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High-growth Women’s Entrepreneurship

Programs, Policies and Practices Edited by Amanda Bullough, Associate Professor of Management and Co-Director and Co-Founder of the Women’s Leadership Initiative, University of Delaware, Diana M. Hechavarría, Associate Professor, Center for Entrepreneurship, Muma College of Business, University of South Florida, Candida G. Brush, Franklin W. Olin Distinguished Chair of Entrepreneurship and Vice Provost of Global Entrepreneurial Leadership, Babson College and Linda F. Edelman, Professor of Management and Chair of the Management Department, Bentley University, US
Women’s entrepreneurship is vital for economic and social development, yet female entrepreneurs worldwide are consistently found to have weaker sales and employment growth, fewer jobs, and lower profitability. This book was written to address this reality, and focuses on the high-growth potential of women entrepreneurs.
In Association with the Diana International Project
Extent: c 224 pp
Hardback Price: $130.00 Web: $117.00
Publication Date: 2019
ISBN: 978 1 78811 870 5
Availability: Not yet published (pre-order)
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  • Business and Management
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Gender and Management
Women’s entrepreneurship is vital for economic and social development, yet female entrepreneurs worldwide are consistently found to have weaker sales and employment growth, fewer jobs, and lower profitability. This book was written to address this reality and focuses on the high-growth potential of women entrepreneurs.

The scholars in this book conducted qualitative as well as quantitative research in contexts around the world, including Eswatini (Swaziland), Australia, China, Slovenia, Peru, and one global study of 43 countries. Chapters are organized according to three key themes: the practice of building networks, programs and the support environment, and policies and regulations. Topics addressed within these themes include the interconnected and mutually reinforcing features of a fruitful entrepreneurial culture, including financial and human capital advancement and readiness, new opportunities for expansion and an assortment of institutional and infrastructural provisions for innovation and business growth.

High-growth Women’s Entrepreneurship will appeal to public and private sector managers, policy makers and politicians who want to promote a culture and ecosystem that supports women’s growth-oriented business potential. Educators and program designers who want to help women grow their businesses, and scholars who want to explore further research will find the information invaluable.
‘Despite the surge of interest in women’s entrepreneurship around the globe, very little attention and support is currently directed towards high-potential women’s entrepreneurship. These talented entrepreneurs face many of the constraints that women micropreneurs and small business owners struggle with, but they are running business that demand even greater access to the resources required for scale, in business circles and industries where women are severely underrepresented. This edited volume provides important research evidence to guide researchers, policymakers, program leaders and investors on how best to spend dollars in support of women starting and growing high potential ventures. A must-read!’
– Amanda B. Elam, Babson College, US

‘This latest book from the Diana Project network frames a long delayed, much needed, and deliberatively provocative discussion about the relationship between growth-oriented women entrepreneurs and public policy and regulatory frameworks, building networks, and the entrepreneurship support environment. The primary question is whether they help or hurt. The editors and contributors represent all the continents (except Antarctica!) to bring a truly global and thoughtful consideration to what we know, and what we still need to learn.’
– Patricia Greene, Professor Emeritus, Babson College, US

‘High-growth Women’s Entrepreneurship represents a valuable addition to the emerging body of research on women’s entrepreneurship public policy. This book provides a global perspective on programs, policies and practices by incorporating chapters representing the experience of growth-oriented women entrepreneurs in both developed and developing economies. Each chapter provides valuable “lessons learned” that can be shared across geographic boundaries. These, in turn, form the basis for policy recommendations designed to foster innovation and growth among women entrepreneurs. This book is a true gem, and merits multiple reads to fully capture the insights offered by its editors and contributors.’
– Susan Coleman, University of Hartford, US

‘This insightful text focuses on facilitating high-growth women's entrepreneurship through the development of appropriate programs, policies and practices. It draws on international scholarly contributions that address challenges in relation to networks, opportunities, finance and the regulatory environment, across different economic contexts. As such, the book should appeal to a broad range of stakeholders engaged in this important agenda – academic researchers, educators, policy makers and practitioners. The authors' comprehensive and reflective set of recommendations geared toward improving women's access to finance and enhancing their growth trajectory are particularly valuable, making this book quite unique.’
– Colette Henry, Dundalk Institute of Technology (DkIT), Ireland

‘This timely volume presents rich insights on the effectiveness of entrepreneurial practices, programs, and public policies in support of high-growth oriented women’s entrepreneurship in institutional and cultural contexts as diverse as Eswatini (Swaziland), Australia, China, Slovenia, or Peru, as well as a global study of 43 countries. Drawing on the collective evidence provided by an impressive array of global experts, the concluding chapter offers a number of actionable recommendations for public and private agencies dedicated to the promotion of women’s entrepreneurial initiatives around the world. This compendium of research is a must-read for practitioners and policy makers alike.’
– Tatiana S. Manolova, Bentley University, US
Contributors: N. Birdthistle, C.J. Boudreaux, Z. Brixiová, C.G. Brush, A. Bullough, D. Cetindamar, M. Córdova, L.F. Edelman, R. Eversole, B. Frešer, V. Godinho, D.M. Hechavarría, F. Huamán, E. James, T. Kangoye, T. Lammers, Y. Li, S. Muhammad, B. Nikolaev, A. Pearce, K. Širec, E. Sullivan, P. Tominc, M. Walo, J. Wu
Contents

1 Introduction: programs, policies and practices: fostering
high-growth women’s entrepreneurship 1
Amanda Bullough, Diana M. Hechavarría, Candida G. Brush and Linda F. Edelman
2 Networks, start-up capital and women’s entrepreneurial performance in Africa: evidence from Eswatini 13
Zuzana Brixiová and Thierry Kangoye
3 Absence of opportunities can enhance women’s
high-growth entrepreneurship: empirical evidence from Peru 32
Miguel Córdova and Fátima Huamán
4 Towards a typology of supports for enterprising women:
a comparison of rural and urban Australian regions 52
Robyn Eversole, Naomi Birdthistle, Megerssa Walo and Vinita Godinho
5 STEM education and women entrepreneurs in technology enterprises: explorations from Australia 78
Dilek Cetindamar, Elayn James, Thorsten Lammers, Alicia Pearce and Elizabeth Sullivan
6 Exploring gender differences in entrepreneurship: how the regulatory environment mitigates differences in
early-stage growth aspirations 109
Christopher J. Boudreaux and Boris Nikolaev
7 Gender gap in perceived financing opportunities for
high-growth enterprises 133
Blaž Frešer, Karin Širec and Polona Tominc
vi High-growth women’s entrepreneurship
8 Women’s awareness of financial policy and their debt
financing activities: evidence from China 160
Juan Wu, Yaokuang Li and Shakeel Muhammad
9 Where do we go from here? Summary of findings 183
Amanda Bullough, Diana M. Hechavarría, Candida G. Brush and Linda F. Edelman

Index 195