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Globalization and Poverty

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Globalization and Poverty

9781845427696 Edward Elgar Publishing
Edited by Paul Collier, Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford, UK and Jan Willem Gunning, Professor of Development Economics, Free University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Publication Date: 2008 ISBN: 978 1 84542 769 6 Extent: 1,664 pp
Globalization provokes both excitement and fear. This comprehensive collection, which brings together some of the most important published work on the subject, addresses a core issue of contention: the implications of globalization for poverty and inequality. While the debate is highly politicized, this insightful set of papers focuses on the contributions made by academic economists.

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Critical Acclaim
Contributors
Contents
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Globalization provokes both excitement and fear. This comprehensive collection, which brings together some of the most important published work on the subject, addresses a core issue of contention: the implications of globalization for poverty and inequality. While the debate is highly politicized, this insightful set of papers focuses on the contributions made by academic economists.

Globalization may be regarded by some as the realization of new opportunities through the removal of barriers to the flows of goods, services, factors and knowledge. However, it may also have adverse consequences: notably for farmers and unskilled workers in rich countries and for workers in protected industries in poor countries. In addition, this important collection investigates the implications of globalization for the power of international corporations and for the sovereignty of poor countries. It also explores topics such as the history of globalization, migration, capital movements and international institutions.
Critical Acclaim
‘I wholeheartedly recommend the collection by Collier and Gunning.’
– Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture

‘These volumes are a useful reference collection for scholars from the economics discipline as well as for students and scholars from other disciplines that want to familiarize themselves with the original contributions to the empirical growth literature.’
– Morten Jerven, Journal of Human Development

‘This large, diverse set of papers on globalisation and poverty is a tribute to the skill and dedication of the editors and to the erudition and diversity of the authors. . . [the book] can serve well as a source of orienting knowledge, particularly for those who teach social welfare policy.’
– Charles Guzzetta, European Journal of Social Work

‘I recommend the volumes highly as a primer on globalization and poverty. . . the volumes are a valuable resource for all researchers interested in studying the subject.’
– Arindam Banik, Global Business Review
Contributors
55 articles, dating from 1993 to 2006
Contributors include: R. Kanbur, P.R. Krugman, B. Milanovic, M. Ravallion, D. Rodrik, F. Rodriguez, T.N. Srinivasan, J.E. Stiglitz, J.G. Williamson, L.A. Winters
Contents
Contents:

Volume I: What Has Happened?

Acknowledgements

Introduction Paul Collier and Jan Willem Gunning

PART I HISTORY OF GLOBALIZATION
1. Robert E. Lucas, Jr. (2003), ‘The Industrial Revolution: Past and Future’
2. Jeffrey G. Williamson (2005), ‘Winners and Losers Over Two Centuries of Globalization’
3. Paul Collier and David Dollar (2002), ‘The New Wave of Globalization and its Economic Effects’

PART II IMPACT ON POVERTY AND INEQUALITY
4. Ravi Kanbur (2001), ‘Economic Policy, Distribution and Poverty: The Nature of Disagreements’

A Global Poverty
5. François Bourguignon and Christian Morrisson (2002), ‘Inequality Among World Citizens: 1820–1992’
6. Martin Ravallion (2004), ‘Competing Concepts of Inequality in the Globalization Debate’
7. Shaohua Chen and Martin Ravallion (2004), ‘How Have the World’s Poorest Fared Since the Early 1980s?’

B International Convergence or Divergence?
8. Lant Pritchett (1997), ‘Divergence, Big Time’
9. Branko Milanovic (2002), ‘True World Income Distribution, 1988 and 1993: First Calculations Based on Household Surveys Alone’

C Regional Convergence or Divergence?
10. Dan Ben-David (1993), ‘Equalizing Exchange: Trade Liberalization and Income Convergence’
11. Anthony J. Venables (2003), ‘Winners and Losers from Regional Integration Agreements’

D Domestic Inequality and Poverty
12. David Dollar and Aart Kraay (2002), ‘Growth is Good for the Poor’
13. Martin Ravallion (2001), ‘Growth, Inequality and Poverty: Looking Beyond the Averages’
14. Howard L.M. Nye and Sanjay G. Reddy (2002), ‘Dollar and Kraay on Trade, Growth and Poverty: A Critique’
15. Edward Anderson (2005), ‘Openness and Equality in Developing Countries: A Review of Theory and Recent Evidence’

E Country Perspectives
16. Ravi Kanbur and Xiaobo Zhang (2005), ’Fifty Years of Regional Inequality in China: A Journey Through Central Planning, Reform, and Openness’
17. Arvind Panagariya (2004), ‘India’s Trade Reform’
18. Norman Loayza, Pablo Fajnzylber and César Caldéron (2005), ‘Economic Growth in Latin America and the Caribbean: Stylized Facts, Explanations and Forecasts’
19. Paul Collier and Jan Willem Gunning (1999), ‘Why Has Africa Grown Slowly?’

Name Index


Volume II: What Are the Channels of Transmission?

Acknowledgements

An introduction by the editors to all three volumes appears in Volume I

1. Howard Pack (1994), ‘Endogenous Growth Theory: Intellectual Appeal and Empirical Shortcomings’
2. Mancur Olson, Jr. (1996), ‘Big Bills Left on the Sidewalk: Why Some Nations Are Rich, and Others Poor’

PART I TRADE IN GOODS
3. Paul Krugman and Anthony J. Venables (1995), ‘Globalization and the Inequality of Nations’
4. Adrian Wood and Kersti Berge (1997), ‘Exporting Manufactures: Human Resources, Natural Resources and Trade Policy’

A Effect in Developing Countries
5. Francisco Rodríguez and Dani Rodrik (2000), ‘Trade Policy and Economic Growth: A Skeptics Guide to the Cross-National Evidence’
6. Andrew Berg and Anne Krueger (2003), ‘Trade, Growth and Poverty – A Selective Survey’
7. L. Alan Winters, Neil McCulloch and Andrew McKay (2004), ‘Trade Liberalization and Poverty: The Evidence So Far’
8. Aart Kraay (1999), ‘Exports and Economic Performance: Evidence from a Panel of Chinese Enterprises’
9. Arne Bigsten, Paul Collier, Stefan Dercon, Marcel Fafchamps, Bernard Gauthier, Jan Willem Gunning, Abena Oduro, Remco Oostendorp, Catherine Pattillo, Måns Söderbom, Francis Teal and Albert Zeufack (2004), ‘Do African Manufacturing Firms Learn from Exporting?’

B Effect in Developed Countries
10. Robert C. Feenstra and Gordon H. Hanson (1999), ‘The Impact of Outsourcing and High-Technology Capital on Wages: Estimates for the United States, 1979–1990’

PART II MIGRATION
11. Jeffrey G. Williamson (2004), The Political Economy of World Mass Migration: Comparing Two Global Centuries
12. L. Alan Winters, Terrie L. Walmsley, Zhen Kun Wang and Roman Grynberg (2003), ‘Liberalising Temporary Movement of Natural Persons: An Agenda for the Development Round’
13. Maurice Schiff (2005), ‘Brain Gain: Claims About Its Size and Impact on Welfare and Growth Are Greatly Exaggerated’

PART III CAPITAL MOVEMENTS
14. Lemma W. Senbet (2001), ‘Global Financial Crisis: Implications for Africa’
15. Barry Eichengreen, Ricardo Hausmann and Ugo Panizza (2003), ‘Currency Mismatches, Debt Intolerance, and Original Sin: Why They Are Not the Same and Why it Matters’
16. Paul Collier, Anke Hoeffler and Catherine Pattillo (2001), ‘Flight Capital as a Portfolio Choice’
17. E. Borensztein, J. De Gregorio and J.-W. Lee (1998), ‘How Does Direct Foreign Investment Affect Economic Growth?’

Name Index


Volume III: Policy Responses

Acknowledgements

An introduction by the editors to all three volumes appears in Volume I

PART I DOMESTIC
1. Dani Rodrik (1998), ‘Why Do More Open Economies Have Bigger Governments?’

PART II STANDARDS
2. T.N. Srinivasan (1996), ‘International Trade and Labor Standards From an Economic Perspective’
3. Kathleen Beegle, Rajeev H. Dehejia and Roberta Gatti (2005), ‘Child Labour, and Agricultural Shocks’
4. Drusilla K. Brown, Alan V. Deardorff and Robert M. Stern (2003), ‘The Effects of Multinational Production on Wages and Working Conditions in Developing Countries’
5. Jagdish Bhagwati and T.N. Srinivasan (1996), ‘Trade and the Environment: Does Environmental Diversity Detract from the Case for Free Trade?’

PART III INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTIONS
A Aid and Debt
6. Paul Collier and David Dollar (2002), ‘Aid Allocation and Poverty Reduction’
7. Catherine Pattillo, Hélène Poirson and Luca Ricci (2004), ‘Through What Channels Does External Debt Affect Growth?’
8. Seema Jayachandran and Michael Kremer (2006), ‘Odious Debt’

B IMF and Structural Adjustment
9. David E. Sahn and Stephen D. Younger (2004), ‘Growth and Poverty Reduction in Sub-Saharan Africa: Macroeconomic Adjustment and Beyond’
10. Paul Collier and Jan Willem Gunning (1999), ‘The IMF’s Role in Structural Adjustment’
11. Joseph E. Stiglitz (1999), ‘Beggar Thy-Self Versus Beggar-Thy-Neighbour Policies: The Dangers of Intellectual Incoherence in Addressing the Global Financial Crisis’
12. Dani Rodrik (1998), ‘Who Needs Capital-Account Convertibility?’

C WTO
13. Paul Collier (2006), ‘Why the WTO is Deadlocked: And What Can Be Done About It’
14. Michael Kremer (2002), ‘Pharmaceuticals and the Developing World’

D Global Public Goods
15. Scott Barrett (2003), ‘Global Disease Eradication’
16. Sir Anthony B. Atkinson (2007), ‘Innovative Sources for Development Finance: Global Public Economics’

Name Index
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