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History of Entrepreneurship: Innovation and Risk-taking, 1200–2000

Edited by Mark Casson, Professor of Economics and Director, Centre for Institutions and Economic History, University of Reading and Catherine Casson, Research Fellow, Winton Institute for Monetary History, Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford and Alliance Manchester Business School, University of Manchester, UK
What are the secrets of a successful entrepreneur? When did the origins of enterprise occur? This important two-volume set addresses such questions by uniting historical case studies of entrepreneurial behaviour from 1200–2000. Key features of this collection include a thematic and chronological comparison of relevant studies as well as coverage of a range of industries, including the software industry. The editors have also selected papers which allow for an examination of a range of entrepreneurial backgrounds and personalities, including female entrepreneurs.

This topical set will be of great use to both students and academics who will benefit from the ability to contrast case-studies of large-firms and their executives with small firm-start-ups and their founders.
Two volume set
Extent: 1,584 pp
Hardback Price: $892.00 Web: $802.80
Publication Date: 2013
ISBN: 978 1 78195 523 9
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  • Business and Management
  • Entrepreneurship
  • International Business
  • Economics and Finance
  • Economics of Entrepreneurship
What are the secrets of a successful entrepreneur? When did the origins of enterprise occur? This important two-volume set addresses such questions by uniting historical case studies of entrepreneurial behaviour from 1200–2000. Key features of this collection include a thematic and chronological comparison of relevant studies as well as coverage of a range of industries, including the software industry. The editors have also selected papers which allow for an examination of a range of entrepreneurial backgrounds and personalities, including female entrepreneurs.

This topical set will be of great use to both students and academics who will benefit from the ability to contrast case-studies of large-firms and their executives with small firm-start-ups and their founders.
‘This exciting collection, framed by an authoritative introduction, puts the intellectual excitement back into the study of entrepreneurship. We escape from the self-imposed straightjacket of high-tech start-ups to explore the role of entrepreneurship in multiple geographical settings over the last thousand years, as well as in a wide range of institutional forms. This volume is transformational.’
– Geoffrey Jones, Harvard Business School, US
61 articles, dating from 1938 to 2011
Contributors include: F. Amatori, A. Bell, C. Dyer, A. Godley, D. Jeremy, M. Kirby, M. Rose, K. Ryerson, P. Scranton, J. Stobart
Contents:

Volume I: Themes

Acknowledgements

Introduction Mark Casson and Catherine Casson

PART I LOCATING ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN THE MEDIEVAL AND EARLY MODERN ECONOMY: 1200–1700
1. Christopher Dyer (2005), ‘A New Middle Ages’
2. Adrian R. Bell and Richard S. Dale (2011), ‘The Medieval Pilgrimage Business’
3. R.A. Donkin (1958), ‘Cistercian Sheep-Farming and Wool-Sales in the Thirteenth Century’
4. Thomas W. Blomquist (1971), ‘The Castracani Family of Thirteenth-Century Lucca’
5. Iris Origo (1937 [1960]), ‘Money’
6. Frederic C. Lane (1944 [1967]), ‘Old Wealth and New’
7. S.D. Goitein (1967), ‘The World of Commerce and Finance: Part A: The Merchants and their Employees’
8. Kathryn L. Reyerson (2002), ‘Introduction’
9. Philippe Dollinger (1864 [1970]), ‘The Merchants’
10. Oscar Gelderblom (2003), ‘The Governance of Early Modern Trade: The Case of Hans Thijs, 1556–1611’
11. Wang Gungwu (1990), ‘Merchants Without Empire: The Hokkien Sojourning Communities’

PART II ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN INDUSTRIALISING ECONOMIES: 1700–2000
A. Family Firms and Business Elites
12. Andrea Colli, Paloma Fernández Pérez and Mary B. Rose (2003), ‘National Determinants of Family Firm Development? Family Firms in Britain, Spain, and Italy in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries’
13. David J. Jeremy (1984), ‘Anatomy of the British Business Elite, 1860–1980’
14. Franco Amatori (2011), ‘Entrepreneurial Typologies in the History of Industrial Italy: Reconsiderations’

B. Technology and Innovation
15. Jonathan Hughes (1973), ‘Eli Whitney and American Technology’
16. Christine MacLeod (1999), ‘Negotiating the Rewards of Invention: The Shop-Floor Inventor in Victorian Britain’
17. Andre Millard (1990), ‘The Business of Innovation’

C. Marketing
18. Jennifer Tann (1978), ‘Marketing Methods in the International Steam Engine Market: The Case of Boulton and Watt’
19. Andrew Popp (2007), ‘Building the Market: John Shaw of Wolverhampton and Commercial Travelling in Early Nineteenth-Century England’
20. Charles Harvey and Jon Press (1986), ‘William Morris and the Marketing of Art’

PART III THE SOCIAL AND INSTITUTIONAL CONTEXT OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP
A. Local Business Networks
21. Jon Stobart (2004), ‘Personal and Commercial Networks in an English Port: Chester in the Early Eighteenth Century’
22. Philip Scranton (1993), ‘Build a Firm, Start Another: The Bromleys and Family Firm Entrepreneurship in the Philadelphia Region’
23. Jacob M. Price (1967), ‘The Rise of Glasgow in the Chesapeake Tobacco Trade, 1707–1775’

B. Access to Finance
24. Simon Ville (1996), ‘Networks and Venture Capital in the Australasian Pastoral Sector before World War Two’
25. Andrew Godley (1996), ‘Jewish Soft Loan Societies in New York and London and Immigrant Entrepreneurship, 1880–1914’

C. Religion and Ethnicity
26. Jacob M. Price (1986), ‘The Great Quaker Business Families of Eighteenth-Century London: The Rise and Fall of a Sectarian Patriciate’
27. David J. Jeremy (1991), ‘The Enlightened Paternalist in Action: William Hesketh Lever at Port Sunlight Before 1914’
28. Hazel Petrie (2006), ‘Maori Enterprise: Ships and Flour Mills’

D. Female Entrepreneurs
29. Hannah Barker (2006), ‘The “Public” Face of Female Enterprise’
30. Alison C. Kay (2009), ‘Retailing Respectibility’


Volume II: Industry Case Studies

Acknowledgements

Introduction An Introduction by the editors to both volumes appears in Volume I

PART IV INTER-INDUSTRY COMPARISONS
A. Textiles and Clothing
1. Christine Jackson (2008), ‘Boom-Time Freaks or Heroic Industrial Pioneers? Clothing Entrepreneurs in Sixteenth- and Early Seventeenth-Century Berkshire’
2. Philip Ollerenshaw (2006), ‘Innovation and Corporate Failure: Cyril Lord in UK Textiles, 1945–1968’

B. Metals and Manufacturing
3. M.W. Flinn (1959), ‘The Lloyds in the Early English Iron Industry’
4. W.H.B. Court (1938), ‘Huguenot Capital in the Black Country Glass Trade’
5. A.E. Musson (1975), ‘Joseph Whitworth and the Growth of Mass-Production Engineering’
6. Per Boje (1993), ‘A Career Approach to Entrepreneurship: The Case of Thomas B. Thrige’
7. David Nasaw (2006), ‘War and Riches, 1860–1865’
8. John N. Ingham (1978), ‘Social Analysis of Iron and Steel Entrepreneurs: General Characteristics and a Pittsburgh Model’
9. Mark Casson and Andrew Godley (2007), ‘Revisiting the Emergence of the Modern Business Enterprise: Entrepreneurship and the Singer Global Distribution System’

C. Food, Drink, Retailing and Household Goods
10. Hoh-Cheung and Lorna H. Mui (1967), ‘Andrew Melrose: Tea Dealer and Grocer of Edinburgh 1812–1833’
11. Simon Phillips and Andrew Alexander (2005), ‘An Efficient Pursuit? Independent Shopkeeping in 1930s Britain’

D. Transport and Communications
12. Sheila Marriner and Francis E. Hyde (1967), ‘John Samuel Swire: the Man and the Family Business’
13. Maurice W. Kirby (1993), ‘The Foundation of the Stockton and Darlington Railway Company, 1818–1825’
14. Mark Casson (2009), ‘Business Strategies and their Effects’
15. Maury Klein (1986), ‘Chess Player’

E. Computing and Information Technology
16. Leslie Berlin (2005), ‘Takeoff’
17. David M. Hart (2005), ‘From “Ward of State” to “Revolutionary Without a Movement”: The Political Development of William C. Norris and Control Data Corporation, 1957–1986’
18. Michael A. Cusumano (2002), ‘The Software Business: Lessons from Bill Gates and Microsoft’

F. Speculative Development: Agriculture, Land, Resources
19. R.H. Tawney (1958), ‘Cranfield in the City’
20. Koji Yamamoto (2011), ‘Piety, Profit and Public Service in the Financial Revolution’
21. William B. Fredericks (1989), ‘A Metropolitan Entrepreneur Par Excellence: Henry E. Huntingdon and the Growth of Southern California, 1898–1927’

G. Agriculture and Resources
22. Richard Blundel and Angela Tregear (2006), ‘From Artisans to “Factories”: The Interpenetration of Craft and Industry in English Cheese-Making, 1650–1950’
23. Katrina Honeyman (1982), ‘The Sough Masters’
24. W. Turrentine Jackson (1968), ‘The Scot Discovers the American West as a Field for Investment’
25. Lisa Bud-Frierman, Andrew Godley and Judith Wale (2010), ‘Weetman Pearson in Mexico and the Emergence of a British Oil Major, 1901–1919’
26. Carl E. Solberg (1982), ‘Entrepreneurship in Public Enterprise: General Enrique Mosconi and the Argentine Petroleum Industry’