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Human Values and Biodiversity Conservation

The Survival of Wild Species Clement A. Tisdell, Professor Emeritus, School of Economics, The University of Queensland, Australia
This pioneering book explores the influence of human values on the willingness of individuals to pay for the conservation of individual wildlife species (and classes of these), to be for or against their survival, and to favour or oppose their harvesting.
Extent: 400 pp
Hardback Price: £95.00 Web: £85.50
Publication Date: 2014
ISBN: 978 1 78254 438 8
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  • Economics and Finance
  • Environmental Economics
  • Environment
  • Ecological Economics
  • Environmental Economics
This pioneering book explores the influence of human values on the willingness of individuals to pay for the conservation of individual wildlife species (and classes of these), to be for or against their survival, and to favour or oppose their harvesting.

Clement Tisdell combines original theories, survey results and experimental findings to assess the economic benefit of conserving particular wild species and to suggest strategies for a sustainable future. With a detailed analysis of 25 species, covering the three classes (mammals, birds and reptiles), this book examines how variations in knowledge and social factors can influence individuals’ evaluation of species. Moreover, economics and ecology are combined to propose sound policies for wildlife management and to provide estimates of the net economic benefit of conserving particular species.

The first work to provide such extensive analysis of human values and conservation, this book is an essential resource for economists, ecologists and all those interested in wildlife management, environment and nature conservation.
‘The books clear strengths are the number of different conservation cases considered, combined with the thoughtful presentation of current conservation policy agendas and environmental economic issues. The natural science references, the conservation policy, practice, and sustainable use information are up-to-date in the different cases discussed. Clearly, Tisdell has taken care to talk with people involved in these actions and to ensure that current policies are reflected upon, given the scientific results he presents. As such, the book is well suited for having a policy impact.’
– Jellesmark Thorsen, Ecology

‘This book provides important insights into wildlife conservation issues in Australia, and the extent to which the public is willing to pay for species conservation. In doing so, the book goes beyond the boundaries of the economics discipline, by adopting an interdisciplinary approach to biodiversity conservation that integrates ecological and sociological factors. This book makes an important contribution to advancing knowledge about the influence of social, economic and psychological factors on the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity in Australia.’
– Australian Journal of Agricultural & Resource Economics
Contents: PART I: BACKGROUND 1. Human values and the conservation of wild species: an overview 2. Basic theory: the economic value of wild species, their conservation and use PART II: VALUES AND SUPPORT FOR THE CONSERVATION OF INDIVIDUAL SPECIES AS WELL AS SUSTAINABLE USE STRATEGIES 3. Changed values and increased support for wildlife conservation as a result of ecotourism: a sea turtle study 4. The economic worth of conserving the Asian elephant 5. Australia’s curious tree-kangaroos: important influences (particularly knowledge) on support for their conservation 6. The social net economic benefit of conserving an endangered marsupial glider: economic and ecological considerations 7. Support for conserving the likeable koala versus that for a critically endangered species of wombat 8. The hawksbill turtle – its conservation and use: public values, attitudes and policies 9. Saltwater crocodiles: human values, conservation and sustainable use PART III: VALUES AND SUPPORT FOR THE CONSERVATION OF MULTIPLE SPECIES AS WELL AS SUSTAINABLE USE STRATEGIES 10. Public support for conserving reptile species: stated values for different species and comparative support for their conservation 11. Influences of knowledge on wildlife valuation and support for conserving species 12. The relative importance of likeability and endangerment for payments to conserve species 13. The similarity principle and public support for the survival of wildlife species 14. The comparative probability of species of mammals, birds and reptiles being selected for survival when only a limited number of species can be chosen 15. Public support for sustainable wildlife harvesting and biodiversity conservation: a case study 16. Public attitudes to wildlife use by Indigenous Australians: conservation issues, marketing and the economic viability of aboriginal wildlife enterprises Index