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Infocrime

Protecting Information Through Criminal Law Eli Lederman, Professor, Tel-Aviv University, The Buchmann Faculty of Law, Israel
It has often been said that information is power. This is more true in the information age than ever. The book profiles the tools used by criminal law to protect confidential information. It deals with the essence of information, the varieties of confidential information, and the basic models for its protection within the context of the Internet and social networks.
Extent: 480 pp
Hardback Price: $175.00 Web: $157.50
Publication Date: 2016
ISBN: 978 1 78536 125 8
Availability: In Stock
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  • Law - Academic
  • Criminal Law and Justice
  • Information and Media Law
It has often been said that information is power. This is more true in the information age than ever. The book profiles the tools used by criminal law to protect confidential information. It deals with the essence of information, the varieties of confidential information, and the basic models for its protection within the context of the Internet and social networks.

Eli Lederman examines the key prohibitions against collecting protected information, and against using, disclosing, and disseminating it without authorization. The investigation cuts across a broad subject matter to discuss and analyze key topics such as trespassing and peeping, the human body as a source of information, computer trespassing, tracking and collecting personal information in the public space, surveillance, privileged communications, espionage and state secrets, trade secrets, personal information held by others, and profiling and sexting.

Infocrime will appeal to graduate and undergraduate scholars and academics in the legal arena, in law schools and schools of communication, and to practicing lawyers with an interest in legal theory and a concern for the protection of the personal realm in a world of increasingly invasive technologies.
‘This substantial contribution is a valuable resource for scholars and decision makers who consider the role of criminal law in controlling unauthorized use of information.'
– Geraldine Szott Moohr, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice

‘A comprehensive study of criminal law on the prominent forms of protection provided for confidential information, this monograph is a valuable contribution for its tripartite modeling of criminal provisions aimed at protecting confidential information against unauthorized use or disclosure. Since the notion of “protection of information” may extend to several branches of criminal law safeguarding diverse values and interests – e.g. peeping, interception of communication, eavesdropping, commercial espionage, etc. – the well-designed empirical research on criminal provisions based on a distinction as to the source, medium of transfer or the content of the confidential information makes the book a useful tool both for scholars and practitioners.’
– Paul De Hert, University of Brussels/Tilburg, Belgium

‘Infocrime: Protecting Information Through Criminal Law is a timely, rigorous and insightful contribution to the law of information. Professor Lederman has developed comprehensive models for the protection of information that enable the reader to understand the nature and evolution of information crimes. The patchwork quilt that is American information law has challenged broad theoretical attempts to elucidate the law before, so it is encouraging to see the success of Lederman's novel perspective and, very importantly, to discern how criminal law will respond to pressing contemporary issues such as privacy and cyber-bullying. On these Lederman offers sober, thoughtful suggestions for the appropriate application of criminal law that act as a measured counterpoint against the inevitable rush of technological development.’
– Avner Levin, Ryerson University, Canada

Contents: 1. Concepts, Terms, Structure 2. The Spatial Model 3. The Communication Model 4a. The Content Model: NATIONAL SECURITY AND TRADE SECRETS 4b. The Content Model: INFORMATION PRIVACY 5. Epilogue Index