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Innovation, Technology Policy and Regional Development

Evidence from China and Australia Edited by Tim Turpin, Professorial Fellow, Centre for Industry and Innovation Studies, University of Western Sydney, Australia, Liu Xielin, Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, PRC, Sam Garrett-Jones, Associate Professor, Department of Management and the Centre for Research Policy and Innovation Studies, Faculty of Commerce, University of Wollongong, Australia and Peter Burns, Associate Director, Centre for Telecommunications Information Networking and Visiting Fellow, Department of History, Adelaide University, Australia
This book is the result of a comparative investigation that contrasts micro-systems of innovation in several regions of China and Australia – two vastly different countries in terms of traditions, industry structures, political systems and economic organisation. Six regional studies comprehensively document the experiences of firms engaged in product or process innovation. The book also examines the institutions that support research and development and the impact of government policies on innovation in each of the regions studied.
Extent: 256 pp
Hardback Price: $128.00 Web: $115.20
Publication Date: 2003
ISBN: 978 1 84064 508 8
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  • Economics and Finance
  • Regional Economics
  • Innovation and Technology
  • Innovation Policy
This book is the result of a comparative investigation that contrasts micro-systems of innovation in several regions of China and Australia – two vastly different countries in terms of traditions, industry structures, political systems and economic organisation. Six regional studies comprehensively document the experiences of firms engaged in product or process innovation. The book also examines the institutions that support research and development and the impact of government policies on innovation in each of the regions studied.

The case-studies present original and informative insights into the different ways in which local, national and transnational interests interact and influence regional development. These findings support the view that local innovation systems are emerging with quite different structural characteristics. The authors conclude that local, national and transnational dimensions are continually redefining and aligning themselves in novel and interesting ways. They highlight the importance of identifying these structural relationships in order to encourage dynamic innovation to occur. This, they argue, has important implications for policymakers concerned with the promotion of innovation in regional areas.

Innovation, Technology Policy and Regional Development will be of great interest to those involved in research and policy in the fields of economic growth and employment, industrial economics and innovation.
Contributors: D. Aylward, P. Burns, S. Garrett-Jones, Z. Guo, X. Liu, K. Mohannak, T. Turpin, H. Zhang
Contents: Part I: Innovation Knowledge Systems and Regional Development 1. Introduction 2. Contemporary Perspectives and Debates 3. Contrasting Policies for Regional and National Innovation Systems in China and Australia Part II: Evidence from China 4. Innovation in Liuzhou: A Case of State-Led Innovation by State-Owned Enterprises 5. Quanzhou: Innovating Through Non-State-Owned Enterprises 6. Integrated Innovation in Ningxia: Natural Resources and New Knowledge Part III: Evidence from Australia 7. Regional Innovation: Experiences of Small Firms in Non-Metropolitan Australia 8. Innovation Linkages and Clustering Among Information Technology and Telecommunications Firms in Metropolitan Melbourne 9. Citadels and Clusters: Towards a Regional Innovation System in Adelaide 10. Conclusion: Intersecting Systems of Innovation References Index