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Creative Work Beyond the Creative Industries

Innovation, Employment and Education Edited by Greg Hearn, Centre for Creative Industries and Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Ruth Bridgstock, Australian National Senior Teaching Fellow and Professor of Teaching and Curriculum Innovation in Learning Futures, Griffith University, Ben Goldsmith, School of Politics and International Relations, Australian National University and Jess Rodgers, Centre for Creative Industries and Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Australia
Creative workers are employed in sectors outside the creative industries often in greater numbers than within the creative field. This is the first book to explore the phenomena of the embedded creative and creative services through a range of sectors, disciplines, and perspectives.
Extent: 272 pp
Hardback Price: $130.00 Web: $117.00
Publication Date: 2014
ISBN: 978 1 78254 569 9
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  • Business and Management
  • Organisational Innovation
  • Organisation Studies
  • Innovation and Technology
  • Organisational Innovation
Creative workers are employed in sectors outside the creative industries often in greater numbers than within the creative field. This is the first book to explore the phenomena of the embedded creative and creative services through a range of sectors, disciplines, and perspectives.

Despite the emergence of the creative worker, there is very little known about the work life of these ‘creatives’, and why companies seek to employ them. This book asks: how does creative work actually “embed” into a service or product supply chain? What are creative services? Which industries are they working in? This collection explores these questions in relation to innovation, employment and education, using various methods and theoretical approaches, in order to examine the value of the embedded creative and to discover the implications of education and training for creative workers.

This book will be of interest to practitioners, policy makers and industry leaders in the creative industries, in particular digital media, application development, design, journalism, media and communication. It will also appeal to academics and scholars of innovation, cultural studies, business management and labour studies.
‘Policymakers globally are seeing the potential for future growth through embedding greater creativity across their economies. Yet much academic research has focused on the creative industries as traditionally defined, rather than looking at the bigger picture. CCI's research has been the exception, making significant conceptual and empirical breakthroughs in our understanding of creative work in the wider economy. This volume should be required reading for students, researchers and practitioners of innovation policy.’
– Hasan Bakhshi, Director, Creative Economy in Policy & Research, Nesta, UK

‘Hearn and his colleagues have amassed an impressive array of empirical evidence, theoretical insights and policy prescriptions for understanding how creative workers are contributing to a variety of industries outside the purely cultural or creative industry sectors. The scope of their investigations includes healthcare, banking, manufacturing, digital technology, creative services, journalism, media and communication, and higher education. This book significantly advances our understanding of how creative workers are utilizing their capabilities to contribute broadly to the economy. It also offers important insights into professional learning for creative workers and shows how education can prepare future generations of creative study students to succeed in today’s knowledge based economy.’
– Robert DeFillippi, Suffolk University, US
Contributors: D. Bennett, R. Bridgstock, J. Coffey, S. Cunningham, S. Fitzgerald, A. Freeman, B. Goldsmith, G. Hearn, J. Pagan, P. Petocz, A. Podkalicka, J. Potts, A. Rainnie, J. Rodgers, J.H.P. Rodrigues, T. Shehadeh, D. Swan, O. Zelenko
Contents:

1. Creative Work Beyond the Creative Industries: An introduction
Greg Hearn, Ruth Bridgstock, Ben Goldsmith and Jess Rodgers

PART I: FOUNDATIONAL ISSUES
2. Creative Labour and its Discontents : A reappraisal
Stuart Cunningham

3. Compensating Differentials in Creative Industries and Occupations: Some Evidence from HILDA
Jason Potts and Tarecq Shehadeh

4. Digital Creative Services in Education, Mining and Manufacturing: Pursuing Innovation through Interoperability
Dan Swan and Greg Hearn

5. London’s Creative Workforce
Alan Freeman

PART II: CASE STUDIES OF EMBEDDED CREATIVE EMPLOYMENT
6. Embedded Creatives in Australian Healthcare – An Update
Janet Pagan and Jess Rodgers

7. Embedded Creatives in the Australian Manufacturing Industry
Jess Rodgers

8. Embedded Digital Creatives
Ben Goldsmith

9. Embedded Digital Creative Workers and Creative Services in Banking
Ben Goldsmith

10. Looking Inside the Portfolio to Understand the Work of Creative Workers: A Study of Creatives in Perth
Dawn Bennett, Jane Coffey, Scott Fitzgerald, Peter Petocz and Al Rainnie

PART III: EDUCATION, LEARNING AND CAREERS
11. Learning Processes in Creative Services Teams: Towards a Dynamic Systems Theory
Greg Hearn, José H.P. Rodrigues and Ruth Bridgstock

12. Translating Creative Skills: An Example of Youthworx Media for Marginalized Youth
Aneta Podkalicka

13. Developing Agency in the Creative Career: A Design-Based Framework for Work Integrated Learning
Oksana Zelenko and Ruth Bridgstock

14. Graduate Careers in Journalism, Media and Communications Within and Outside the Sector: Early Career Outcomes, Trajectories and Capabilities
Ruth Bridgstock and Stuart Cunningham

Index