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Elections and Voters in Post-communist Russia

Hardback

Elections and Voters in Post-communist Russia

9781858987439 Edward Elgar Publishing
Edited by Matthew Wyman, Department of Politics, Keele University, UK, Stephen White, Professor of Politics, University of Glasgow, UK and Sarah Oates, Department of Politics, University of Glasgow, UK
Publication Date: 1998 ISBN: 978 1 85898 743 9 Extent: 304 pp
Throughout the formerly communist world a single party monopoly has been replaced by multi-party politics and competitive elections. Drawing on the most recent work of the leading specialists in modern Russian politics, this path-breaking volume marks a decisive advance in our understanding of the relationships between voters, political parties and the conduct of the government in what is still the world’s largest country.

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Critical Acclaim
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Throughout the formerly communist world a single party monopoly has been replaced by multi-party politics and competitive elections. Drawing on the most recent work of the leading specialists in modern Russian politics, this path-breaking volume marks a decisive advance in our understanding of the relationships between voters, political parties and the conduct of the government in what is still the world’s largest country.

Issues addressed include:

• the effects of the electoral system and of electoral campaigns
• regional dimensions of party support
• parties in the state Duma and the uncertain evolution of a post-communist party system
• the turnout of voters for elections
• leader popularity and party development
• ideological divisions and party-building
• the divisions between the left and right

Written in a clear, accessible style, this book links developments in Russia to general themes in political science, and especially to other post-communist countries. It will be welcomed by scholars and students of the development and transformation of post-communist politics, and by a wider readership in comparative politics.
Critical Acclaim
‘This book offers conclusive evidence that scholars working on post-communist Russia have mastered the techniques and theories of voting behaviour as a strategy for explaining Russian electoral politics. The book also demonstrates that these theories and techniques, if applied with nuance by those familiar with the case, can help us understand contemporary Russia. The authors in this volume include many of the best scholars working on this subject . . . The methods deployed cover the gamut, from regression analysis of socioeconomic and regional variables deployed by Clem and Craumer, to the statistical expression of survey data deployed by almost everyone else. The volume is packed with numbers: 23 figures and 54 tables! It is hard to think of a useful correlation that has not been explored in this volume. This is a splendid book, must reading for anyone interested in post-communist elections or comparative electoral analysis more generally.’
– Michael McFaul, Slavic Review

‘Students of Russian public opinion and electoral behavior will find this book must reading. Particularly suitable for graduate students, researchers, and specialists.’
– T.D. Clark, Choice
Contributors
Contributors: R.S. Clem, T.J. Colton, P.R. Craumer, E. Davidheiser, G. Evans, S. Goodrich Lehmann, V.L. Hesli, J.F. Hough, I. McAllister, A.H. Miller, S. Oates, W.R. Reisinger, L. Sedov, S. White, S. Whitefield, M. Wyman
Contents
Contents: 1. Elections and Voters in the New Russia 2. To Vote or Not to Vote 3. Regional Patterns of Voter Turnout in Russian Elections, 1993–96 4. The Emerging Structure of Partisan Divisions in Russian Politics 5. Leader Popularity and Party Development in Post-Soviet Russia 6. Ideological Divisions and Party-Building Prospects in Post-Soviet Russia 7. Ideology and Russian Mass Politics 8. The Mystery of Opponents of Economic Reform among the Yeltsin Voters 9. Consistency and Change among Russian Voters 10. The CPRF: Towards Social Democracy or National Socialism? Appendices Index
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