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International Humanitarian Law

Edited by John Cerone, Paul Martin Senior Professorship in International Affairs and Law, University of Windsor, Faculty of Law, Canada and Visiting Professor of International Law, The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, US
This volume brings together traditional and contemporary articles by leading scholars in international humanitarian law. It incorporates key papers published between 1625 and 2012 that investigate the major themes of the field including the development of international humanitarian law, human rights law, international criminal law, gender-related violence in armed conflict, the changing nature of occupation and cyber war.

With an original introduction by the editor this insightful collection will prove an essential reference point for students, researchers and policymakers.
Extent: 904 pp
Hardback Price: $445.00 Web: $400.50
Publication Date: 2017
ISBN: 978 1 78100 352 7
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  • Law - Academic
  • Human Rights
  • Public International Law
  • Humanitarian Law
  • Politics and Public Policy
  • Human Rights
This volume brings together traditional and contemporary articles by leading scholars in international humanitarian law. It incorporates key papers published between 1625 and 2012 that investigate the major themes of the field including the development of international humanitarian law, human rights law, international criminal law, gender-related violence in armed conflict, the changing nature of occupation and cyber war.

With an original introduction by the editor this insightful collection will prove an essential reference point for students, researchers and policymakers.

24 articles, dating from 1625 to 2012
Contributors include: K. Dörmann, C.H.B. Garraway, H. Grotius, F. Hampson, G. Nolte, S. Ratner, M.N. Schmitt
Contents:

Introduction John Cerone

PART I Introductory materials
A. The Classical Period
1. Hugo Grotius ([1625] 1901), ‘What is Lawful in War’, ‘On the Right of Killing an Enemy in Lawful War, and Committing Other Acts of Hostility’, ‘On the Right to Lay Waste an Enemy’s Country, and Carry off his Effects’, ‘On the Right Over Prisoners of War’, ‘The Right of Killing Enemies, In Just War, To Be Tempered with Moderation and Humanity’, ‘On Moderation in Despoiling an Enemy’s Country’, ‘On Moderation in Making Captures in War’, in The Rights of War and Peace, Including the Law of Nature and of Nations’, Book III, Chapter I, Chapter IV, Chapter V, Chapter VII, Chapter XI, Chapter XII and Chapter XIII [Translated by Archibald Colin Campbell], Washington, DC: M. Walter Dunne, 290–306, 323–331, 332–333, 345–347, 359–364, 365–368, 369–371

B. The Development of International Humanitarian law
2. Frits Kalshoven (1987), ‘The Main Currents: Geneva, The Hague, New York’, in Constraints on the Waging of War, 1st Edition, Chapter 2, Geneva, Switzerland: International Committee of the Red Cross, 7–23

C. The Role of the International Committee of the Red Cross
3. Steven R. Ratner (2011), ‘Law Promotion Beyond Law Talk: The Red Cross, Persuasion, and the Laws of War’, European Journal of International Law, 22 (2), 459–506

PART II Basic Principles
A. Scope of Application
4. G. Abi-Saab (1979), ‘The Legal Status of Wars of National Liberation,’ in Wars of National Liberation in the Geneva Conventions and Protocols: Collected Courses of the Hague Academy of International Law 165, Chapter 1, Leiden, the Netherlands: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 366–92

5. Theodor Meron (2000), ‘The Humanization of Humanitarian Law’, American Journal of International Law, 94 (2), April, 239–78

6. Hans-Peter Gasser (2002), ‘Acts of Terror, ‘’Terrorism’’ and International Humanitarian Law’, International Review of the Red Cross, 84 (847), September, 547–70

7. Tristan Ferraro (2012), ‘Determining the Beginning and End of an Occupation under Humanitarian Law’, International Review of the Red Cross, 94 (885), Spring, 133–63

B. Distinction and Proportionality
8. Frits Kalshoven (1977), ‘Reaffirmation and Development of International Humanitarian Law Applicable in Armed Conflicts: The Diplomatic Conference, Geneva, 1974–1977’, Netherlands Yearbook of International Law, VIII, 107–35

9. Georg Nolte (2010), ‘Thin or Thick? The Principle of Proportionality and International Humanitarian Law’, Law and Ethics of Human Rights, 4 (2), September, 245–55

10. Michael N. Schmitt (2010), ’The Interpretive Guidance on the Notion of Direct Participation in Hostilities, A Critical Analysis’, Harvard National Security Journal, 1, May, 5–44

11. Nils Melzer (2010), ‘Keeping the Balance between Military Necessity and Humanity: A Response to Four Critiques of the ICRC’s Interpretive Guidance on the Notion of Direct Participation in the Hostilities’, New York University Journal of International Law and Politics 42 (3), Spring, 831–916

C. Combatant Status
12. Major Richard R. Baxter (1951), ‘So-Called “Unprivileged Belligerency": Spies, Guerrillas, and Saboteurs’, British Year Book of International Law, 28, 323-45

13. Charles H.B. Garraway (2007), ‘”Combatants” - Substance or Semantics?’ in M.N Schmitt and J. Pejic (eds), International Law and Armed Conflict: Exploring the Faultlines, Essays in Honour of Yoram Dinstein, Leiden, the Netherlands: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 317–34

14. Robert K. Goldman and Brian D. Tittemore (2002), ‘Unprivileged Combatants and the Hostilities in Afghanistan: Their Status and Rights Under International Humanitarian and Human Rights Law’, American Society of International Law Task Force on Terrorism, December, 1–57

PART III Relationships with other bodies of international law
A. International Humanitarian Law and International Human Rights Law
15. Françoise J. Hampson (2008), ‘The Relationship between International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights Law from the Perspective of a Human Rights Treaty Body’, International Review of the Red Cross, 90 (871), September, 549-–72

16. John Cerone (2007), ‘Jurisdiction and Power: The Intersection of Human Rights Law and the Law of Non-International Armed Conflict in an Extraterritorial Context’, Israel Law Review, 40 (2), 396–452

B. International Humanitarian Law, International Criminal Law, and Non-State Actors
17. John Cerone (2009), ‘Much Ado about Non-State Actors: The Vanishing Relevance of State Affiliation in International Criminal Law’, San Diego International Law Journal, 10, May, 335–56

PART IV Contemporary Developments and Controversies
A. Gender-Related Violence in Armed Conflict
18. Kelly D. Askin (2003), ‘Prosecuting Wartime Rape and Other Gender- Related Crimes under International Law: Extraordinary Advances, Enduring Obstacles’, Berkeley Journal of International Law, 21 (2), 288–349

B. The Changing Nature of Occupation
19. Marco Sassòli (2005), ‘Legislation and Maintenance of Public Order and Civil Life by Occupying Powers’, European Journal of International Law, 16 (4), September, 661–94

20. Carsten Stahn (2007), ‘“Jus ad Bellum”, “Jus in Bello”… “Jus post Bellum?”’, Rethinking the Conception of the Law of Armed Force’, European Journal of International Law, 17 (5), 921–43

21. Kenneth Watkin (2012), ‘Use of Force during Occupation: Law Enforcement and Conduct of Hostilities’, International Review of the Red Cross, 94 (885), Spring, 267–315

C. Targeted Killings
22. David Kretzmer (2005), ‘Targeted Killing of Suspected Terrorists: Extra-Judicial Executions or Legitimate Means of Defence?’, European Journal of International Law, 16 (2), April, 171–212

23. Mary Ellen O’Connell (2011), ‘Remarks: The Resort to Drones Under International Law’, Denver Journal of International Law and Policy, 39 (4), Fall, 585–600

D. Cyber War
24. Knut Dörmann (2005), ‘The Applicability of the Additional Protocols to Computer Network Attacks: An ICRC Viewpoint’, in Karin Byström (ed.), International Expert Conference on Computer Network Attacks and the Applicability of International Humanitarian Law, Stockholm, Sweden: Swedish Ministry for Foreign Affairs, 139–53

Index