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Innovation and Employment

Process versus Product Innovation Charles Edquist, Professor, CIRCLE, Lund University, Sweden, the late Leif Hommen, formerly in CIRCLE, Lund University, Lund, Sweden and Maureen McKelvey, Professor of Industrial Management, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
Which kinds of growth lead to increased employment and which do not? This is one of the questions that this important volume attempts to answer. The book explores the complex relationships between innovation, growth and employment that are vital for both research into, and policy for, the creation of jobs.
Extent: 224 pp
Hardback Price: $127.00 Web: $114.30
Publication Date: 2001
ISBN: 978 1 84064 414 2
Availability: In Stock
Paperback Price: $57.00 Web: $45.60
Publication Date: 2001
ISBN: 978 1 84064 427 2
Availability: In Stock
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  • Economics and Finance
  • Economics of Innovation
  • Industrial Economics
  • Innovation and Technology
  • Economics of Innovation
Which kinds of growth lead to increased employment and which do not? This is one of the questions that this important volume attempts to answer. The book explores the complex relationships between innovation, growth and employment that are vital for both research into, and policy for, the creation of jobs.

Politicians claiming that more rapid growth would remedy unemployment do not usually specify what kind of growth is meant. Is it, for example, economic (GDP) or productivity growth? Growing concern over ‘jobless growth’ requires both policymakers and researchers to make such distinctions, and to clarify their employment implications.

The authors initially address their theoretical approach to, and conceptualization of, innovation and employment, where the distinction between process and product innovations and between high-tech and low-tech goods and services are central. They go on to address the relationship between innovation and employment, using empirical material to analyse the effects that different kinds of innovations have upon job creation and destruction. Finally, the volume summarizes the findings and addresses conclusions as well as policy implications.

This book will be of great interest to those involved in research and policy in the fields of macroeconomics (economic growth and employment), industrial economics and innovation.
‘This book is an important addition to what can be broadly referred to as the national systems of innovation (NSI) approach. The particular contribution of the book is in the examination of the employment effects of innovation, something only indirectly considered hitherto. . . It is a thorough integration of existing knowledge on the key employment implications of innovation. . .’
– Rachel Parker, Labour and Industry

‘This is a highly readable, non-technical book . . . a highly clear and well-argued book that should be useful for policymakers and higher education alike. It brings together much of the most recent and useful literature in the area of innovation, employment and related public policy. It is an opportune addition to the existing documentation on the subject.’
– Journal of Economics / Zeitschrift für Nationalökonomie
Contents: Preface Part I: Theoretical Approach and Conceptual Framework 1. A Systems of Innovation Perspective on Employment 2. Specification of Basic Concepts Part II: Innovations and Employment 3. Process Innovations and Employment 4. Product Innovations and Employment 5. Dynamic and Secondary Effects of Systemic Interaction Part III: Summary, Conclusions and Policy Implications 6. Summary and Conclusions 7. Implications for Public Policy and Firm Strategy Part IV: Appendices Appendix A: Defining and Measuring Product and Process Innovations Appendix B: Organizational Innovations Appendix C: Taxonomies of Innovation References Index