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Dictionary of Ecological Economics

Terms for the New Millennium

9781788974905 Edward Elgar Publishing
Edited by Brent M. Haddad, Professor of Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz and Barry D. Solomon, Professor Emeritus of Geography and Environmental Policy, Michigan Technological University, US
Publication Date: February 2023 ISBN: 978 1 78897 490 5 Extent: c 608 pp
This comprehensive Dictionary brings together an extensive range of definitive terms in ecological economics. Assembling contributions from distinguished scholars, it provides an intellectual map to this evolving subject ranging from the practical to the philosophical.

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This comprehensive Dictionary brings together an extensive range of definitive terms in ecological economics. Assembling contributions from distinguished scholars, it provides an intellectual map to this evolving subject ranging from the practical to the philosophical.

Following an insightful review of the intellectual and organisational origins of this topic by Joan Martínez-Alier, over 1,200 terms are thoroughly defined with their meanings and uses in ecological economics explained. In addition, most of the terms include recommendations for further reading to provide greater context and understanding, alongside citations to allow for further illustration on how a term is used in the field.

Encompassing a broad overview of the field, this Dictionary will be a useful reference for students at all levels, alongside faculty and researchers. It will also be an informative resource for government and NGO professionals in environmental conservation to better understand the crucial vocabulary that governs their field.
Critical Acclaim
‘The Dictionary of Ecological Economics will prove essential to living in the Anthropocene. The words we use and how we use them effect how we engage with nature and each other. Using more systemic words and giving systemic meaning to old words is essential for the survival of people and other species.’
– Richard B. Norgaard, University of California, Berkeley, US

‘In the age of Google do we really need a dictionary of anything, much less ecological economics? The answer is Yes! If you need consistent, citable definitions from an authoritative source for your next journal article or just to satisfy your curiosity, this is the place to go.’
– Robert Costanza, University College London, UK
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