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Energy Justice

US and International Perspectives Edited by Raya Salter, Fordham Law School (Adjunct) and Principal Attorney, Imagine Power LLC, Carmen G. Gonzalez, Professor of Law, Seattle University School of Law and Elizabeth Ann Kronk Warner, Professor of Law and Director, Tribal Law and Government Center, University of Kansas, School of Law, US
Energy Justice: US and International Perspectives is a pioneering analysis of energy law and policy through the framework of energy justice. While climate change has triggered unprecedented investment in renewable energy, the concept of energy justice and its practical application to energy law and policy remain under-theorized. This volume breaks new ground by examining a range of energy justice regulatory challenges from the perspective of international law, US law, and foreign domestic law. The book illuminates the theory of energy justice while emphasizing practical solutions that hasten the transition from fossil fuels and address the inequities that plague energy systems.
Extent: 304 pp
Hardback Price: $145.00 Web: $130.50
Publication Date: 2018
ISBN: 978 1 78643 175 2
Availability: Not yet published (pre-order)
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Energy Justice: US and International Perspectives is a pioneering analysis of energy law and policy through the framework of energy justice. While climate change has triggered unprecedented investment in renewable energy, the concept of energy justice and its practical application to energy law and policy remain under-theorized. This volume breaks new ground by examining a range of energy justice regulatory challenges from the perspective of international law, US law, and foreign domestic law. The book illuminates the theory of energy justice while emphasizing practical solutions that hasten the transition from fossil fuels and address the inequities that plague energy systems.

Among the first edited volumes to focus wholly on the emerging field of energy justice, this book takes a multidisciplinary approach that examines energy law and policy through the lens of environmental justice, climate justice, indigenous rights, human rights, and energy democracy. Contributions from prominent scholars and practitioners demonstrate how energy justice frameworks can be applied in theory and practice.

With a foreword by Dr Robert Bullard, Energy Justice is a critical resource for: law students and professors; researchers, students and faculty of graduate and undergraduate courses in the area of energy and the environment; and advocates and policymakers in the area of energy and the environment.

‘Racially and economically marginalized communities have long borne the brunt of energy projects while reaping few of the benefits. Drawing upon a wide range of case studies, including the Dakota Access Pipeline protests in the United States, this book breaks new ground in deepening our understanding of energy justice and in offering practical tools that can be used by scholars, activists, and policymakers to ensure safe, reliable, affordable, clean and sustainable energy for all.’
– Sheila R. Foster, Georgetown University, US

‘Blending conceptual strength and real-world examples from around the globe, this book shows us how the insights of justice-theory can be used to avoid the injustices of the past as we make the transition to a new generation of sustainable energy infrastructure. It’s a pleasure to see theory and practice so well woven together in ways that offer real guidance on next steps.’
– Michael Dworkin, Vermont Law School, US

‘This collection of essays is one of the first to examine clean energy policies through an environmental justice framework. A moral examination of energy systems, it is a surprising and welcome addition to the literature for practitioners, advocates and policymakers as it offers analysis, case studies, and practical applications for thought leaders and action.’
– Peggy M. Shepard, WE ACT For Environmental Justice, US

‘This book can be a guide for regulators as they make decisions about issues such as affordability and access to special programs that may have been deprived of the attention they merit in the past.’
– Ashley Brown, Harvard University, US




Contributors: S.H. Baker, R. Bullard, R. Colton, C.G. Gonzalez, E.A. Kronk Warner, D.S. Olawuyi, O. Outka, R. Salter, C. Sandoval, D.N. Scott, A.A. Smith, E. Stein, J. Wolfley


Contents:

Foreword Robert D. Bullard

1. Energy Justice: Frameworks for Energy Law and Policy
Raya Salter, Carmen G. Gonzalez and Elizabeth Ann Kronk Warner

2. Fairness in the Low-Carbon Shift: Learning from Environmental Justice
Ouma Outka

3. An Environmental Justice Critique of Biofuels
Carmen G. Gonzalez

4. Energy (and Human Rights) for All: Addressing Human Rights Risks in Energy Access Projects
Damilola S. Olawuyi

5. The Equities of Efficiency: Distributing Energy Usage Reduction Dollars
Roger Colton

6. Mni Wiconi, Tribal Sovereignty, and Treaty Rights: Lessons from Dakota Access Pipeline
Jeanette Wolfley

7. Energy Access is Energy Justice: The Yurok Tribe’s Trailblazing Work to Close the Native American Reservation Electricity Gap
Catherine J.K. Sandoval

8. Transforming Relations in the Green Energy Economy: Control of Lands and Livelihoods
Dayna Nadine Scott and Adrian A. Smith

9. Emerging Challenges in the Global Energy Transition: A View from the Frontlines
Shalanda H. Baker

10. Energy Democracy: Power to the People? An Introduction
Eleanor Stein

Index