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GLOBAL BIODIVERSITY FINANCE

The Case for International Payments for Ecosystem Services Edited by Joshua Bishop, WWF-Australia and Chloe Hill, Green Economy Technical Advisor for WWF Mekong region, Phnom Penh, Cambodia
Global Biodiversity Finance sets out the case for scaling up Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) at the international level. The book explores how International Payments for Ecosystem Services (IPES) can help capture the global willingness-to-pay for biodiversity, and how the resulting revenues can be used efficiently to encourage conservation and the sustainable supply of ecosystem services, on which we all depend. This timely volume includes examples of promising initiatives from around the world, supporting an agenda for action to make IPES a reality.
In Association with IUCN and UNEP
Extent: 208 pp
Hardback Price: £70.00 Web: £63.00
Publication Date: 2014
ISBN: 978 1 78254 694 8
Availability: In Stock
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  • Economics and Finance
  • Environmental Economics
  • Environment
  • Ecological Economics
  • Management Natural Resources
  • Valuation
Global Biodiversity Finance sets out the case for scaling up Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) at the international level. The book explores how International Payments for Ecosystem Services (IPES) can help capture the global willingness-to-pay for biodiversity, and how the resulting revenues can be used efficiently to encourage conservation and the sustainable supply of ecosystem services, on which we all depend. This timely volume includes examples of promising initiatives from around the world, supporting an agenda for action to make IPES a reality.

Key questions addressed in this volume include:
· Which ecosystem services are most likely to attract voluntary international payments?
· How can we assess the international demand for particular ecosystem services?
· How can potential importers of intangible ecosystem services ensure they receive value for
money?
· What is needed to become a competitive exporter of ecosystem services?
· What kind of brokering and other services are needed to facilitate agreements between importers
and exporters of ecosystem services?
· What examples exist of international payments for ecosystem services, and what do they tell us
about the potential for scaling up IPES?

Researchers, teachers, policy makers, civil servants and technical staff of NGOs working at the interface between business and nature should find much useful material in this book.

‘For at least two decades, scholars and practitioners have argued that international beneficiaries of ecosystem conservation should help pay for the supply of services from which they benefit. Yet these arguments have remained inchoate and have had little real impact on the ground. Bishop and Hill’s excellent edited volume should help change that. The chapters are chock full of insights and guidance for scaling payments for environmental services to the international level. Everyone interested in the formidable problems of generating sufficient, reliable funding for international ecosystem conservation and spending these funds efficiently should read this book.’
– Paul J. Ferraro, Georgia State University, US

This timely book on “Global Biodiversity Finance” furthers our understanding of how our market-based approaches are needed to both finance and deliver conservation on a global scale.
– Francis Vorhies, Forbes
Contributors: A. Baranzini, N. Bertrand, J. Bishop, B. Borges, P. Covell, S. Engel, A.-K. Faust, L.A. Gallagher, C. Hill, D. Huberman, K. Karousakis, T. Koellner, M. Lehmann, A. Lukasiewicz, D. Miller, B. Norman, J. Olander, W. Proctor, F. Sheng, F. Vorhies, S. Waage, T. Wünscher, R.T. Zuehlke, S. Zwick
Contents:

Foreword

1. Introduction to International Payments for Ecosystem Services
Joshua Bishop, Dustin Miller, Nicolas Bertrand, Fulai Sheng and David Huberman

2. Ecosystems, Economics and Payment for Ecosystem Services
Joshua Bishop and David Huberman

3. The Two Sides of IPES Transactions: Exploring the Motivations for Demand and Supply
Wendy Proctor and Sissel Waage with contributions from Markus Lehmann, Joshua Bishop, Beto Borges, Thomas Koellner and Anna Lukasiewicz

4. Household Demand for International Ecosystem Services: A Swiss Case Study
Andrea Baranzini, Anne-Kathrin Faust and David Huberman

5. Cost-effective Targeting for IPES
Tobias Wünscher and Stefanie Engel with contributions from Katia Karousakis

6. IPES Supply Side Case Study: The Surui Carbon Project in Brazil
Steve Zwick with contributions from Phil Covell, Beto Borges and Jacob Olander

7. Matching International Demand For and Supply of Ecosystem Services
Francis Vorhies, Joshua Bishop and Chloe Hill

8. Matching Supply and Demand in IPES: The Case of the GreenPalm Initiative
Louise A. Gallagher, Bob Norman and Robert T. Zuehlke

9. Conclusions: Towards International Payments for Ecosystem Services
Markus Lehmann

Index