Tanzania’s Natural Gas Sector: Unregulated Lobbyism and Uncoordinated Policy
Odd-Helge Fjeldstad and Jesper Johnsøn

4. Transparency and Natural Resource Revenue Management: Empowering the Public With Information?
Päivi Lujala and Levon Epremian

5. Corruption and Elite Capture of Mining Community Development Funds in Ghana and Sierra Leone
Kendra E. Dupuy

6. Misuse of the Malampaya Royalty Fund
Grizelda Mayo-Anda

PART II RENEWABLE RESOURCE SECTORS
7. When Bad Gets Worse: Corruption and Fisheries
Ussif Rashid Sumaila, Jennifer Jacquet and Allison Witter

8. Mapping the State’s Janus Face: Green Economy and the ‘Green Resource Curse’ in Kenya’s Highland Forests
Connor Joseph Cavanagh

9. Strengthening Institutions Against Corruption? Biofuel Deals in Ghana
Festus Boamah and Aled Williams

10. Forest Resources and Local Elite Capture: Revisiting a Community-Based Forest Management ‘Success Case’ in Tanzania
Joseph Perfect Mrema

11. Rosewood Democracy
Oliver Remy

12. How Corruption Enables Wildlife Trafficking
Tanya Wyatt

13. Urban Land: A New Type of Resource Curse?
Dieter Zinnbauer

Index