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Reforming Healthcare Systems

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Reforming Healthcare Systems

9781848443457 Edward Elgar Publishing
Edited by Theodore Marmor, Professor Emeritus of Public Policy and Political Science, Yale University, US and Claus Wendt, Professor of Sociology of Health and Healthcare Systems, University of Siegen, Germany and External Fellow, Mannheim Center for European Social Research, Germany
Publication Date: 2011 ISBN: 978 1 84844 345 7 Extent: 1,352 pp
Healthcare is one of modern society’s most crucial arenas – costly, important and controversial. This comprehensive two-volume collection brings together more than fifty scholarly articles on both healthcare systems in general and health reform in particular. The editors have carefully selected papers by leading academics which will enhance our understanding of the central feature of social and political life. The articles are distinguished by their clear prose and wide disciplinary range. The volumes are an essential reference resource for students, and practitioners interested in this topical field.

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Critical Acclaim
Contributors
Contents
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Healthcare is one of modern society’s most crucial arenas – costly, important and controversial. This comprehensive two-volume collection brings together more than fifty scholarly articles on both healthcare systems in general and health reform in particular. The editors have carefully selected papers by leading academics which will enhance our understanding of the central feature of social and political life. The articles are distinguished by their clear prose and wide disciplinary range. The volumes are an essential reference resource for students, and practitioners interested in this topical field.
Critical Acclaim
‘Why is healthcare reform a pervasive global phenomenon? Why do policymakers continually reform their healthcare systems? Why do ideas for reform, such as market mechanisms, which often have little basis in evidence, continue to hold appeal? This impressive and wide-ranging two volume collection of published articles has no ready answers but it offers valuable insights to aid understanding and policy learning. The editors are to be congratulated on provoking debate about the purpose, nature and value of health system reform. Policymakers are well-advised to consult this collection before embarking on massive “redisorganisation” which delivers limited results.’
– David J. Hunter, Durham University, UK
Contributors
55 articles, dating from 1975 to 2009
Contributors include: J. de Kervasduoe, R.G. Evans, R. Freeman, R. Gauld, C. Ham, E. Immergut, R. Klein, J. Oberlander, U.E. Reinhardt, C.H. Tuohy
Contents
Contents:

Volume I – Ideas, Interests and Institutions

Acknowledgements

Introduction Theodore Marmor and Claus Wendt.

PART I THEORETICAL APPROACHES
1. David Mechanic (1975), ‘The Comparative Study of Health Care Delivery Systems’
2. T.R. Marmor, M.L. Barer and R.G. Evans (1994), ‘The Determinants of a Population’s Health: What Can Be Done To Improve a Democratic Nation’s Health Status?’
3. Michael J. Graetz and Jerry L. Mashaw (1994), ‘Ethics, Institutional Complexity and Health Care Reform: The Struggle for Normative Balance’
4. Rudolf Klein (1997), ‘Learning from Others: Shall the Last Be the First?’
5. Theodore R. Marmor, Richard Freeman and Kieke Okma (2005), ‘Comparative Perspectives and Policy Learning in the World of Health Care’

PART II METHDOLOGICAL FRAMEWORKS FOR CROSS-NATIONAL COMPARISON
6. OECD (1987), ‘The Health Systems of OECD Countries’
7. Michael Moran (2000), ‘Understanding the Welfare State: The Case of Health Care’
8. Viola Burau and Robert H. Blank (2006), ‘Comparing Health Policy: An Assessment of Typologies of Health Systems’
9. Claus Wendt, Lorraine Frisina and Heinz Rothgang (2009), ‘Healthcare System Types: A Conceptual Framework for Comparison’

PART III HEALTHCARE REFORMS AND THE POWER OF IDEAS
10. Alain C. Enthoven (1993), ‘The History and Principles of Managed Competition’
11. Theodore R. Marmor (2000), ‘The Ideological Context of Medicare’s Politics: The Presumptions of Medicare’s Founders versus the Rise of the Procompetitive Ideas in Medical Care’
12. Susan Giaimo and Philip Manow (1997), ‘Institutions and Ideas into Politics: Health Care Reform in Britain and Germany’
13. Thomas R. Oliver and Pamela Paul-Shaheen (1997), ‘Translating Ideas into Actions: Entrepreneurial Leadership in State Health Care Reforms’
14. Vandna Bhatia and William D. Coleman (2003), ‘Ideas and Discourse: Reform and Resistance in the Canadian and German Health Systems’

PART IV INTERESTS AND ACTORS IN THE HEALTHCARE ARENA
15. Jean De Kervasdoué and Victor G. Rodwin (1984), ‘Health Policy and the Expanding Role of the State: 1945–1980’
16. Rudolf Klein (1979), ‘Ideology, Class and the National Health Service’
17. Ellen M. Immergut (1990), ‘Institutions, Veto Points, and Policy Results: A Comparative Analysis of Health Care’
18. Joseph White (2003), ‘Three Meanings of Capacity; Or, Why the Federal Government Is Most Likely to Lead on Insurance Access Issues’
19. Carolyn Hughes Tuohy (2003), ‘Agency, Contract, and Governance: Shifting Shapes of Accountability in the Health Care Arena’

PART V INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE AND PERSISTENCE
20. David Wilsford (1994), ‘Path Dependency, or Why History Makes It Difficult but Not Impossible to Reform Health Care Systems in a Big Way’
21. Jacob S. Hacker (1998), ‘The Historical Logic of National Health Insurance: Structure and Sequence in the Development of British, Canadian, and U.S. Medical Policy’
22. Sven Steinmo and Jon Watts (1995), ‘It’s the Institutions, Stupid! Why Comprehensive National Health Insurance Always Fails in America’
23. Rudolf Klein (1998), ‘Why Britain Is Reorganizing Its National Health Service – Yet Again’
24. Richard Freeman (1999), ‘Institutions, States and Cultures: Health Policy and Politics in Europe’
25. Susan Giaimo and Philip Manow (1999), ‘Adapting the Welfare State: The Case of Health Care Reform in Britain, Germany, and the United States’

Volume II – Retrenchment, Priority Setting and Solidarity

An introduction to both volumes by the editors appears in Volume I.

PART I LESSONS FOR HEALTH REFORM FROM CROSS-COUNTRY COMPARISON
1. Richard Freeman and Michael Moran (2000), ‘Reforming Health Care in Europe’
2. Richard B. Saltman (1997), ‘The Context for Health Reform in the United Kingdom, Sweden, Germany, and the United States’
3. Claus Wendt, Simone Grimmeisen and Heinz Rothgang (2005), ‘Convergence or Divergence of OECD Health Care Systems?’
4. Robin Gauld, Naoki Ikegami, Michael D. Barr, Tung-Liang Chiang, Derek Gould and Soonman Kwon (2006), ‘Advanced Asia’s Health Systems in Comparison’
5. Núria Homedes and Antonio Ugalde (2005), ‘Why Neoliberal Health Reforms have Failed in Latin America’

PART II HEALTHCARE AND THE MARKET
6. Robert G. Evans (1997), ‘Going for the Gold: The Redistributive Agenda behind Market-Based Health Care Reform’
7. Alan Jacobs (1998), ‘Seeing Difference: Market Health Reform in Europe’
8. Donald W. Light (1997), ‘From Managed Competition to Managed Cooperation: Theory and Lessons from the British Experience’
9. Sarah Thomson and Elias Mossialos (2006), ‘Choice of Public or Private Health Insurance: Learning from the Experience of Germany and the Netherlands’

PART III HEALTH POLICY RETRENCHMENT
10. Brian Abel-Smith (1992), ‘Cost Containment and New Priorities in the European Community’
11. Joseph P. Newhouse (1993), ‘An Iconoclastic View of Health Cost Containment’
12. Jacob S. Hacker (2004), ‘Privatizing Risk without Privatizing the Welfare State: The Hidden Politics of Social Policy Retrenchment in the United States’
13. Theodore R. Marmor, Jonathan Oberlander and Joseph White (2009), ‘The Obama Administration’s Options for Health Care Cost Control: Hope Versus Reality’
14. Naoki Ikegami and John Creighton Campbell (2004), ‘Japan’s Health Care System: Containing Costs and Attempting Reform’
15. Ronald Dworkin (2000), ‘Justice and the High Cost of Health’

PART IV PRIORITY SETTING AND RATIONING
16. A. Weale (1995), ‘The Ethics of Rationing’
17. Lawrence Jacobs, Theodore R. Marmor and Jonathan Oberlander (1999), ‘The Oregon Health Plan and the Political Paradox of Rationing: What Advocates and Critics Have Claimed and What Oregon Did’
18. Chris Ham (1997), ‘Priority Setting in Health Care: Learning From International Experience’

PART V THE PRINCIPLE OF SOLIDARITY
19. David Chinitz, Alex Preker and Jürgen Wasem (1998), ‘Balancing Competition and Solidarity in Health Care Financing’
20. Hans Maarse and Aggie Paulus (2003), ‘Has Solidarity Survived? A Comparative Analysis of the Effect of Social Health Insurance Reform in Four European Countries’
21. Mark Schlesinger (1997), ‘Paradigms Lost: The Persisting Search for Community in U.S. Health Policy’
22. Richard B. Saltman (1997), ‘Equity and Distributive Justice in European Health Care Reform’
23. Eddy van Doorslaer, Xander Koolman and Frank Puffer (2002), ‘Equity in the Use of Physician Visits in OECD Countries: Has Equal Treatment for Equal Need Been Achieved?’

PART VI INTENDED AND UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES OF HEALTHCARE REFORMS
24. David Mechanic (2001), ‘The Managed Care Backlash: Perceptions and Rhetoric in Health Care Policy and the Potential for Healthcare Reform’
25. Jonathan Oberlander (2003), ‘The Politics of Health Reform: Why Do Bad Things Happen To Good Plans?’
26. Gwyn Bevan and Ray Robinson (2005), ‘The Interplay between Economic and Political Logics: Path Dependency in Health Care in England’
27. Robin Gauld (2008), ‘The Unintended Consequences of New Zealand’s Primary Health Care Reforms’
28. Uwe E. Reinhardt (1996), ‘Spending More Through “Cost Control”: Our Obsessive Quest to Gut the Hospital’
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