Print page

Developing Countries in the World Trading System

The Uruguay Round and Beyond Edited by Ramesh Adhikari, Senior Capacity Building Specialist, Asian Development Bank Institute, Japan and Prema-chandra Athukorala, Professor of Economics, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University, Australia
The book examines the achievements of the Uruguay Round of trade negotiations in reforming the world trading system and the challenges to future reforms. It begins with an overview of the genesis of the world trading system and moves on to examine the key issues as they relate to developing countries. These include further liberalization of agricultural trade; abolition of the Multifibre Arrangement; environmental and labour standards; competition policy; regional integration in South East Asia; and the implications for developing Asian countries of the liberalization of the Chinese economy and its WTO membership. Furthermore, the book discusses the links between trade liberalization and poverty reduction – drawing on the experience of Asian countries – and puts forward arguments on how trade liberalization could effect a greater reduction in poverty.
Extent: 232 pp
Hardback Price: $128.00 Web: $115.20
Publication Date: 2002
ISBN: 978 1 84064 724 2
Availability: In Stock
$0.00

Buy the E-Book @ paperback price

Join our mailing list

  • Business and Management
  • International Business
  • Development Studies
  • Development Economics
  • Development Studies
  • Law and Development
  • Economics and Finance
  • Development Economics
  • International Economics
  • Law - Academic
  • Law and Development
Experience suggests that trade liberalization has contributed substantially to the remarkable growth of industrialised countries. However, for various reasons many developing countries have not yet been able to integrate successfully into global markets and reap the growth-inducing and poverty-reducing benefits of trade. This book argues that while developing countries are heavily represented in the WTO – accounting for about four-fifths of its membership – there is still plenty of scope for the world trading system to work more effectively in their interests.

The book examines the achievements of the Uruguay Round of trade negotiations in reforming the world trading system and the challenges to future reforms. It begins with an overview of the genesis of the world trading system and moves on to examine the key issues as they relate to developing countries. These include further liberalization of agricultural trade; abolition of the Multifibre Arrangement; environmental and labour standards; competition policy; regional integration in South East Asia; and the implications for developing Asian countries of the liberalization of the Chinese economy and its WTO membership. Furthermore, the book discusses the links between trade liberalization and poverty reduction – drawing on the experience of Asian countries – and puts forward arguments on how trade liberalization could effect a greater reduction in poverty.

This is a timely and succinct presentation of the critical issues relating to the world trading system in the context of developing countries in general, and Asia-Pacific countries in particular. It will interest and inform a wide readership including scholars and students of development and international economics, and practitioners and policymakers concerned with international trade issues and global trade relations.
‘An exceptionally timely book, Developing Countries in the World Trading System, provides a critical examination of how the WTO can facilitate real growth in the developing world. . . Developing Countries in the World Trading System is a must read for undergraduate and graduate students, as well as economists and practitioners.’
– Remonda Bensabat Kleinberg, The European Journal of Development Research

‘This book offers thoughtful, well-researched and up-to-date contributions to trade policy research for developing countries. Its main merit lies in the detailed studies and thorough knowledge and understanding of agricultural trade policy.’
– Gabriella Kütting, Progress in Development Studies

‘Developing countries are again, as in the early days of UNCTAD, becoming a major focus in the discussion of world trade reforms. Their sense that the Uruguay Round and the WTO system failed to address their concerns is a major factor behind the current problems in mounting a new multilateral round. This book addresses the key concerns of developing countries and suggests a number of reforms that will enable them to become equal partners in the world trading system.’
– Peter J. Lloyd, University of Melbourne, Australia
Contributors: R. Adhikari, K. Anderson, P.-c. Athukorala, A. Basu, N. Chau, C. Deblitz, U. Grote, J. Menon, T.N. Srinivasan, S. Stegmann, K. Vautier, Y. Yang
Contents:

Foreword

1. Developing countries in the world trading system: an overview
Ramesh Adhikari and Prema-chandra Athukorala

2. Emerging issues in the world trading system
T.N. Srinivasan

3. Developing-country interests in WTO-induced agricultural trade reform
Kym Anderson

4. Asian developing countries and the global trading system for agriculture, textiles and clothing
Prema-chandra Athukorala

5. Environmental standards and trade in agricultural products: evidence from Brazil, Germany and Indonesia
Ulrike Grote, Claus Deblitz and Susanne Stegmann

6. Labour standards, social labels and the WTO
Arnab K. Basu, Nancy H. Chau and Ulrike Grote

7. Competition policy, the Pacific Economic Cooperation Council and the WTO
Kerrin M. Vautier

8. Export competition in Asia and the role of China
Yongzheng Yang

9. The enlargement of ASEAN and its impact on regional integration
Jayant Menon

10. Trade policy reforms, growth and poverty reduction
Ramesh Adhikari

Index