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Immigration, Internal Migration, and Local Mobility in the U.S.

The late Donald J. Bogue, formerly Professor of Sociology and Research Associate, Population Research Center, University of Chicago and Past President, Population Association of America, US, Gregory Liegel, Co-Founder, ChoreHat and Michael Kozloski, University of Chicago, US
This book provides an important assembly of research findings for all who are interested either in changing or reinforcing present immigration policy. Both comprehensive and up-to-date, the study of the demographic, economic, and social interaction between immigration and internal mobility in the U.S. is based on a fresh analysis of the most recent data from all major available sources.
Extent: 296 pp
Hardback Price: $156.00 Web: $140.40
Publication Date: 2009
ISBN: 978 1 84844 408 9
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This volume provides an important assembly of research findings for all who are interested either in changing or reinforcing present immigration policy. Both comprehensive and up-to-date, the study of the demographic, economic, and social interaction between immigration and internal mobility in the U.S. is based on a fresh analysis of the most recent data from all major available sources.

Covering the past century through the present, the research reflects the concerns and problems of communities that receive migrants, as well as those of the migrants themselves. It provides a factual basis for negotiation between the strong demands for liberalized immigration laws and the equally strong public reaction toward unauthorized immigration. Emphasis is placed upon metropolitan areas, and their central cities and suburban communities. The authors study the role of mobility in neighborhood ‘turnover’ from one ethnic group to another, and how mobility both sustains and weakens clustering by income class, and individual motives for mobility. They find that the hypothesis of the ‘healthy immigrant’ does not extend into, but is in fact reversed, in old age. The book documents how the long-term economic and social adjustment of immigrants is highly dependent upon their skill level and education at time of entry, and discusses the implications of unauthorized immigration.

This multidisciplinary and highly readable volume will appeal to demographers, economists and public policy specialists, as well as academics in labor and industrial economics, sociology, and geography.
‘It is a lucid account, replete with detail, supported by extensive tables, and written in a form that will be readily accessible to a wide readership.’
– Martin Bell, Journal of Population Research
Contents: Preface 1. Basics of Contemporary U.S. Internal Mobility and Immigration 2. Why Americans Move 3. Differential Composition of Metro and Nonmetro Migration Streams 4. Internal Migration and Immigration for Individual U.S. Metropolitan Areas, 1995–2000, in Ecological and Race-Ethnic Perspective 5. Mobility Dynamic of Metro Areas with Large Net Internal Migration Losses and Gains 6. Neighborhood Mobility in Central Cities, Suburbs, and Nonmetro Areas in Race-Ethnic Perspective 7. Income Stratification of U.S. Neighborhoods, 1990–2000: What Roles Does Mobility Currently Play? 8. Immigration and Health in Old Age 9. Comparative Adjustment of Immigrants Index