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Handbook on Crime and Technology

9781800886636 Edward Elgar Publishing
Edited by Don Hummer, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice, School of Public Affairs, Criminal Justice Program, Pennsylvania State University Harrisburg and James M. Byrne, Professor Emeritus, School of Criminology and Justice Studies, University of Massachusetts Lowell, US
Publication Date: March 2023 ISBN: 978 1 80088 663 6 Extent: c 480 pp
Examining the consequences of technology-driven lifestyles for both crime commission and victimization, this comprehensive Handbook provides an overview of a broad array of techno-crimes as well as exploring critical issues concerning the criminal justice system’s response to technology-facilitated criminal activity.

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Critical Acclaim
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Examining the consequences of technology-driven lifestyles for both crime commission and victimization, this comprehensive Handbook provides an overview of a broad array of techno-crimes as well as exploring critical issues concerning the criminal justice system’s response to technology-facilitated criminal activity.

The Handbook adopts a unique three-fold typology of technology-enabled crime: techno-crime committed by professional criminals (crime as work), techno-crime committed in traditional workplace settings (crime at work), and techno-crime committed by individuals outside of traditional workplace settings (crime after work). Chapters explore an extensive range of criminal activities facilitated by the digital age, from embezzlement, financial fraud, corporate espionage, phishing, and ransomware to identity theft, hacking, cyber terrorism, and internet sex and hate crimes. Looking to the future, the Handbook considers timely questions posed by our continued reliance on information technology, including whether we are in danger of becoming a global surveillance state and how we might prevent the facilitation of cyber terrorism by social media giants.

This dynamic Handbook will be an invaluable resource for scholars and students interested in criminology, digital sociology, terrorism and security, and surveillance studies. Offering practical insights on the need for a coordinated global techno-crime control strategy, it will serve as a resource for policymakers seeking cutting edge solutions to the growing problem of techno-crime.
Critical Acclaim
‘This pioneering volume must be in the library of any scholar or practitioner concerned with the radical upending of crime and responses to it brought by new information technologies. Never in the history of criminology have changes come so quickly, nor been so poorly understood. The book offers a cornucopia of concepts, data and constructive suggestions to help understand and respond thoughtfully to the challenges.’
– Gary T. Marx, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, US

‘The Handbook's 23 chapters, and engaging introduction, address important underlying issues, such as the impact of technology on changes in our lifestyles, the problem of global surveillance of online activity as a control strategy, and the striking lack of success of current prevention and control efforts thus far. In sum, the Handbook provides an interesting and comprehensive assessment of where technology has brought us, and the need for more thoughtful approaches to techno-crime prevention.’
– Jay Albanese, Virginia Commonwealth University, US
Contributors
Contributors include: Art Bowker, Pauline K. Brennan, George Burrus, James M. Byrne, Eric Chan-Tin, Jaeyong Choi, Kyung-Shick Choi, Yi Ting Chua, Brandon Dulisse, Caterina Fonseca, Katelyn Greer, Ines Guedes, Emily Homer, Max M. Houck, Don Hummer, Thomas Hyslip, Ina Kamenova, Kimberly R. Kras, Jennifer LaPrade, Jin R. Lee, Claire Seungeun Lee, Joshua Long, Arthur Lurigio, Presley McGarry, Rachel L. McNealey, Juan Merizalde, Samuel Moreiri, Ari Perliger, Sean M. Perry, Sabrina S. Rapisarda, Donald Rebovich, Amber Ruf, Neil Shortland, Loretta Stalans, Marlan Mike Toro-Alvarez
Contents
Section 1: Techno-Crime as Work

1. Hook, Line, and Sinker: The Mechanics of Fraud, Max M. Houck, Florida International University
2. Identity Theft and Financial Loss……………………………... Don Hummer, Penn State Harrisburg, and Donald J. Rebovich, Utica College
3. Phishing for Profit …………………… Eric Chan-Tin and Loretta J. Stalans, Loyola University Chicago
4. Advance Fee Scams …. Claire Seungeun Lee, Juan Merizalde, and Katelyn L. Greer, University of Massachusetts Lowell
5. Ransomware……... Thomas S. Hyslip and George W. Burruss, University of South Florida
6. Online Health/Drug and COVID-19 Fraud……. Claire Seungeun Lee, Katelyn L. Greer, and Juan Merizalde University of Massachusetts Lowell
7. Internet Sex Crimes …… Loretta J. Stalans, Loyola University Chicago and Amber Horning, University of Massachusetts Lowell
8. Sale of Private, Confidential, and Personal Data…... Yi Ting Chua, University of Alabama
9. Online auction Fraud….. Claire Seungeun Lee, Katelyn L. Greer, and Juan Merizalde, University of Massachusetts Lowell
10. Internet Piracy…………………………………... Jaeyong Choi, West Chester University, and Jennifer LaPrade, Missouri State University

Section 2: Techno-Crime at Work

11. Money Laundering………. Arthur J. Lurigio, Loyola University Chicago
12. Embezzlement…………………………………Emily M. Homer, Texas A&M-Commerce, and James Byrne, University of Massachusetts Lowell
13. The Illicit Stolen Data Market.…... Rachel L. McNealey, Pennsylvania State University, and Jin R. Lee, Michigan State University

Section 3: Techno-Crime after Work

14. Spreading Viruses and Malicious Codes… Kyung-Shick Choi, Boston University Claire Seungeun Lee, University of Massachusetts Lowell, and Juan Merizalde, University of Massachusetts Lowell
15. Child Pornography, Child Predators, and Sex Tourism……. Joshua S. Long, University of Massachusetts Lowell
16. Online Hate Crimes……......Ina Kamenova and Arie Perliger, University of Massachusetts Lowell
17. Cyberstalking………………Sabrina S. Rapisarda, University of Massachusetts Lowell, and Kimberly R. Kras, San Diego State University
18. Hacking ……….. Marlon Mike Toro-Alvarez, Latin America Liaison Officer of the Center for Cybercrime Investigation and Cybersecurity, Boston University

Section 4: The Global Response to Techno-crime: Public Sector and Private Sector Prevention and Control Strategies

19. Techno-crime Prevention: The Role of the Private Sector and its Partnerships with the Public Sector…………… Jaeyong Choi, West Chester University, and Brandon Dulisse, University of Tampa
20. The Jigsaw Initiative: Theoretical and Practical Considerations for Preventing Harm from Extreme and Extremist Content Online…….... Neil Shortland and Presley McGarry, University of Massachusetts Lowell
21. The Prevention and Control of Online Consumer Fraud….Caterina Fonseca, Samuel Moreira, and Inês Guedes, University of Porto
22. Managing Cyber-risk in Offender Populations…Art Bowker, Consultant
23. The Prosecution, Conviction, and Sentencing of Techno-criminals: The Limits of International Cooperation……. Sean M. Perry and Pauline K. Brennan, University of Massachusetts Lowell

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