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Innovation, Technology and Economic Change

Edited by Jan Fagerberg, Professor, Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture (TIK), University of Oslo, Norway and David C. Mowery, William A. and Betty H. Hasler Chair in New Enterprise Development, Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley, US
Several attempts have been made since the 1970s to collect key scholarly papers and document the progress of the field of innovation studies. The collection of papers included in this new title, most of which were published after the turn of the millennium, stands on the shoulders of these earlier volumes and seeks to provide a broad overview of recent progress in research on innovation and economic change. In their choice of papers, the editors address the characteristics of the field of innovation studies and its relationship to other areas of (social) science: innovation in firms; factors influencing firms’ innovation performance; innovation systems; innovation and economic “catch-up” and, finally, policy issues for innovation.
Extent: 944 pp
Hardback Price: $510.00 Web: $459.00
Publication Date: 2015
ISBN: 978 1 78347 499 8
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  • Economics and Finance
  • Economics of Innovation
  • Innovation and Technology
  • Economics of Innovation
  • Technology and ICT
Several attempts have been made since the 1970s to collect key scholarly papers and document the progress of the field of innovation studies. The collection of papers included in this new title, most of which were published after the turn of the millennium, stands on the shoulders of these earlier volumes and seeks to provide a broad overview of recent progress in research on innovation and economic change. In their choice of papers, the editors address the characteristics of the field of innovation studies and its relationship to other areas of (social) science: innovation in firms; factors influencing firms’ innovation performance; innovation systems; innovation and economic “catch-up” and, finally, policy issues for innovation.

Including an original introduction by the editors, Innovation, Technology and Economic Change brings together the most important recent papers in the area together in a comprehensive collection to provide an invaluable resource for academics and students alike.
36 articles, dating from 1996 to 2013
Contributors include: M. Abramovitz, W. Cohen, P.A. David, C. Edquist, B. Hall, S. Klepper, B.R. Martin, S. Stern, D. Teece
Contents:

Introduction Jan Fagerberg and David C. Mowery

PART I INNOVATION STUDIES: EVOLUTION AND CHALLENGES
1. Jan Fagerberg, Morten Fosaas and Koson Sapprasert (2012), ‘Innovation: Exploring the Knowledge Base’, Research Policy, 41 (7), September, 1132–53

2. Ben R. Martin (2013), ‘Innovation Studies: An Emerging Agenda’, in Jan Fagerberg, Ben R. Martin and Esben Sloth Andersen (eds), Innovation Studies: Evolution and Future Challenges, Chapter 8, Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 168–86

PART II INNOVATION IN FIRMS
3. Eric von Hippel (2005), ‘Democratizing Innovation: The Evolving Phenomenon of User Innovation’, Journal für Betriebswirtschaft, 55 (1), March, 63–78

4. Keld Laursen and Ammon Salter (2006), ‘Open for Innovation: The Role of Openness in Explaining Innovation Performance Among U.K. Manufacturing Firms’, Strategic Management Journal, 27 (2), February, 131–50

5. David J. Teece (2007), ‘Explicating Dynamic Capabilities: The Nature and Microfoundations of (Sustainable) Enterprise Performance’, Strategic Management Journal, 28 (13), December, 1319–50

6. Bruno Cassiman and Reinhilde Veugelers (2006), ‘In Search of Complementarity in Innovation Strategy: Internal R&D and External Knowledge Acquisition’, Management Science, 52 (1), January, 68–82

7. Morten Berg Jensen, Björn Johnson, Edward Lorenz and Bengt Åke Lundvall (2007), ‘Forms of Knowledge and Modes of Innovation’, Research Policy, 36 (5), June, 680–93

8. Bruno Crépon, Emmanuel Duguet and Jacques Mairesse (1998), ‘Research, Innovation and Productivity: An Econometric Analysis at the Firm Level’, Economics of Innovation and New Technology, 7 (2), 115–58

9. Wesley M. Cohen and Steven Klepper (1996), ‘A Reprise of Size and R&D’, Economic Journal, 106 (437), July, 925¬–51

PART III INNOVATION: FACTORS, APPROPRIATION AND MARKETS
10. Ron A. Boschma (2005), ‘Proximity and Innovation: A Critical Assessment’, Regional Studies, 39 (1), February, 61–74

11. Steven Klepper (2010), ‘The Origin and Growth of Industry Clusters: The Making of Silicon Valley and Detroit’, Journal of Urban Economics, 67 (1), January, 15–32

12. Bronwyn H. Hall (2002), ‘The Financing of Research and Development’, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 18 (1), Spring, 35–51

13. Wesley M. Cohen, Richard R. Nelson and John P. Walsh (2000), ‘Protecting Their Intellectual Assets: Appropriability Conditions and Why U.S. Manufacturing Firms Patent (Or Not)’, NBER Working Paper No. 7552, i, 1–31, notes

14. Ashish Arora and Alfonso Gambardella (2010), ‘Ideas for Rent: An Overview of Markets for Technology’, Industrial and Corporate Change, 19 (3), June, 775–803

15. David C. Mowery and Arvids A. Ziedonis (2002), ‘Academic Patent Quality Before and After the Bayh-Dole Act in the United States’, Research Policy, 31 (3), March, 399–418

16. Petra Moser (2005), ‘How Do Patent Laws Influence Innovation? Evidence From Nineteenth-Century World’s Fairs’, American Economic Review, 95 (4), September, 1214–36

17. Ian Miles (2004), ‘Innovation in Services’, in Jan Fagerberg, David C. Mowery and Richard R. Nelson (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Innovation, Chapter 16, Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 433–58

PART IV INNOVATION SYSTEMS
18. Chris Freeman (2002), ‘Continental, National and Sub-National Innovation Systems — Complementarity and Economic Growth’, Research Policy, 31 (2), February, 191–211

19. Xielin Liu and Steven White (2001), ‘Comparing Innovation Systems: A Framework and Application to China’s Transitional Context’, Research Policy, 30 (7), August, 1091–114

20. Henry Etzkowitz and Loet Leydesdorff (2000), ‘The Dynamics of Innovation: From National Systems and “Mode 2” to a Triple Helix of University-Industry-Government Relations’, Research Policy, 29 (2), February, 109–23

21. Bjørn T. Asheim and Lars Coenen (2005), ‘Knowledge Bases and Regional Innovation Systems: Comparing Nordic Clusters’, Research Policy, 34 (8), October, 1173–90

22. Franco Malerba (2002), ‘Sectoral Systems of Innovation and Production’, Research Policy, 31 (2), February, 247–64

23. Anna Bergek, Staffan Jacobsson, Bo Carlsson, Sven Lindmark and Annika Rickne (2008), ‘Analyzing the Functional Dynamics of Technological Innovation Systems: A Scheme of Analysis’, Research Policy, 37 (3), April, 407–29

PART V INNOVATION, GROWTH AND CATCHING-UP
24. Moses Abramovitz and Paul A. David (1996), ‘Convergence and Deferred Catch-Up: Productivity Leadership and the Waning of American Exceptionalism’, in Ralph Landau, Timothy Taylor and Gavin Wright (eds), The Mosaic of Economic Growth, Redwood City, CA: Stanford University Press, 21–62

25. Linsu Kim (1999), ‘Building Technological Capability for Industrialization: Analytical Frameworks and Korea’s Experience’, Industrial and Corporate Change, 8 (1), March, 111–36

26. Jeffrey L. Furman, Michael E. Porter and Scott Stern (2002), ‘The Determinants of National Innovative Capacity’, Research Policy, 31 (6), August, 899–933

27. Daniele Archibugi and Alberto Coco (2005), ‘Measuring Technological Capabilities at the Country Level: A Survey and a Menu for Choice’, Research Policy, 34 (2), March, 175–94

28. Kyoo-Ho Park and Keun Lee (2006), ‘Linking the Technological Regime to the Technological Catch-Up: Analyzing Korea and Taiwan Using the US Patent Data’, Industrial and Corporate Change, 15 (4), August, 715–53

29. Daron Acemoglu, Philippe Aghion and Fabrizio Zilibotti (2006), ‘Distance to Frontier, Selection, and Economic Growth’, Journal of the European Economic Association, 4 (1), March, 37–74

30. Jan Fagerberg and Martin Srholec (2008), ‘National Innovation Systems, Capabilities and Economic Development’, Research Policy, 37 (9), October, 1417–35

PART VI INNOVATION AND POLICY
31. Patries Boekholt (2010), ‘The Evolution of Innovation Paradigms and their Influence on Research, Technological Development and Innovation Policy Instruments’, in Ruud E. Smits, Stefan Kuhlmann and Philip Shapira (eds), The Theory and Practice of Innovation Policy, Chapter 14, Cheltenham, UK and Northampton, MA, USA: Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd, 333–59

32. René Kemp, Johan Schot and Remco Hoogma (1998), ‘Regime Shifts to Sustainability Through Processes of Niche Information: The Approach of Strategic Niche Management’, Technology Analysis and Strategic Management, 10 (2), 175–98

33. Ruud Smits and Stefan Kuhlmann (2004), ‘The Rise of Systemic Instruments in Innovation Policy’, International Journal of Foresight and Innovation Policy, 1 (1/2), 4–32

34. Jakob Edler and Luke Georghiou (2007), ‘Public Procurement and Innovation—Resurrecting the Demand Side’, Research Policy, 36 (7), September, 949–63

35. Charles Edquist (2011), ‘Design of Innovation Policy through Diagnostic Analysis: Identification of Systemic Problems (or Failures)’, Industrial and Corporate Change, 20 (6), December, 1725–53

36. David C. Mowery (2011), ‘Federal Policy and the Development of Semiconductors, Computer Hardware and Computer Software: A Policy Model for Climate Change R&D?’, in Rebecca M. Henderson and Richard G. Newell (eds), Accelerating Energy Innovation: Insights from Multiple Sectors, Chapter 5, Chicago, IL, USA: University of Chicago Press, 159–88

Index