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From Innovation to Entrepreneurship

Connectivity-based Regional Development Yasuyuki Motoyama, Ohio State University, US
Innovation and entrepreneurship are often considered two sides of the same coin. But are the links between innovation and entrepreneurship as inextricable as we think?

From Innovation to Entrepreneurship questions this seemingly interdependent relationship, highlighting the different requirements of innovation and entrepreneurship. This book disentangles theories of innovation and entrepreneurship, empirically revealing the overlaps and differences between them. Demonstrating that the pursuit of entrepreneurship is the key to economic development, Yasuyuki Motoyama explores the concept that people are at the heart of entrepreneurship ecosystems.
Extent: c 192 pp
Hardback Price: $110.00 Web: $99.00
Publication Date: July 2019
ISBN: 978 1 78990 197 9
Availability: Not yet published (pre-order)
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  • eISBN: 978 1 78990 198 6

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  • Business and Management
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Economics and Finance
  • Economic Geography
  • Economics of Entrepreneurship
  • Economics of Innovation
  • Regional Economics
  • Geography
  • Economic Geography
  • Innovation and Technology
  • Innovation Policy
  • Urban and Regional Studies
  • Regional Economics
Innovation and entrepreneurship are often considered two sides of the same coin. But are the links between innovation and entrepreneurship as inextricable as we think?

From Innovation to Entrepreneurship questions this seemingly interdependent relationship, highlighting the different requirements of innovation and entrepreneurship. This book disentangles theories of innovation and entrepreneurship, empirically revealing the overlaps and differences between them. Demonstrating that the pursuit of entrepreneurship is the key to economic development, Yasuyuki Motoyama explores the concept that people are at the heart of entrepreneurship ecosystems.

Motoyama’s provocative and nuanced approach makes this book critical reading for scholars of economic geography, urban planning and business. It will also be of interest to practitioners and policy makers working in government, economic development agencies and non-profit support organizations.
‘Yasuyuki (Yas) Motoyama has done a splendid job distinguishing innovation from entrepreneurship and demonstrating that the former does not lead lock step to the latter. In providing an excellent review of the literature on innovation, he explains how knowledge spillovers are assumed to foster entrepreneurship. He presents an empirical analysis of U.S. metropolitan areas and two case studies of entrepreneurship in Kansas City and in St. Louis. With this quantitative and qualitative evidence, he explain how entrepreneurship works in practice. In doing so, he exposes the limitations of the linear and rationalistic model of innovation-led entrepreneurship, and offers sound guidance about how to improve policies and practices designed to promote entrepreneurship. He concludes with “dos and don’ts” and an argument for “human” instead of technology transfer that could greatly improve entrepreneurship policy. Motoyama’s book should be required reading both for scholars interested in entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial ecosystems, and policy-makers who want to promote entrepreneurship.’
– Emil E. Malizia, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, US

‘This book makes an important contribution to our understanding of entrepreneurship, providing detailed empirical evidence on the drivers of entrepreneurial activity in cities and regions which challenges many widely held views on why there are geographical variations in entrepreneurial activity. By clearly demonstrating the locally embedded nature of the entrepreneurial process Yas Motoyama provides a powerful critique of current policies to stimulate entrepreneurship.’
– Colin Mason, University of Glasgow, UK
Contents: Preface 1. Introduction: Promoting entrepreneurship, but what kind? 2. Why beyond Innovation and why entrepreneurship? 3. What does the nationwide data say? 4. What do entrepreneurs do in the City of Fountains? A case study of Kansas City 5. How did the Gateway City transform its entrepreneurship? A case study of St. Louis 6. What information sources do entrepreneurs follow? Network analysis with Twitter data 7. Conclusion: Beyond innovation to an entrepreneurship model References Index