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Governance of Biodiversity Conservation in China and Taiwan

Gerald A. McBeath, Emeritus Professor of Political Science, University of Alaska Fairbanks, US and Tse-Kang Leng, Professor of Political Science, National Chengchi University, Taipei, Taiwan
China and Taiwan have roughly one-eighth of the world’s known species. Their approaches to biodiversity issues thus have global as well as national repercussions. Gerald McBeath and Tse-Kang Leng explore the ongoing conflicts between economic development, typically pursued by businesses and governments, and communities seeking to preserve and protect local human and ecosystem values.
Extent: 256 pp
Hardback Price: $129.00 Web: $116.10
Publication Date: 2006
ISBN: 978 1 84376 810 4
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  • Asian Studies
  • Asian Development
  • Development Studies
  • Asian Development
  • Development Studies
  • Environment
  • Asian Environment
  • Environmental Governance and Regulation
  • Environmental Politics and Policy
  • Environmental Sociology
  • Politics and Public Policy
  • Environmental Politics and Policy
  • European Politics and Policy
China and Taiwan have roughly one-eighth of the world’s known species. Their approaches to biodiversity issues thus have global as well as national repercussions. Gerald McBeath and Tse-Kang Leng explore the ongoing conflicts between economic development, typically pursued by businesses and governments, and communities seeking to preserve and protect local human and ecosystem values.

China and Taiwan have sharply different political and economic systems. In Taiwan, a public relatively more supportive of sustainable development, a free press, a more transparent decision-making process, and an autonomous civil society have influenced governance. Yet democratization has not guaranteed better environmental outcomes. In China, on the other hand, fragmentation of power and ‘softer’ forms of authoritarianism than in the Maoist era have created openings for NGOs, scientists, journalists, and officials seeking a sustainable future to participate in the environmental policy making process. The authors provide an explicit and comparative treatment of the national policies preserving rare, threatened, and endangered species and ecosystems. Considerable attention is paid to the actors involved in policy formation and implementation as well as to recent cases concerning biodiversity conservation in China and Taiwan.

This comprehensive volume will appeal to students and researchers in the areas of political science, environmental science and politics, environmental activists in national and international NGOs, and members of multinational corporations working in developing countries.
‘Written in a readable and concise manner, Governance of Biodiversity Conservation in China and Taiwan makes an interesting contribution to the study of Chinese environmental politics.’
– Kathleen Burton, The China Quarterly

‘McBeath and Leng’s work on contemporary Chinese environmental governance and conservation provides an excellent overview of the key issues in the People’s Republic as well as a timely comparison with environmental issues in Taiwan. . . McBeath and Leng’s book is written in an concise and readable manner appropriate for undergraduate courses, while the breadth and depth of information makes it equally useful for graduate research. This book on China’s environment makes a worthy contribution to contemporary conservation studies and policy issues, and should be essential reading for specialists and students working on biodiversity governance issues in China.’
– Jack Patrick Hayes, Pacific Affairs

‘This fascinating volume highlights the ongoing conflict between economic development and environmental protection in both mainland China and Taiwan. The authors value biological diversity and examine its loss and conservation from historical and comparative perspectives. Despite significant differences in institutional frameworks and environmental NGOs on the two sides of the Taiwan Strait, the authors also note a similar approach to biodiversity conservation and the entailed success or failure. This volume is a must read for people who are concerned with the endangered global ecosystem. Students in public policy comparison may find this volume instructive in combining institutional analysis with behavioral observation.’
– Lin Gang, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, People’s Republic of China
Contents: 1. Introduction 2. Historical Patterns 3. Current Status of Species and Ecosystems in China and Taiwan 4. Legal and Institutional Framework for Biodiversity Conservation 5. Protected Areas and Biodiversity Conservation 6. Business Organizations and Biodiversity Conversation 7. ENGOs, Civil Society and Biodiversity Conservation 8. Politics and Biodiversity Conservation 9. Conclusions Index