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Ethics, Environmental Justice and Climate Change

Edited by Paul G. Harris, Chair Professor of Global and Environmental Studies, The Education University of Hong Kong
Climate change cannot be fully understood or effectively mitigated without considering its ethical aspects. This volume brings together recent journal articles, written by eminent experts in the field, to illuminate the ethics of climate change and the related questions of justice. The editor has selected works that explore the themes of environmental philosophy, duties and responsibilities, intergenerational justice, international equity, cosmopolitanism, human rights, individual obligations and climate policy.

With an original introduction by the editor, this volume is an essential resource for scholars, students, activists and policymakers.
Extent: 968 pp
Hardback Price: $504.00 Web: $453.60
Publication Date: 2016
ISBN: 978 1 78347 713 5
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  • Climate Change
Climate change cannot be fully understood or effectively mitigated without considering its ethical aspects. This volume brings together recent journal articles, written by eminent experts in the field, to illuminate the ethics of climate change and the related questions of justice. The editor has selected works that explore the themes of environmental philosophy, duties and responsibilities, intergenerational justice, international equity, cosmopolitanism, human rights, individual obligations and climate policy.

With an original introduction by the editor, this volume is an essential resource for scholars, students, activists and policymakers.

‘. . . this book is a ‘one-stop-shop’ to save practitioners time and to provide new-comers a foundation.’
– Science and Public Policy

‘This collection displays the range of ethical issues raised by climate change, and the richness of the philosophical discussion that these issues have stimulated.’
– Peter Singer, Princeton University, US

‘This timely volume . . . places the normative dimensions of climate change at the centre of its analysis. It collects together in one volume contributions by the most significant scholars working in the area [and] will be an indispensable reference text for those – scholars, students and policymakers alike – looking for a “one-stop shop” source of the most authoritative articles on this most-significant issue.’
– John Barry, Queen’s University Belfast, UK

‘We have entered the first century in 45 million centuries of life on Earth in which one species can jeopardize the planet’s future . . . The puzzling result is the most complex moral storm ever to confront humans. In this excellent anthology the best minds we have . . . analyze the most promising and just routes to saving this wonderland Earth.’
– Holmes Rolston III, Colorado State University, US

‘I found this collection to be extremely useful in establishing the main ethical debates in this field and as an introduction to the main thinkers in the area. I highly recommend it to students and researchers working on the many social aspects of climate change mitigation and adaptation; living in the Anthropocene; and what we as humans ought to be doing about it.’
– Australasian Journal of Environmental Management
41 articles, dating from 1992 to 2014
Contributors include: R. Attfield, D. Bell, S. Caney, S. Gardiner, D. Jamieson, J. Paavola, E.A. Page, D. Schlosberg, H. Shue, S. Vanderheiden
Contents:

Acknowledgements

Introduction
Paul G. Harris

PART I ETHICS, THE ENVIRONMENT AND CLIMATE CHANGE
1. John Barkdull and Paul G. Harris (1998), ‘The Land Ethic: A New Philosophy for International Relations’, Ethics and International Affairs, 12, December, 159–77

2. Sverker C. Jagers and Göran Duus-Otterström (2008), ‘Dual Climate Change Responsibility: On Moral Divergences between Mitigation and Adaptation’, Environmental Politics, 17 (4), 576–91

3. Jonathan Aldred (2009), ‘Ethics and Climate Change Cost-Benefit Analysis: Stern and After’, New Political Economy, 14 (4), December, 469-88

4. Sujatha Byravan and Sudhir Chella Rajan (2010), ‘The Ethical Implications of Sea-Level Rise Due to Climate Change’, Ethics and International Affairs, 24 (3), Fall, 239–60

5. Paul G. Harris (2010) ‘Misplaced Ethics of Climate Change: Political vs. Environmental Geography’, Ethics, Place and Environment: A Journal of Philosophy and Geography, 13 (2), June, 215¬22

6. Dale Jamieson (2010), ‘Climate Change, Responsibility and Justice’, Science and Engineering Ethics, 16 (3), September, 431–45

PART II SYNOPSES OF CLIMATE JUSTICE
7. Stephen M. Gardiner (2004), ‘Ethics and Global Climate Change’, Ethics, 14 (3), April, 555–600

8. Ludvig Beckman and Edward A. Page (2008), ‘Perspectives on Justice, Democracy and Global Climate Change’, Environmental Politics, 17 (4), August, 527–35

9. Simon Caney (2009), ‘Justice and the Distribution of Greenhouse Gas Emissions’, Journal of Global Ethics, 5 (2), August, 125–46

10. Mathias Frisch (2012), ‘Climate Change Justice’, Philosophy and Public Affairs, 40 (3), Summer, 225–53

11. Simon Caney (2014), ‘Two Kinds of Climate Justice: Avoiding Harm and Sharing Burdens’, Journal of Political Philosophy, 22 (2), June, 125–49

PART III INTERGENERATIONAL JUSTICE
12. Lawrence E. Johnson (2003), ‘Future Generations and Contemporary Ethics’, Environmental Values, 12 (4), November, 471-87

13. Stephen M. Gardiner (2006), ‘A Perfect Moral Storm: Climate Change, Intergenerational Ethics and the Problem of Moral Corruption’, Environmental Values, 15 (3), August, 397¬413

14. Robin Attfield (2009), ‘Mediated Responsibilities: Global Warming and the Scope of Ethics,’ Journal of Social Philosophy, 40 (2), Summer, 225–36
PART IV EQUITY AND JUSTICE AMONG STATES
15. Henry Shue (1993), ‘Subsistence Emissions and Luxury Emissions’, Law and Policy, 15 (1), January, 39–59

16. Paul G. Harris (1999), ‘Common but Differentiated Responsibility: The Kyoto Protocol and United States Policy’, New York University Environmental Law Journal, 7 (1), 27–48

17. Henry Shue (1999), ‘Global Environment and International Inequality’, International Affairs, 75 (3), July, 531–45

18. Steve Vanderheiden (2004), ‘Knowledge, Uncertainty and Responsibility: Responding to Climate Change’, Public Affairs Quarterly, 18 (2), April, 141–58

19. Jouni Paavola (2005), ‘Seeking Justice: International Environmental Governance and Climate Change’, Globalizations, 2 (3), 309–322

20. Eric A. Posner and Cass R. Sunstein (2008), ‘Climate Change Justice’, Georgetown Law Journal, 96 (5), June, 156–612

PART V COSMOPOLITANISM
21. Simon Caney (2005), ‘Cosmopolitan Justice, Responsibility, and Global Climate Change’, Leiden Journal of International Law, 18 (4), December, 747–75

22. Axel Gosseries (2005), ‘Cosmopolitan Luck Egalitarianism and the Greenhouse Effect’, Canadian Journal of Philosophy, 35, (Supplement 1), 279–309

23. Paul G. Harris (2008), ‘Climate Change and the Impotence of International Environmental Law: Seeking a Cosmopolitan Cure’, Penn State Environmental Law Review, 16 (2), Winter, 323–68

24. Aaron Maltais (2008), ‘Global Warming and the Cosmopolitan Political Conception of Justice’, Environmental Politics, 17 (4), August, 592–609

25. Paul G. Harris and Jonathan Symons (2010), ‘Justice in Adaptation to Climate Change: Cosmopolitan Implications for International Institutions’, Environmental Politics, 19 (4), July, 617–36

PART VI HUMAN RIGHTS
26. Tim Hayward (2007), ‘Human Rights versus Emissions Rights: Climate Justice and the Equitable Distribution of Ecological Space’, Ethics and International Affairs, 21 (4), Winter, 431–50

27. Derek Bell (2011), ‘Does Anthropogenic Climate Change Violate Human Rights?’, Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy, 14 (2), 99–124

28. Avner de Shalit (2011), ‘Climate Change Refugees, Compensation and Rectification’, The Monist, 94 (3), July, 310–28

PART VII DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF INDIVIDUALS
29. Christopher Brown (2010), ‘A Litigious Proposal: A Citizen’s Duty to Challenge Climate Change, Lessons from Recent Federal Standing Analysis, and Possible State-Level Remedies Private Citizens Can Pursue’, Journal of Environmental Law and Litigation, 25 (2), Fall, 385–457

30. Marion Hourdequin (2010), ‘Climate, Collective Action and Individual Ethical Obligations’, Environmental Values, 19 (4), November, 443–64

31. Avram Hiller (2011), ‘Climate Change and Individual Responsibility’, The Monist, 94 (3), July, 349–68

32. Catriona McKinnon (2011), ‘Climate Change Justice: Getting Motivated in the Last Chance Saloon’, Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy, 14 (2), 195¬213

33. Steve Vanderheiden (2011), ‘Globalizing Responsibility for Climate Change’, Ethics and International Affairs, 25 (1), Spring, 65–84

PART VIII ETHICS, JUSTICE AND CLIMATE POLICY
34. Dale Jamieson (1992), ‘Ethics, Public Policy and Global Warming’, Science, Technology and Human Values, 12 (2), Spring, 139¬53

35. Dale Jamieson (1996), ‘Ethics and Intentional Climate Change’, Climatic Change, 33 (3), July, 323¬36

36. Jouni Paavola and W. Neil Adger (2006), ‘Fair Adaptation to Climate Change’, Ecological Economics, 56 (4), April, 594–609

37. Madeleine Heyward (2007), ‘Equity and International Climate Change Negotiations: A Matter of Perspective’, Climate Policy, 7 (6), 518–34

38. Edward A. Page (2008),’Distributing the Burdens of Climate Change’, Environmental Politics, 17 (4), August, 556–75

39. Henry Shue (2011), ‘Face Reality? After You! A Call for Leadership on Climate Change’, Ethics and International Affairs, 25 (1), Spring, 17–26

40. David Schlosberg (2012), ‘Climate Justice and Capabilities: A Framework for Adaptation Policy’, Ethics and International Affairs, 26 (4), Winter, 445–61

41. Dale Jamieson (2013), ‘Climate Change, Consequentialism, and the Road Ahead’, Chicago Journal of International Law, 13 (2), 439–68

Index